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BRM August '17 + FREE DVD

scenery barmouth junction corwenna forth bridge st merryn hattons warwell janus




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#1 Steve1980

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Posted 14 July 2017 - 13:33

Hi all,

 

The August 2017 issue of BRM is now available to download as a Digital Edition. Apologies to anyone who downloaded the magazine on July 13th and the morning of the 14th - the issue mistakenly went live early, with a number of errors waiting to be fixed. Please re-download for the latest version. This month's Digital Edition includes extra images, extra video, a free copy of Garden Rail and live website links!

 

As you may notice from the cover, this month's magazine is a Scenery Special, full of the best scenery advice from experts like Michael Russell, David Wright and Phil Parker. You'll also find a varied selection of top quality layouts in a number of gauges/scales - see below for a full list of what to expect in this month's magazine and on your FREE DVD (the DVD footage is included within the Digital Edition). The print copy goes on-sale on Thursday, July 20th. Enjoy.

 

Steve

 

BRM.png        aug_17.jpg

 

 

ON THIS MONTH’S DVD

 

-          Johnstown Road layout

-          Add hedges to your layout

-          Simple painting techniques

-          A look at new Train-Tech products

 

INSIDE OUR SCENERY SPECIAL

 

Layouts

Barmouth Junction (OO) – Leading our scenery special, take a trip along the windswept Welsh coastline in Geoff Taylor’s stunning scene.

Corwenna (OO) – Phil Waterfield’s layout is an impressive depiction of the China clay drying process.

St.Merryn (P4) – Picture postcards from 1950s Cornwall in an imaginative layout made by a group of modellers.

The Bridge (T) – Doug Kightley’s interpretation of Forth Bridge is a masterpiece of T gauge modelling

Lea Siding (G3) – Detail takes priority in this siding diorama, showing that Gauge 3 doesn’t have to be confined for the garden.

 

Expert Advice

How to correct common modelling mistakes

Make a football pitch

Planting telegraph poles

Create a perfect British Oak Tree

Paint a convincing backscene

Improve a standard card kit

Model a realistic boat club scene

Building Big Bertha

 

News & Reviews

Read all about Dapol’s Banana Van and Oxford Rail’s Warwell wagon

Reviewed: Oxford Diecast’s Janus 0-6-0

Reviewed: Hatton’s Warwell

 

Plus…

Beating Lickey Incline – the most infamous gradient on the British railway network

Prototype Inspiration: Janus 0-6-0 locomotive

Tail Lamp



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#2 Andy Y

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Posted 15 July 2017 - 11:57

For me, it's a pleasure to feature another portion of Geoff Taylor's wonderful Cambrian empire; in my opinion one of the best model railways in the country. Not necessarily because of what you see within the article, which is part of the larger whole, but for the sheer wonder of how it can be operated to a working timetable tieing together the multiple locations of Barmouth Junction, Penmaenpool and Dolgelley extending to the rest of the network with yards representing Barmouth, Ruabon and Machynlleth. It's a real challenge to keep up with the operating timetable in real time as a few readers who have been lucky enough to operate the layout will know.

 

The digital edition of the magazine features loads of extra images; it's too easy to get carried away with the camera on a visit.

 

Feature_8.jpg

 

Feature_26.jpg

 

 


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#3 Clearwater

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Posted 15 July 2017 - 15:13

A good issue but I particularly enjoyed Phil Parker's "rescue" article. We've all made mistakes and to read how to make the best of them was insightful.

David
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#4 STRAT'71

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Posted 16 July 2017 - 22:02

I have just subscribed for 13 issues of the digital version. Great value.

As I am more used to buying hard copies, I was worried about the read quality. No problems, even on my phone, using the pinch and zoom features, the experience is great.

Recommend it to anybody.


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#5 Steve1980

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Posted 17 July 2017 - 16:01

I have just subscribed for 13 issues of the digital version. Great value.

As I am more used to buying hard copies, I was worried about the read quality. No problems, even on my phone, using the pinch and zoom features, the experience is great.

Recommend it to anybody.

