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Castle Aching

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#7376 Edwardian

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Posted Yesterday, 14:04

Work on timing and knowing what to expect. Do you have the Letts (or similar) practice papers?

 

Is she the elder or younger? It's worse for the second if the first passed - the pressure's on.

 

In my experience, those who are crammed by expensive tutors generally don't do so well in the long run, compared to those who get through on their own wits*. I'd ban the tutoring - but there is so much parental anxiety around these days.

 

*Like my two boys ;)

 

Just past papers from the interweb.  Exam technique/timing is so far poor.

 

Second. Problem.

 

We may well be snowed in again tomorrow, as it has been snowing here all day so far.

 

The camera gives the impression of a few flakes, but it looks more like a curtain in reality!

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#7377 Caley Jim

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Posted Yesterday, 14:47

We may well be snowed in again tomorrow, as it has been snowing here all day so far.

 

The camera gives the impression of a few flakes, but it looks more like a curtain in reality!

It was snowing heavily here earlier and put an inch or so onto my nice clear driveway, but it has stopped now and it looks as though there is a bit of a thaw now.  Hang on in there, James. It may not be all that bad (on both the snow and exam fronts).   :declare:

 

Jim


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#7378 Donw

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Posted Yesterday, 15:39

Look on the bright side, if you are snowed in you can spend the time coaching your daughter. To my mind the best form of coaching is to let her show you whats she knows and help to boost her confidence. You showing her what she doesn't know ( even if intended to add to her knowledge) will only dent it. Just my thoughts.

If you are likely to have problems getting snowed in is there somewhere you could leave a car close to the road (e.g. a barn or a friends house) even if it means a half mile trudge to get to the car it may actually let you drive once reached.

 

Don

 

edit assuming the road will be plowed. 


Edited by Donw, Yesterday, 15:40 .

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#7379 Edwardian

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Posted Yesterday, 16:15

Look on the bright side, if you are snowed in you can spend the time coaching your daughter. To my mind the best form of coaching is to let her show you whats she knows and help to boost her confidence. You showing her what she doesn't know ( even if intended to add to her knowledge) will only dent it. Just my thoughts.

If you are likely to have problems getting snowed in is there somewhere you could leave a car close to the road (e.g. a barn or a friends house) even if it means a half mile trudge to get to the car it may actually let you drive once reached.

 

Don

 

edit assuming the road will be plowed. 

 

A good idea.  Alas, our steep and impassable lane ends abruptly on a very busy main road, with nowhere we could leave it.


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#7380 Northroader

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Posted Yesterday, 16:31

(The friendly/supportive is intended for her)
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#7381 Les le Breton

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Posted Yesterday, 17:05

Work on timing and knowing what to expect. Do you have the Letts (or similar) practice papers?

 

Is she the elder or younger? It's worse for the second if the first passed - the pressure's on.

 

In my experience, those who are crammed by expensive tutors generally don't do so well in the long run, compared to those who get through on their own wits*. I'd ban the tutoring - but there is so much parental anxiety around these days.

 

*Like my two boys ;)

I.M.H.O. the 11 plus is a hateful way of dividing children into two groups for life, successful and failure. What follows is extra funding for the successful and not enough for the failures.

 

The trouble with having an open mind, of course, is that people will insist on coming along and trying to put things in it


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#7382 Nearholmer

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Posted Yesterday, 17:31

Where we live is a ‘comprehensive’ area, but has historic links to a ‘grammar’ area, with a few places available, and a longish coach trip to get there.

The few places mean that it is 11+++ to secure one (what the ++ are is a mystery to all except the selectors!), with hefty cramming a prerequisite.

My son’s best pal is being crammed, and is convinced he will be going to grammar. My son doesn’t want to even try for it, because he doesn’t want to commute to school, and although I’d sort of like him to sit 11+, because I’m confident in him, and think it would add to his self-confidence, I’m not distressed, because I’m firmly ‘agin’ cramming, and, fortunately, the best of the comps have a good record.

My main concern is that his sport vs book-learning emphasis is about 97:3 at the moment!

Kevin (from the bench at badminton class)

Edited by Nearholmer, Yesterday, 17:32 .

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#7383 corneliuslundie

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Posted Yesterday, 17:43

I'd agree in general with the comments about the 11+, cramming and helping your daughter. One thing which would be useful for her is if she can understand the kind of answers the examiners are expecting, ie if it is something taken out of a hat it must be a rabbit even if it looks nothing like one; and squirrels of course eat only nuts regardless of what she may have observed in the real world.

Jonathan


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#7384 Compound2632

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Posted Yesterday, 18:38

I.M.H.O. the 11 plus is a hateful way of dividing children into two groups for life, successful and failure. What follows is extra funding for the successful and not enough for the failures.

