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Lamps and Lamplighters

Posted by Mikkel , in The Old Yard, Lamps, Fittings, Figures 04 April 2018 · 401 views

GWR Yard lamps

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Yard lamps have appeared at Farthing, using a mix of scratchbuilt bits, modified parts from old whitemetal lamps, and modified Andrew Stadden figures.



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This is an early GWR platform type, based on old photos I have found. There was also a later, more sturdy variant. Thomas Grig, GWR Yard Porter and lamplighter, is looking a trifle worried. He never did like heights.



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Above is a standard 13ft column lamp. Most GWR yard lamps had hexagonal lamp housing, but the style and decoration of the chimney varied greatly. This one is based on a photo in Vaughan’s "GWR Architecture".



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On some of the taller lamp types, a ladder was fixed permanently at the center. I assume this was safer than using the cross bars.



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The Old Yard at Farthing was formerly a station on the erstwhile N&SJR line. A few of the original lamps survived the GWR takeover, as seen here front left. These are modified from the old Mike' Models range.



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GWR porter Herbert Pocket prepares to clean a lamp. Thanks to Richard whose suggestion inspired this little scene.



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Herbert discovers that the chimney glass is broken. It's a proper mystery how that happened.



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The lamps were cobbled together from various parts in my spares box. Here the post from an old Dart Castings lamp is being modified with cross bars and curly bits from brass wire.



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The glazing on all the lamps was drawn up in Inkscape, then cut and scored on my Silhouette cutter. I used 0,25mm (i.e. 10 thou) PVC glazing from the German “Aeronaut Modellbau” range (ref #7858/32).



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The glazing is simply folded into shape.



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Here is a hexagonal example being folded for the GWR lamps.



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To represent glazing bars, I filled the folding lines with paint and removed the excess. After taking these photos I discovered that it pays to use a darker shade than for the rest of the lamp for this purpose.



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Frosting was initially a problem, as I used Superglue to fix the glazing in place. However, leaving one "window" open helped the fumes escape. The last bit was then fixed with glazing glue. On future lamps, I will see if a more appropriate glue can be used.



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The tops on the GWR lamps were built up using prototype photos, bits from the spares box and some plastic rod. In retrospect it would be better to fashion the lamp top cover from styrene as well, using the cut and fold technique.



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I tried different ways of making the glass chimneys, all with mixed success. I think the most promising way was to use bits cut from "fine glue applicators".



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The glass chimney in evidence. Looks like I didn't fit it straight. Never mind, time to get on with life :-)



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Speaking of life: The lamp attendants were made from Andrew Stadden figures. Their limbs bend fairly easily, another advantage of these great figures. Thomas Grig had his arms and legs bent for a suitable pose.



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Looks like Thomas has made use of a fireman's jacket for the grubby work of tending the lamps.



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Herbert Pocket was made from one of Andrew Stadden's loco crews, which come with separate arms and heads. The photos show how:



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I have enjoyed making these lamps. With further experiments they could probably be refined further, but for now I'm happy with them.



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A final look at Thomas Grig as he surveys the scene. He is in dire need of some equipment for tending that lamp - currently on the workbench.

  • Craftsmanship/Clever x 21
  • Like x 15





Great blog as usual Mikkel.

 

It's good to see a few new pictures of the lamplighters and Farthing is looking really very good with all these details to enhance what you have already achieved.

I never tire of visiting time and time again.

 

Jim

They look splendid Mikkel! Very atmospheric things are lamps and really help to stamp a time and place! I’ve still to sort out any lamps for Sherton Abbas, Modelu have been threatening to scan and produce some for a year or so now, but so far nothing has appeared. Perhaps I should follow your lead, bite the bullet and make my own. If they come out half as well as yours I’ll be very happy! I’ve never seen anyone modelling lamp lighters before, I reckon yours maybe a first:-)
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Northroader
Apr 04 2018 20:56
Excellent work as ever. One thing to query, would you have a lamp placed halfway between the retaining wall and the siding, where it looks as if it’s in the middle of a cart access road?
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nick_bastable
Apr 04 2018 20:59

delightful 

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Southernboy
Apr 04 2018 21:14

Absolutely exquisite and sublime Mikkel:

 

You present a certain dreamlike / collective memory / quality / to your portrayals / which is so edifyingly delightful.

 

I always feel a sense of delight and excitement whenever I click on a link to one of your updates :)

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PaternosterRow
Apr 04 2018 21:16
Research, accuracy and consistency as always. Herbert and Thomas are brilliant studies in figure posing and painting. They turn what would be ordinary lampposts (albeit beautifully made) on a layout into extremely interesting and attractive scenic features. Oh, if I only had your patience, Mikkel. Another master class on how it should be done. Brilliant.

