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Motley crew

Posted by Mikkel , in Gallery, The Bay 12 June 2010 · 4,027 views

gallery siphons stock Bay 6-wheelers 4-wheelers 3232 clerestories

After a tough spell at work it's been great to just run some stock back and forth today - no rules, no schedules, anything goes!

 

Fortunately, GWR trains at the turn of the century lend themselves pretty well to that state of mind. A variety of stock, styles and liveries could be seen mixed together in the same train. Who said Great Western trains were all the same!

 

Here are some examples as seen on Farthing.

 

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Above we see the Westbury stopping train with a motley assembly of stock, as seen on many secondary trains of the period. Four-wheelers, six-wheelers and bogie stock all in the same train.

 

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Three different roof-profiles on view here: Clerestory roof on the non-corridor C10 Third (RTR-bashed Triang), single-arc roof on the six-wheel R2 First (Blacksmith kit) and 3-arc roof on the Siphon (K's kit).

 

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Two siphons of very different height and appearance. On the right is the open-slatted 6-wheeler to Diagram O1. On the left is a 4-wheel Siphon C (Shirescenes kit) with the later more modern look and higher sides.

 

 

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The eaves panels just below the roof also varied in height and added further to the variety of Edwardian GWR trains. The R2 on the right has the early deep panels, while the All Third S9 on the left sports the later more shallow style.

 

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During the 1900s some of the graceful Dean mainline classes began to be allocated to lesser secondary services. Here is 2-4-0 No. 3245 of the 3232 class. This loco (a Finney kit) has recently been brought back to life after a long period of motor failure.

 

 

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The Edwardian period saw a number of livery changes on the GWR within a short span of time. The coach on the left carries my simplified version of the 1880-1908 chocolate and cream livery, while on the right is a six-wheel PBV in the lake livery of 1912. A closer look at the latter coach reveals that this a rather unfinished restoration job! I did say 'anything goes' Posted Image.

 

 

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A last shot of a couple of coaches in the bay. It's a funny old hobby we have: Watching some bits of metal and plastic moving back and forth, and getting a kick out of it! But it sure is relaxing Posted Image.

 

PS:
According to Wikipedia...
"A motley crew is a cliché for a roughly-organized assembly of characters. Motley crews are, by definition, non-uniform and undisciplined as a group. They are characterised by containing characters of conflicting personality [and] varying backgrounds...". Sounds just like my trains. Or is that RMweb I've just described? Posted Image

  • Like x 3





Lovely stuff!

Good to see you posting again Mikkel - always a pleasure to read your threads.

PS. No comment on your PS :lol:
Good to see you back, Mikkel. I know what you mean about work, it can be such an inconvenience at times :rolleyes: As ever, it's the little details like the mail bags and parcels that make all the difference to your excellent photos, not to mention the Captain Birdseye figure :D That certainly is a motley collection of stock, but so very prototypical for the minor lines. It reminds me I have a Siphon C to finish and have been looking for an O1 for ages with no success. Maybe I'll just have to scratch build one.

Nick

ps. I'd not noticed the rather good weathered wood effect on the underside of the canopy before. How did you achieve that?
Ditto what Nick said.I do like siphons myself.I've always fancied doing one of those siphon c's myself.Are they sraightforward ?Even the Dart Castings platform seat looks superb.Top modelling.
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pointstaken
Jun 13 2010 12:30
Ah, but it's the obvious creativity and attention to detail that makes it for you - running the lumps of plastic and metal backwards and forwards is a secondary consideration. Thanks for the photos, they give a lot of us something to aim at.

Dennis
once again absolutely superb.

Rovex
Thanks all, much appreciated :)

Nick, the weathered wood effect is simple dry-bushing, using mainly dark brown with a bit of pale sand thrown in to vary the shade and add depth.

Robin, the Shirescenes Siphon C is relatively straightforward and makes for a satisfactory build, I find. Some shortening of the donor (Ratio) roof and chassis is required. I did a write-up on the build here once: http://www.gwr.org.uk/prosiphon.html

Thanks all, much appreciated :)

Nick, the weathered wood effect is simple dry-bushing, using mainly dark brown with a bit of pale sand thrown in to vary the shade and add depth.

Robin, the Shirescenes Siphon C is relatively straightforward and makes for a satisfactory build, I find. Some shortening of the roof and chassis is required. I did a write-up on the build here once: http://www.gwr.org.uk/prosiphon.html


Cheers Mikkel.That article takes me back to when I first came across your old site.Very nice and do-able.
hello ! nice varied collection of pictures, always enjoy browsing :)
Cheers John. I find that adding a bit of variety to the stock is one way of sustaining operating interest in micro-layouts. But you already know that of course, master of variety as you are!
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Miss Prism
Jun 17 2010 12:12
Always good to see pics of the Bay - excellent stuff as usual.

Can't help thinking though that your white coach rooves are a bit too pristine, Mikkel, even for your era.
I totally agree Miss P. I used to prefer pristine stock, but not any more. The plan is to weather these coaches lightly, including the rooves.

Not sure though whether I should go all the way and paint the rooves all over grey, or just a light weathering.
I must say Mikkel what a lovely train! Odds and sods, just perfect! All you need now is a Steam Railmotor!

Regards,

Nick
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Miss Prism
Jun 22 2010 11:07

Not sure though whether I should go all the way and paint the rooves all over grey, or just a light weathering.