 

 

I'm glad not to live in one of those counties such as Kent and Bucks that still have the full two-tier system. In our case, the two state selective schools (boys and girls) are very small perturbations in an otherwise county-wide comprehensive system; their survival within the state system is something of an anomaly and they certainly don't get preferential funding. I'm afraid I'm a bit of an Old Labour hypocrite: one may believe in an ideal comprehensive system that provides every child with the appropriate opportunities but given the imperfect nature of our current system, one may as well take advantage of the opportunities it provides. I would be improper here to enter the state/independent debate; I'll confine myself to observing that boarding in the sixth form at a leading public school was a positive life experience for my three nieces. 


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#7385 Edwardian

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Posted Yesterday, 21:20

It's an entrance exam, so, actually, it's a hateful way of dividing middle class parents between those with new cars and foreign holidays and those who pay school fees and live like peasants.


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#7386 Caley Jim

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Posted Yesterday, 22:07

I am eternally grateful that up here neither my children nor grandchildren have had, or will have, to go through any selection process between primary and secondary school.

 

Jim



#7387 Compound2632

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Posted Yesterday, 22:18

I am eternally grateful that up here neither my children nor grandchildren have had, or will have, to go through any selection process between primary and secondary school.

 

Jim

 

Ah the bed of nails we English have made for ourselves.



#7388 TheQ

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Posted Today, 13:58

Considering my grandfather a ganger (plus my grand mother of course) got their children through a state primary school and all three children through to grammar school I can't quite support the above comments. I failed My 11+ due to my hand writing ( a change of primary schools and methods of writing ruined mine) and one sister went to grammar school, till they got rid of them. My brother and other sister didn't get the chance.

If you go to a modern large secondary the first thing they do is stream you, so that you are effectively split up as though one lot is grammar and the others as secondary moderns. But if you are in  a small school you could be lumbered with trying to learn in a class full of idiots..

 

 The grammar School system had the advantage that if the child was bright enough ( and more importantly, given parental encouragement), then he / she could go places. In many cases today the Bright child is ignored in the back of the class, while they spend all their time trying to get those not as well endowed with brain power, through exams raise average school exam passes..

 

The one thing wrong was allocating a higher percentage of money to grammar schools..


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#7389 AVS1998

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Posted Today, 17:09

When it came to my selection for my secondary education, it was a complex decision;

 

I could stay in Leeds, and go to either of the local community colleges (both of which became academies shortly after I began my tenure at one of them).

 

Or I could stay with my grandparents in York and go to Joseph Rowntree Comprehensive, an... alright school, and one where I had many friends from when I lived in York as a little girl.

 

Another option was to apply for the bursary for the public schools in the area, Queen Ethelberga's and Queen Mary's; suffice to say, whilst I dreamt, I did not achieve, and thus ended up attending the community college/academy/identity crisis school.

 

And I have to say, it was the worst five years of my life. In spite of being in the top sets for the academic subjects, I was still very much limited by the attitudes of other pupils who may have had the ability but sadly lacked in the behavior one would associate with such academia.

 

As my GCSEs rolled around and the time came to apply for post-sixteen education, I decided to apply to a college rather than remain in the school I had been attending. The A level courses on offer had been totally cut back at my school as a result of people not applying to study them; languages only just scraped through. Performing arts and art were totally cut. Home Economics, too. P.E. barely managed to cling on. I think they had to combine English Language and Literature; everyone in my year just seemed to be more scientifically minded and I believe a great many of my classmates have gone on to study a science.

 

But yes, I applied to a college, a Catholic college, and it was the best two years of my life. Our campus was in amongst the Leeds universities (don't forget the city has three) and I was surrounded by positivity and support. It's one decision I do not regret. But again, I was in a muddle when it came to applying for my A level studies as to where to go.

 

I could go to the school's sixth form (not bloody likely.)

 

York College was an option; there was a bus early on a morning, the train, or I could live with my grandparents during the week. Unfortunately, because we fell just inside a distance-calculated bursary zone (how daft) I wasn't eligible for the travel bursary, which knocked that idea on the head.

 

Leeds City College didn't appeal on any level, and I'll admit to snobbery on my own part here. Having already attended a Comprehensive-turned-''academy'', I didn't want to be in yet another concrete building surrounded by people who didn't share my passions, and thus I ended up at the red-brick Victorian Catholic college in the heart of the city. But, it was a decision which set me up for life.

 

Outstanding Oftsted time after time, a high number of Oxbridge students, and 88% average A*-C A level results? How could you not apply?

