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The sleeping giant (1887)

Posted by Mikkel , in The Bay, Gallery, Figures 25 March 2011 · 2,146 views

figures stock Bay gallery buffalo
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Farthing, 1887. The Great Western is a sleeping giant. The system is plagued by gauge inconsistencies and circuitous routes, and the Churchward revolution is yet to come. In the bay platform at Farthing, a Buffalo tank sleepily knocks a few wagons about.



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For the past ten years the world has suffered from a global economic depression, but Workman P. Quince has never read a newspaper and is more concerned with the stinging pain when he urinates. Perhaps he should find a better way to spend his meagre wages.


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The Buffalo tank shunts the empty Open and brake van into the storage siding.The locos and rolling stock carry the features of a vanishing age. The livery follows Atkins, Beard and Tourret when they state: Before about 1898, a light red colour had been adopted for the wagon stock with white lettering, but the goods brakes were grey.



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A bird's eye view of the scene. The timber sheds are a bit crude and don't feature in the normal 1907 set-up of the layout, but I thought they suited the slightly Wild West atmosphere of the early days. They were loosely inspired by similar sheds at the old Newbury station.



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As if rebelling against the slumbering nature of his railway, Driver P. Appledore demonstrates his uncanny ability to make even the slowest shunt look like a mainline express. "It's not what we do" he would tell new firemen, "It's how we carry ourselves. Look sharp!".



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The shunt brings the wagons up against the buffers. This is a 3-plank Open of 1881 vintage, and a pre-diagram brake van of 1882. The former was built from the David Geen kit, and the latter was restored from an old van originally scratchbuilt by Chris Edge.


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The brake van is left in the storage siding while the Open is propelled to the loading dock. Certain aspects of the loco are not, I fear, entirely correct for the period. Eg I am unsure whether the curve of the cabside is right for 1887. The otherwise appealing number 1234 is also problematic, as I am not sure that this particular loco had yet been converted to narrow gauge by this time.



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The loco has left and brought the brake van with it. The bay has gone quiet, and Porter C. Walker appears to be lost in thought. Or is he secretely savouring the whisky fumes from the load he carries?
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A lovely post to accompany my Friday lunch.. let's hope that P Quince's day wincing when he pees will be over soon (nice name - I liked that one ;) ).
Great stuff as always - cracking modelling and a great story to go with it!
Agreed - always a pleasure to read your posts Mikkel - Inspiring modelling, great photography and narratives that make me chuckle :D
Cheers gents. I do realize that this is stretching things to the limit. Basically it's just a flat baseboard and a handful of stock :D. But there's something about flat uncluttered spaces that I really like on a layout. Gives a sense of space, I think. Having said that, it's time to get building again!

Delightful as ever Mikkel.I think Mr Quince needs to see a doctor. :lol: Where do you get your characters names from ? Dickens perhaps ?
Hi Mikkel.
Does Driver P appledore bear a striking resemblance to the mad professor in Back to The Future?
Hmm..

Where do you get your characters names from ? Dickens perhaps ?

Hi Robin, yes some are from Dickens: There are people with hobbies even stranger than ours, who keep extensive lists of characters, eg: http://charlesdicken...characters.html. But as far as I remember P. Quince is a Shakespeare name, and I've forgotten where "Appledore" is from.

Does Driver P appledore bear a striking resemblance to the mad professor in Back to The Future?

Chris, with a certain stretch of the imagination maybe, but it's quite a stretch! :D

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Good to see the Buffalo out doing some work especially with the red wagon. I can't help thinking that someone at Swindon must have been at the whiskey and put the wrong number plate on it, though. Perhaps it was meant to be 1243 which was also a convertible, but was narrow gauge until 1888. 1234 was built as a BG engine and wasn't converted until 1892. Mind you, I've yet to think up a plausible excuse for the post-1899 S4 boiler and three course tanks :unsure:

Nick
Mr Quince would certainly 'wince' if he visited his local doctor for that complaint... The treatment hadn't changed much from the times of his forebears. An injection of mercury in the relevent aperture... (see the relevant syringe in the 'Mary Rose' museum at Portsmouth)(Ohhh nasty!!!).

Lovely modelling as usual Mikkel!

Regs

Ian

Mind you, I've yet to think up a plausible excuse for the post-1899 S4 boiler and three course tanks

Thankyou Nick for once again helping with the detail info. I lack the RCTS volumes, and that is becoming a real problem when it comes to the details of individual engines and the dates particular features were introduced. I was of the impression that the long tanks were introduced in 1876, but did not realize the three courses came so much later. A basic issue of course is that most of my stock is really intended for the 1900s (although I'm sure there are one or two inconsistencies there too!).

Mr Quince would certainly 'wince' if he visited his local doctor for that complaint... The treatment hadn't changed much from the times of his forebears. An injection of mercury in the relevent aperture... (see the relevant syringe in the 'Mary Rose' museum at Portsmouth)(Ohhh nasty!!!).

Very nasty! Unfortunately we do not know if P. Quince learnt his lesson, but it is on record that he stayed on at Farthing station and eventually became a ganger, known for his somewhat cynical view of the world. ;) Here he is 20 years later and looking rather shiny (good thing we have matt varnish).