I am very impressed to see the effect that your attention to detail has on your scenes.  You make it look simple but those yard scenes have real atmosphere and I am impressed by your application of photographic depth-of-field techniques to place emphasis on the subject, while hinting at the rest of the world beyond.

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The Great Bear
Apr 04 2018 22:24

Absolutely exquisite and sublime Mikkel:

 

You present a certain dreamlike / collective memory / quality / to your portrayals / which is so edifyingly delightful.

 

I always feel a sense of delight and excitement whenever I click on a link to one of your updates :)

 

Spot on comment

Excellent eye for detail as ever Mikkel.

 

I must get some of Andy variable figures, which you have posed so well. 

 

I'm also glad to see you having fun with the silhouette, I'd be lost without mine these days. 

Looking alright I 'spose ! :)) Do you ever stop man ? Puts a definite stamp on the scene mate and gives real atmos as we've all come to expect from you. Please keep posting ! G
Lovely work as always Mikkel. Thanks for a very useful and informative post.
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cornish trains jez
Apr 05 2018 06:59
Stunning modelling as always Mikel. I always look forward to reading your blog entries.

Best regards,

Jeremy
Excellent work as always Mikkle: I do look forward to the little stories from Farthing Sation. Kind regards, Nick.
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Compound2632
Apr 05 2018 15:52

Very nice. Looking at the plastic tube plug-ins set me wondering: could you actually pipe in gas? You might have to move away from PVC for the glazing, though... Maybe in a larger scale.

Great blog as usual Mikkel.

 

It's good to see a few new pictures of the lamplighters and Farthing is looking really very good with all these details to enhance what you have already achieved.

I never tire of visiting time and time again.

 

Jim

 

Thanks Jim. I'm enjoying the detailing of this layout. Now building wheelbarrows. Sadly there is no standard work on GWR wheelbarrows!  :laugh:

 

 

They look splendid Mikkel! Very atmospheric things are lamps and really help to stamp a time and place! I’ve still to sort out any lamps for Sherton Abbas, Modelu have been threatening to scan and produce some for a year or so now, but so far nothing has appeared. Perhaps I should follow your lead, bite the bullet and make my own. If they come out half as well as yours I’ll be very happy! I’ve never seen anyone modelling lamp lighters before, I reckon yours maybe a first:-)

 

Thanks Dave, yes I did notice Alan mentioned lamps at one point. I think it would be good timing, as some of the whitemetal offerings (in both 4mm and 7mm) are getting a bit long in the tooth now. In any case, some proper Edwardian lamps would look great on Sherton Abbas.

  

 

Excellent work as ever. One thing to query, would you have a lamp placed halfway between the retaining wall and the siding, where it looks as if it’s in the middle of a cart access road?

 

Many thanks Northroader. I did wonder how to place the lamps optimally. As the lamps are currently placed, there is  room for carts to pass on either side of them. I went for this option because (i) if they were close to the tracks it would not be possible for a cart to access a wagon at that point, and (ii) if they were close to the wall it looked silly  :D

delightful 

 

Thanks Nick, I have had my doubts about this layout but it's slowly coming together. 

 

 

Absolutely exquisite and sublime Mikkel:

 

You present a certain dreamlike / collective memory / quality / to your portrayals / which is so edifyingly delightful.

 

I always feel a sense of delight and excitement whenever I click on a link to one of your updates :)

 

Many thanks Mark, I really appreciate that. I have exactly that experience on those (all too rare) occasions when there's an update on Frankland. One of the great thing about model railways is that we work in a strange middle ground between fact and fiction. Even the most exacting P4 layout is an illusion, after all.

 

 

Research, accuracy and consistency as always. Herbert and Thomas are brilliant studies in figure posing and painting. They turn what would be ordinary lampposts (albeit beautifully made) on a layout into extremely interesting and attractive scenic features. Oh, if I only had your patience, Mikkel. Another master class on how it should be done. Brilliant.

 

Thanks Mike! On this layout I'm trying a sort of minimalist approach where the empty spaces aren't filled in with buildings or clutter, but rather just punctuated by a few selected cameos like this. I'm hoping it will give a sense of space while still having points of visual interest. We'll see if it works!

I am very impressed to see the effect that your attention to detail has on your scenes.  You make it look simple but those yard scenes have real atmosphere and I am impressed by your application of photographic depth-of-field techniques to place emphasis on the subject, while hinting at the rest of the world beyond.

