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Experiments in Point Rodding (2)

Posted by Ian Smith , in Signalling, Trackwork 19 April 2015 · 1,045 views

Following on from the last instalment, I have finally got around to getting some of the rodding in place on the layout. This is of the round variety, with stools (or stands) at no more than 6'0" (12mm) centres.

The stools (on their bases) were superglued in place alongside the track using a straightish length of 0.25mm nickel silver wire as a guide to getting them in line. Once they were all secure, the wire was removed and rolled repeatedly between two pieces of sheet steel to remove any odd kinks and get a nice straight bit of wire again before a 90 degree bend was made at one end and close to that bend a little joggle inserted to raise the rod from the first angle crank to the level of the stools. It was then a simple matter of applying very little solder at the crank and each stool in turn to secure the wire in the saw cuts of the stools themselves. The two test rods that I've put in so far are for the Up end Up Main/Down Loop turnout and its associated FPL.

The FPL rodding passes beneath the rail in a little channel bored out with a very small dental burr. For this early type of FPL, there was a square section rod connecting (via very small (in 2mm) cranks) the FPL locking mechanism to the lifting bar. I made this by filing 0.5mm wire to a square section and putting a couple of rings on each end to represent the bearings that the square section revolved in. The FPL itself is simply some 0.005" plasticard strip laid along the top of the baulk next to the rail, although I have shied away from any representation of the lifting bar cranks. The reason for making these small components is that for my period of interest these items were painted red by the GWR and will therefore be very noticable if not a feature so I really felt that something other than just the FPL cover in the 4' was needed.

I'm pretty pleased with the results, although it probably doesn't stand the close scrutiny of macro digital photography!! Below are some images of the construction :
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Rodding Stools fixed in place before the rodding attached (although the FPL and switch connection cranks have also been laid)

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A cruel close up

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Rodding being added for the FPL

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Rodding to the FPL and Switch blades in place

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Completed section


I originally had the intention to add some short pieces of wire on top of the stools/rods to represent the top rollers on the stools. All being well I will try adding this refinement on a few stools to ascertain whether or not there is a visual improvement (and also how much extra work will be involved and whether it b***ers up what's there - any lingering with the iron will cause the wire to buckle from expansion!)

Thoughts???

Regards,

Ian
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Looking great Ian! Good to hear your going for the red rodding, I'll be interested to see your interpretation of "Torbay Bright" :-) For what it's worth I think I'd be inclined to leave off the top rollers. It would be a real shame to risk damaging what you've achieved so far. Dave

Looking great Ian! Good to hear your going for the red rodding, I'll be interested to see your interpretation of "Torbay Bright" :-) For what it's worth I think I'd be inclined to leave off the top rollers. It would be a real shame to risk damaging what you've achieved so far. Dave

Dave,

Glad you like it!!  I must admit that I really have no idea what shade of red "Torbay Bright" was, I'm probably going for a weathered Vermillion - I'll be adding a dirty thinners type of wash to each of the rollers and hinge points on each crank anyway to represent the greasing thereof.

 

Having looked at the rodding in the cold light of day, I've convinced myself that trying to add the top rollers will be a step too far in 2mm - mainly because of the risk of damage to the existing rods.  I did find that I had to work from one end when soldering them to the stands as if I went back to one in the middle of already secured ones that the thin wire buckled as it expanded despite a very light touch of the iron.

 

Ian

Very fine work Ian. I think you are right about trying to add the top rollers. Does the expansion problems mean it would be wise to add all the  rodding wires to each stool in turn working away from the box.

When I first joined the 2mm SA thirty years ago the idea of adding all the rodding was never mooted it shows how far some have come.

Don

Very fine work Ian. I think you are right about trying to add the top rollers. Does the expansion problems mean it would be wise to add all the  rodding wires to each stool in turn working away from the box.

When I first joined the 2mm SA thirty years ago the idea of adding all the rodding was never mooted it shows how far some have come.

Don

Don,

 

In this short experiment, I added the run to the switch first (as it was further away from me), then went back and added the FPL run.  Although I managed to get away without the first run becoming looking like a piece of chewed string, I think in future that I will try to do all of the rods on each stool in one go (the most I will have though is 4 rods).  I'm also only doing the rodding in lengths of a few inches - this experiment is about a foot long all told.  (I'm hoping to arrange the butt joints at the stools (but staggering them so that no more than one joint will be at any one stool)).

 

I might try aluminium hair grips as heat sinks either side of the stool being soldered to see if that helps if I have to go back and add a bit more solder to any joints.

 

Ian

Thanks Ian. I have a pair of forceps with a curved end which make a useful heat shunt

Don

Dave,
Glad you like it!!  I must admit that I really have no idea what shade of red "Torbay Bright" was, I'm probably going for a weathered Vermillion - I'll be adding a dirty thinners type of wash to each of the rollers and hinge points on each crank anyway to represent the greasing thereof.
 
 
Ian


Funnily enough "weathered vermillion" was exactly the same colour I had in mind for my rodding:-) It was obviously a different colour from "signal red" or "red oxide" and the "bright" in the colours name makes me think it was probably quite an intense colour. I guess there's no one left alive to tell us that we are wrong!

Very impressive Ian, it all adds up to a very distinctive look. You don't really need to operate any stock on this, there is enough interest in the track and point rodding alone!

Very impressive Ian, it all adds up to a very distinctive look. You don't really need to operate any stock on this, there is enough interest in the track and point rodding alone!

Thank you Mikkel.  One of the main reasons for my wanting to model Baulk Road was for the "ooh, this is different" viewpoint.  Because you don't see it modelled very often (extremely rare in 2mm!!) I think it will generate some interest, and as you say hopefully enough interest not to have to maintain an unrealistic traffic pattern (particularly important when you've only got 2 engines, 4 coaches and about a dozen wagons).  :-)

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