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Yes, the first full-length tanks were six-course with the later three course tanks fitted from some time in the 1890s. Most were built with S3 boilers which have the dome further forward and the filler was placed between the dome and safety valve. Some acquired S2 boilers during the early 1890s, but many were fitted with the S4 type (as on yours and mine) from about 1894 onwards. I assume the three course tanks were usually fitted at the same time. I did consider building my Gibson kit as an early S2 version, but gave up that idea when I realised how many extra rivets would be needed on the tanks :rolleyes:

Nick
Buffalo has beaten me to the punch!
I looked in the RTCS Broad Gauge book to find 1234 converted to NG in 7/1892 "according to Swindon Records", the autors comment on "some confusion" in other sources.
He knows far more than I do on the types of boiler & saddle tank types!
A real mine-field!
As an aside there is an undated picture of 1229 working as a (NG)0-4-2T having "lost" the rear half of the coupling rods!.
A real mine-field indeed, Don. I didn't mention the five course tanks :blink: There is much more info in the RCTS 'Six-coupled Tanks' volume.
As to the removal of the rear part of the coupling rods, I'm sure I've seen a photo of another example somewhere. I think I read somewhere that it was intended to reduce wear when working on some tightly curved branches, though whether that was the author's guess or based on documentary evidence I don't know.

Nick

...the autors comment on "some confusion" in other sources.

There's my excuse :D.

Funny about the removed rear part of the coupling rods, I was just reading yesterday about the little Barry Railway 0-6-0Ts, of which two had the rear rods removed to work on improvised "autotrains" (in pre-GWR days, that is).

A model of an 0-6-0 converted to a 0-4-2 would be a fairly simple way to do something a bit out of the ordinary.

Welcome to Farthing!

Attached Image: farthing2.jpg

 

This blog chronicles the building of "The Farthing layouts", a series of small OO layouts that portray different sections of a GWR junction station in Edwardian days.

 

Intro and concept
How to eat an elephant
Design principles
State of play

 

Gallery (1900-1904)
Four o'clock blues, ca. 1902
What really happened in the Cuban...
The honourable slipper boy (Part 1)
The honourable slipper boy (Part 2)
The honourable slipper boy (Part 3)

 

Gallery (1904-08)
The trials of Mr Bull
A most implausible arrival
A parcel for Mr Ahern
Blue skies and horse traffic
The Remains of the Day
Motley crew

Edwardian daydreams

 

Gallery (1914)
All in a day's work, Part 1
All in a day's work, Part 2
All in a day's work, Part 3
All in a day's work, Part 4

 

Out of period
Undecided sky (1867)
The sleeping giant (1887)
Bunker first (1927)
Fitted fish and piles (1947)

 

Videos
Once Upon a Time in the West
Summer silliness
The unbearable lightness...
Across the years
The Sidelight Job
Painting coach panels

Traverser testing

 

Coaches
Low-tech pre-grouping stock

Short trains for short layouts
Short trains with a twist
Hand-me-down coaches
Low-tech coach restoration (1)
Low-tech coach restoration (2)
Low-tech coach restoration (3)
Low-tech coach restoration (4)
Low-tech coach restoration (5)

 

Wagons
Sprat & Winkle couplings
3 plank Open in GWR red
Outside Framed 8 Ton Van

In the red: GWR 1900s wagon liveries
In loving memory...
Scratchbuilt one-planker (1)
Scratchbuilt one-planker (2)
MSWJR 3-plank dropside
LSWR 10 ton sliding door van
SDJR Road Van
LSWR stone wagon
Fake news and wagon sheets

 

Locos
GWR 1854 Saddle Tank (1)
GWR 1854 Saddle Tank (2)
Shiny domes and safety valve covers

 

Track
C+L underlay and Carr's ballast
Experiments with C+L track
Comparing track
Messing about with track panels
Laying track on "The depot"

 

Vehicles
GWR horse-drawn trolley
GWR 5-ton horse-drawn vehicle
Parcels van and coal trolley

 

Goods
Fun with crates
Barrels, baskets, bales
Small crates and tea chests

 

Figures
Andrew Stadden 4mm figures
Backdated Monty's figures
Footplate crew
HO figures for an OO layout
Lesser known whitemetal figures

 

Building "The bay"
First bite: "The bay"
Simple structures for "The bay"
Platform trolleys and barrows
Signs, posters and adverts
Six lessons learnt

 

Building "The depot"
Second bite: "The depot"
Shunting Puzzle
Sketches of The depot
Soft body, hard shell
Kit-bashed roof structure
Dry Run
Dusting off the cobwebs
Playing with mirrors
Mezzanine floor
Progress on "The depot"
4mm slate roofing
The treachery of images

A roof for "The depot"

A tall bird from Paddington
Cranes for the depot
Shoulders of giants
Flight of the bumblebee

 

Building "The sidings"
Third bite: "The sidings"
Wagon propulsion
Progress on "The sidings"
Rising from slumber
The Biscuit Shed
A shed and a lock-up
Agricultural merchant's warehouse
Mr Gorbachev, tear down this wall

 

The FSWDC
Railway modelling and Art
Moving Pictures
Season's greetings

 

Layout ideas
A flexible layout
Kicking back in Gloucester

 

Miscellaneous
GWR stables - an overview
Journey to Didcot
Detail hunting at Didcot
Here's looking at you
The mists of time (and all that)
My friend the operating chair
Ready-to-plonk freight
GWR Modelling website

 

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RMweb Workbench
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