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Lightly weathering the Hornby 20 Ton Brake Van (Almere Road TMD Wagon Stock Update 2)

Posted by Ydna , 03 March 2012 · 876 views

Hi folks. I thought I might share with you my latest weathering project, the BR 20 Ton Brake Van by Hornby.

I purchased this model a month or two back and from the start I got it for a reason... Primarily to pull behind my Break-Down Crane. Yesterday I got round to the 'griming it up' :)

I began by giving giving the model a quick rinse with tap water to aid adhesion of the paint. After it was fully dry, I moved on to what I normally do to brake van / van roofs. I have a very good method which I use, as follows:
  • I start by mottling a very weak (thinned) shade of blacky-grey, grimy paint on with a medium-sized brush. I use Acrylics (primarily because they don't stink the room out like enamels [and other oil-based paints], they dry quicker and the appropriate thinner is water rather than white spirit or suchlike. Water costs nothing and I don't use paint for weathering unless it's thinned).
  • After that has settled on the roof for between 20 seconds and a minute (depending on how much I've thinned it down) I dab what I can off with kitchen-roll. The rule is; the longer you leave the paint on, the more weathered and aged your model roof will look - its as simple as that.
  • Next, I highlight potential rust-prone areas with a bone-dry brush. In the previous entry to this blog I used this technique a huge amount to model scratches in the paintwork of the Rudd ZBV wagon. The way I do it is by mixing some rust-shade paint with another brush, and then I partly ruin the brush I've chosen by spreading out the bristles slightly (it's probably wise to use one of your more aged brushes for this job!). So, once the bristles are bent outwards just dip the ruined brsh in the paint and dab it onto the prone-to-rust areas of the roof. That's it!
I also work on the chassis of course... a chassis never stays black for long, as it is on the model! For the chassis I use rust coloured powders (I produce my powers by crushing orange pastels - a quick way to dispose of old pastels!).

For the body work of the model (which in this brake van's case is steel, I use more powders, but this time a black, grimy mix of pigments.


That's pretty much it for a 20 Tonne brake van of that era.

Below I've attached some pics...

The model before weathering:
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The model after weathering:
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Please give me your thoughts and opinions on this project. If there's any more you think I can add then please suggest it, although I'm not going down the Graffiti route yet! :)

Thanks for viewing... more grime comin' soon.
  • Like x 1





I don't know if the prototype had a plated body but the model you have has a wooden planked body. Still looks good though. One thing I would do is tone down the underframe slightly with a bit of darker brown/black.

I don't know if the prototype had a plated body but the model you have has a wooden planked body. Still looks good though. One thing I would do is tone down the underframe slightly with a bit of darker brown/black.


Thankyou for your advice. I was thinking that the underframe might be a tad over the top too. Thanks again.
Good start. Must finish mine off.

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