 

After moving down south for university, it's really hit home just how much ''easier'' education is back up north; when I was living in Hastings I had two housemates from around Northampton/Bedford way, and they both attended the triple school (primary, middle, senior) system, which also had a grammar school flow- I couldn't comprehend it. We just had primary, secondary, and it was decided in the first year or so if you were 'thick' (lowest sets), 'capable' (Middle) or 'Gifted and Talented' (snotty, over-pushed and entitled).

 

In Ashford, we have two grammar schools, two further secondary schools and a college, with some courses also offered in correlation with Folkestone college. But I've been on the slow train to London many a time seeing entire carriages packed out with grammar school students studying in Tonbridge. Even Hastings has Buckswood, a 4-18 public school, which offers a bus service daily.

 

I honestly cannot get my head around it.

 

It's a very divisive subject. On the one hand, I've nothing against so-called segregation in order to benefit students among their own abilities; on the other, I've been told by teachers that mixed-ability classes are designed to have pupils learn from one another and be supported by each other. I don't know about that...

 

Grammar schools- the most obvious symbol of classism in Britain?

 

- Alex



#7390 Edwardian

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Posted Today, 17:16

I wouldn't wish my education on anyone.  So I haven't.

 

Well, it snowed and it snowed yesterday.  Even the Mem gave up on the outdoor life and spent Sunday afternoon on the sofa boxsetting (my family tell me that is a word, and a 'thing').

 

Then it stopped.

 

And didn't start again all night.  And thawed.

 

So, I bunked off for 4 or 5 hours today to make a brief, but highly enjoyable rendezvous with a leading member of the CA Parish, who, very nobly travelled half way to meet me, and who, incidentally, has proposed a Parish Meeting in Castle Acre at some point.  Something to think about there, for a warmer season.

 

As a consequence, I am now in possession of a rather dilapidated former Great Western BLT, once evidently set by the sea at the once delightful, but now rather faded, Welsh village of 'Aberdaron', for so sayeth the running in board. More on this to follow.


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#7391 Nearholmer

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Posted Today, 17:30

The topic of schooling, which to me is slightly different from education, is massively divisive, so might it be safer for the peace of CA if we stuck to the iniquities of Edwardian schooling?
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#7392 Compound2632

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Posted Today, 17:50

The topic of schooling, which to me is slightly different from education, is massively divisive, so might it be safer for the peace of CA if we stuck to the iniquities of Edwardian schooling?

 

On that front, I can thoroughly recommend the school at Beamish Museum.


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#7393 nick_bastable

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Posted Today, 17:51

The topic of schooling, which to me is slightly different from education, is massively divisive, so might it be safer for the peace of CA if we stuck to the iniquities of Edwardian schooling?

so that a be caning and dunces hats ....


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#7394 Regularity

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Posted Today, 17:57

The topic of schooling, which to me is slightly different from education, is massively divisive, so might it be safer for the peace of CA if we stuck to the iniquities of Edwardian schooling?

I agree, but my thought about the grammar schools was that they were ok, but the secondary moderns weren’t so good, and rather than fix the 80% which wasn’t working, we threw out the 20% which was. Typically English!

The following is a paraphrase of a comment made to me many years ago by a well-known Modeller who was once a teacher, and active in the profession during the period of change from grammar schools to comprehensives. The only group of people who really pushed for the abolition of grammar schools was not the parents, not the politicians (a large number of whom had come through the grammar school system), nor the kids who went to grammar schools. It was the teaching unions, 80% of whose members felt that secondary modern schools were not valued and that they were therefore viewed as second class teachers.

I think it just reflects that we don’t value practical intelligence as much as we do book intelligence. I have too many phenomenally clever friends who fared badly at school because they frankly never got the point of algebra, etc. I also don’t think that formal academically based education is the answer to everything. Getting a degree at 21 in most subjects simply meant one had basic qualifications for an academic career (if you got a first), an aptitude for more specialised training (if you got an upper second) or an office job (everyone else). Compare that with a 21 year old who had just finished an apprenticeship: basic training in technical skills, which would involve thinking and doing with an emphasis on the latter. Other than one route led to a minority going into research, they basically only differed in whether people ended up on the factory floor or the office upstairs.

All are equally important.
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#7395 Regularity

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Posted Today, 18:01

Here’s the difference between education, training and schooling...

If your 14 year old daughter comes home from school and says she is doing sex education, you are happy.
If she came home say was doing sex training, you would be extremely worried.
If she said she was being schooled in the arts of sex, you’d call the police...
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#7396 uax6

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Posted Today, 18:37

I think a parish meeting in Castle Acre would be a very good idea, should there be a pre-requisite that we have to enter the Dodo and say loudly something like ' The Wolferingham train was packed with pyramids this morning' to show that we are a parishioner?

Andy g
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