At any one time, there is likely to be a mixture - a few newly-outshopped vehicles with a still-noticeably white roof, but the majority of vehicles in various stages of dark browny-grey. I'm inclined to believe that roof weathering was quite rapid, with perhaps only a few months of use (depending a bit on location etc) before there was a significant layer of darker grime. "Edwardian Enterprise" (WSP) is particularly good I think for a guide, but it's very difficult to assess how often rooves were cleaned before WWI. Having said that, there was an interesting discussion a while back on the gwr-elist concerning wagons, and examination of some aerial shots taken in the 1930s showed a surprisingly higher than expected proportion of wagons that were still light in colour. Whatever the choice of roof 'colour', the coverage tends to be very even - a white roof on which some uneven brown has been streaked looks very unrealistic in my view. In most cases, it's probably not a good idea to have a base white colour at the build stage.
Brinkly: Ah yes, a Steam Railmotor would be rather nice to throw in! Perhaps even pulling a goods van or two - I seem to remember seeing a photo of such a scene, although I'm not sure where.

Miss P: Many thanks for this, I think I will go for an all-over dark grey then, with a couple of newly painted white rooves just to emphasize the motley-ness (not a word, I think!). I agree about avoiding the "streaked" weathered look on white rooves, I experimented on a van once and it looked awful. The discussion on the e-list sounds interesting btw, will have a look.
Absolutely fabulous modelling and great to see something Edwardian too!
Thanks Steve! Edwardian is such a great period to model, I find: Great liveries, elegant designs, varied stock and short(ish) trains. I suppose there's a risk of romanticising it all, but as modellers I think we're allowed to be a bit selective at times...

Welcome to Farthing!

Attached Image: farthing2.jpg

 

This blog chronicles the building of "The Farthing layouts", a series of small OO layouts that portray different sections of a GWR junction station in Edwardian days.

 

Intro and concept
How to eat an elephant
Design principles
State of play

 

Gallery (1900-1904)
Four o'clock blues, ca. 1902
What really happened in the Cuban...
The honourable slipper boy (Part 1)
The honourable slipper boy (Part 2)
The honourable slipper boy (Part 3)

 

Gallery (1904-08)
The trials of Mr Bull
A most implausible arrival
A parcel for Mr Ahern
Blue skies and horse traffic
The Remains of the Day
Motley crew

Edwardian daydreams

 

Gallery (1914)
All in a day's work, Part 1
All in a day's work, Part 2
All in a day's work, Part 3
All in a day's work, Part 4

 

Out of period
Undecided sky (1867)
The sleeping giant (1887)
Bunker first (1927)
Fitted fish and piles (1947)

 

Videos
Once Upon a Time in the West
Summer silliness
The unbearable lightness...
Across the years
The Sidelight Job
Painting coach panels

Traverser testing

 

Coaches
Low-tech pre-grouping stock

Short trains for short layouts
Short trains with a twist
Hand-me-down coaches
Low-tech coach restoration (1)
Low-tech coach restoration (2)
Low-tech coach restoration (3)
Low-tech coach restoration (4)
Low-tech coach restoration (5)

 

Wagons
Sprat & Winkle couplings
3 plank Open in GWR red
Outside Framed 8 Ton Van

In the red: GWR 1900s wagon liveries
In loving memory...
Scratchbuilt one-planker (1)
Scratchbuilt one-planker (2)
MSWJR 3-plank dropside
LSWR 10 ton sliding door van
SDJR Road Van
LSWR stone wagon
Fake news and wagon sheets

 

Locos
GWR 1854 Saddle Tank (1)
GWR 1854 Saddle Tank (2)
Shiny domes and safety valve covers
Backdating the Oxford Dean Goods (1)

 

Track
C+L underlay and Carr's ballast
Experiments with C+L track
Comparing track
Messing about with track panels
Laying track on "The depot"

 

Vehicles
GWR horse-drawn trolley
GWR 5-ton horse-drawn vehicle
Parcels van and coal trolley

 

Goods
Fun with crates
Barrels, baskets, bales
Small crates and tea chests

 

Figures
Andrew Stadden 4mm figures
Backdated Monty's figures
Footplate crew
HO figures for an OO layout
Lesser known whitemetal figures

 

Building "The bay"
First bite: "The bay"
Simple structures for "The bay"
Platform trolleys and barrows
Signs, posters and adverts
Six lessons learnt

 

Building "The depot"
Second bite: "The depot"
Shunting Puzzle
Sketches of The depot
Soft body, hard shell
Kit-bashed roof structure
Dry Run
Dusting off the cobwebs
Playing with mirrors
Mezzanine floor
Progress on "The depot"
4mm slate roofing
The treachery of images

A roof for "The depot"

A tall bird from Paddington
Cranes for the depot
Shoulders of giants
Flight of the bumblebee

 

Building "The sidings"
Third bite: "The sidings"
Wagon propulsion
Progress on "The sidings"
Rising from slumber
The Biscuit Shed
A shed and a lock-up
Agricultural merchant's warehouse
Mr Gorbachev, tear down this wall

 

Building "The stables"
GWR Park Royal stable block
GWR stables - an overview

 

The FSWDC
Railway modelling and Art
Moving Pictures
Season's greetings

 

Layout ideas
A flexible layout
Kicking back in Gloucester

 

Miscellaneous
Pre-grouping livery clippings
Journey to Didcot
Detail hunting at Didcot
Here's looking at you
The mists of time (and all that)
My friend the operating chair
Ready-to-plonk freight
GWR Modelling website

 

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