 

Thanks Mike. It's funny how sometimes the *lack* of depth of field can be a help when photographing models. I note that there seems to be a least two suns over Farthing though, given the shadows! I imagine you are very experienced in working with depth of field, given your other interests. That must be useful for the modelling too. 

 

 

Spot on comment

 

Many thanks Bear. I sometimes wonder if Farthing is a bit "twee". I suppose it is, but I'm addicted to GWR stone!

 

 

Excellent eye for detail as ever Mikkel.

 

I must get some of Andy variable figures, which you have posed so well. 

 

I'm also glad to see you having fun with the silhouette, I'd be lost without mine these days. 

 

Hi John, thanks, yes Andy's figures are really proving their worth I think. The Silhouette too. I expect it will only become more useful as the technology develops - if it is not made completely redundant by 3D printing!

Looking alright I 'spose ! :)) Do you ever stop man ? Puts a definite stamp on the scene mate and gives real atmos as we've all come to expect from you. Please keep posting ! G

 

Ha ha, thanks Grahame. I'm enjoying my 20 minute routine every morning before going to work. Little steps every day. Plus, it prevents me from impatiently rushing ahead with things  :)

 

 

Lovely work as always Mikkel. Thanks for a very useful and informative post.

 

Many thanks Chris. Glad that it's of use. As I have discovered, GWR lamps varied greatly in style. I suspect it was the same on the Brighton. I actually have some LB&SCR 7mm lamps from Duncan's Models, but that's another story.

 

 

Stunning modelling as always Mikel. I always look forward to reading your blog entries.

Best regards,

Jeremy

 

Thanks Jeremy. I'm working on an overall trackplan that will incorporate the different Farthings layout - but I'm afraid it will never be able to compete with Euston's! :-) 

Excellent work as always Mikkle: I do look forward to the little stories from Farthing Sation. Kind regards, Nick.


Thanks Nick. The lamplighters are obvious candidates for a detective story I think!

Very nice. Looking at the plastic tube plug-ins set me wondering: could you actually pipe in gas? You might have to move away from PVC for the glazing, though... Maybe in a larger scale.


Thank you Stephen, that is an... interesting idea :-) If you don't mind I will leave it to you to experiment with that.... :laugh:
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Compound2632
Apr 06 2018 09:05

Your attempt at psychological manipulation may lead me to doubt my own sanity...

Ha ha, actually you've got me thinking about lighter gas and O scale lamps... Or a working oil lamp! This leads me to ponder something I have never thought about before: What is the minimum possible size of a natural flame?
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Compound2632
Apr 06 2018 17:38

In the context of model gas lamps, the limiting factor is probably the bore of the tube or nozzle - there's likely to be a minimum at which adequate gas flow can be maintained. Molecules don't scale.

Absolutely delightful read and pictures Mikkel.

Some beautiful modelling and tenacity.

Always a pleasure to get an update on Farthing :yes:

In the context of model gas lamps, the limiting factor is probably the bore of the tube or nozzle - there's likely to be a minimum at which adequate gas flow can be maintained. Molecules don't scale.

 

Yes, and there is also the question if it would look right. As we know, the worst medium for modelling water is water!

Absolutely delightful read and pictures Mikkel.

Some beautiful modelling and tenacity.

Always a pleasure to get an update on Farthing :yes:

 

Thanks Pete. On the topic of tenacity, I've found it a useful substitute for lack of skill :-)

Mikkel,

Lack of skill?  I think not!

 

Just what everyone else has said about your update.  It is not only clever it is also have the ability to see things differently.  Those little cameos are genius.  The only problem with them is that if anyone else does it they will be accused of copying you, even if they had a signalman/boy up a ladder polishing the glass or relighting the lamp.

 

My wife says that you must have all your modelling out all the time as it takes me about 20 minutes just to get started.

 

All the best

Just delightfully superb

Mikkel,

Lack of skill?  I think not!

 

Just what everyone else has said about your update.  It is not only clever it is also have the ability to see things differently.  Those little cameos are genius.  The only problem with them is that if anyone else does it they will be accused of copying you, even if they had a signalman/boy up a ladder polishing the glass or relighting the lamp.

 

My wife says that you must have all your modelling out all the time as it takes me about 20 minutes just to get started.

 

All the best

 

Hi Chris, many thanks. Fortunately there is no copyright in railway modelling. How about some lamplighters at Traeth Mawr? 

 

Your wife is right, it's very convenient to have a modelling table in the basement that you can go to and fro. I'll miss it when we move (if anyone ever decides to buy our house!). 

 

Just delightfully superb

 

Thanks John, I think one of the great things about modelling is that we can zoom in and out from large projects to small ones like this. The enjoyment is the same, I find.

Mikkel,

I am a long way of making a station let alone the lamps but I think I may have someone polishing the lenses on the signals.

Mikkel,
I am a long way of making a station let alone the lamps but I think I may have someone polishing the lenses on the signals.


Great idea, Chris. Getting people up and away from the ground adds a bit of extra visual interest, I feel.

Welcome to Farthing!

Attached Image: farthing2.jpg

 

This blog chronicles the building of "The Farthing layouts", a series of small OO layouts that portray different sections of a GWR junction station in Edwardian days.

 

Intro and concept
How to eat an elephant
Design principles
State of play

 

Gallery (1900-1904)
Four o'clock blues, ca. 1902
What really happened in the Cuban...
The honourable slipper boy (Part 1)
The honourable slipper boy (Part 2)
The honourable slipper boy (Part 3)

 

Gallery (1904-08)
The trials of Mr Bull
A most implausible arrival
A parcel for Mr Ahern
Blue skies and horse traffic
The Remains of the Day
Motley crew

Edwardian daydreams

 

Gallery (1914)
All in a day's work, Part 1
All in a day's work, Part 2
All in a day's work, Part 3
All in a day's work, Part 4

 

Out of period
Undecided sky (1867)
The sleeping giant (1887)
Bunker first (1927)
Fitted fish and piles (1947)

 

Videos
Once Upon a Time in the West
Summer silliness
The unbearable lightness...
Across the years
The Sidelight Job
Painting coach panels

Traverser testing

 

Coaches
Low-tech pre-grouping stock

Short trains for short layouts
Short trains with a twist
Hand-me-down coaches
Low-tech coach restoration (1)
Low-tech coach restoration (2)
Low-tech coach restoration (3)
Low-tech coach restoration (4)
Low-tech coach restoration (5)

 

Wagons
Sprat & Winkle couplings
3 plank Open in GWR red
Outside Framed 8 Ton Van

In the red: GWR 1900s wagon liveries
In loving memory...
Scratchbuilt one-planker (1)
Scratchbuilt one-planker (2)
MSWJR 3-plank dropside
LSWR 10 ton sliding door van
SDJR Road Van
LSWR stone wagon
Fake news and wagon sheets
Same but different: 1900s wagons

 

Locos
GWR 1854 Saddle Tank (1)
GWR 1854 Saddle Tank (2)
Shiny domes and safety valve covers
Backdating the Oxford Dean Goods (1)

 

Track
C+L underlay and Carr's ballast
Experiments with C+L track
Comparing track
Messing about with track panels
Laying track on "The depot"

 

Vehicles
GWR horse-drawn trolley
GWR 5-ton horse-drawn vehicle
Parcels van and coal trolley

 

Goods
Fun with crates
Barrels, baskets, bales
Small crates and tea chests

 

Figures
Andrew Stadden 4mm figures
Backdated Monty's figures
Footplate crew
HO figures for an OO layout
Lesser known whitemetal figures

 

Constructing the Branch Bay
First bite: "The bay"
Simple structures for "The bay"
Platform trolleys and barrows
Signs, posters and adverts
Six lessons learnt

 

Constructing the Goods Depot
Second bite: "The depot"
Shunting Puzzle
Sketches of The depot
Soft body, hard shell
Kit-bashed roof structure
Dry Run
Dusting off the cobwebs
Playing with mirrors
Mezzanine floor
Progress on "The depot"
4mm slate roofing
The treachery of images

A roof for "The depot"

A tall bird from Paddington
Cranes for the depot
Shoulders of giants
Flight of the bumblebee

 

Constructing the Old Yard
Third bite: "The sidings"
Wagon propulsion
Progress on "The sidings"
Rising from slumber
The Biscuit Shed
A shed and a lock-up
Agricultural merchant's warehouse
Mr Gorbachev, tear down this wall
Stops, levers, plates, gauge, wall
Lamps and Lamplighters

 

Constructing the Stables
GWR Park Royal stable block
GWR stables - an overview

 

The FSWDC
Railway modelling and Art
Moving Pictures
Season's greetings

 

Layout ideas
A flexible layout
Kicking back in Gloucester

 

Miscellaneous
Pre-grouping livery clippings
Journey to Didcot
Detail hunting at Didcot
Here's looking at you
The mists of time (and all that)
My friend the operating chair
Ready-to-plonk freight
GWR Modelling website

 

More
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