 

Thanks. We're getting loads of positive comments about our Digital Editions. It makes all of our hard work worthwhile.



#6 kirtleypete

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Posted 19 July 2017 - 17:34

I used to love reading 'Tail lamp', but not any more. 

 

Peter


Edited by kirtleypete, 19 July 2017 - 17:34 .


#7 Phil Parker

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Posted 20 July 2017 - 08:06

I used to love reading 'Tail lamp', but not any more.

 

Go on, give us a clue - what is it about "Tail Lamp" you don't like? What would you like to see in there?

 

For what it's worth, I really enjoyed the latest issue. Well written and with some interesting angles on the hobby. However, we did shake the feature up a bit and so a bit of feedback is always welcome. 



#8 kirtleypete

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Posted 20 July 2017 - 11:50

Phil, it's gone from being written by one of the leading lights in the industry, with fascinating insights into what's involved in developing RTR models, to being written by the work experience boy.

 

Which one do you expect me to find more interesting?!

​Peter


Edited by kirtleypete, 20 July 2017 - 11:50 .


#9 cravensdmufan

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Posted 20 July 2017 - 12:18

Picked up my copy from local newsagents this morning.

 

The painted backscenes on Barmouth Junction are absolutely superb - quite the best I've ever seen I think!  And just look at the weathering on the station building and platform. Stunning.

 

Well photographed Andy.


Edited by cravensdmufan, 20 July 2017 - 12:51 .

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#10 eddie reffin

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Posted 20 July 2017 - 12:46

I am afraid I have to agree about the Tail Lamp section.

It makes a number of views about DCC which are, at best, misguided. "Money no object". Sorry, but DCC doesn't need to cost the earth. As for the comment about DCC layouts not as good scenically, that is just not true. The use of DCC has no real correlation to scenic standards. Seen some really ropey DC layouts at our national show here in Scotland , whilst some of the best current layouts are operated by DCC.

As a subscriber, I am looking for the best quality writing possible in the magazine. As previously mentioned, Phil Parker's article on recovering damage was superb and these sorts of pieces will inspire more people to have a go, knowing that if a mistake is made, not all is lost!

Cheers
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#11 Phil Parker

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Posted 20 July 2017 - 12:48

Phil, it's gone from being written by one of the leading lights in the industry, with fascinating insights into what's involved in developing RTR models, to being written by the work experience boy.

 

Which one do you expect me to find more interesting?!

​Peter

 

Both. 

 

They offer different viewpoints, as have several other writers on the page including those who are also experts within the hobby. Tail Lamp was given a shake up as many people felt it was becoming a bit stale - there is only so much inside information you can get without revealing commercially sensitive numbers. That's not going to happen so eventually the well will run dry.

 

For the future of the hobby, gaining an insight into a young modellers thinking has got to be important, unless you consider that we need no new entrants in the hobby. It's also a one-off with many other relevant people to following in the coming months.


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#12 john new

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Posted 20 July 2017 - 13:03

I can't see how DCC can make one jot of a difference to scenic treatment either other than perhaps the ability to add gimmicks. As for the cost debate I guess it depends on where you are starting from - commencing from a standing start of zero kit possibly not much difference, but for a low budget modeller with existing analogue stock and control gear converting to DCC certainly adds a premium. 

 

For me, I'm not bothered with sound so will stick with analogue for the present; that premium isn't worth it, for others sound and other extras will be desirable and they will pay it. Recent polls suggest my view is becoming the smaller segment although possibly larger than the on-line poll %s suggest as you have to be an IT regular to complete the polls.


Edited by john new, 20 July 2017 - 13:05 .

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#13 Grafarman

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Posted 21 July 2017 - 08:21

For me, it's a pleasure to feature another portion of Geoff Taylor's wonderful Cambrian empire; in my opinion one of the best model railways in the country. Not necessarily because of what you see within the article, which is part of the larger whole, but for the sheer wonder of how it can be operated to a working timetable tieing together the multiple locations of Barmouth Junction, Penmaenpool and Dolgelley extending to the rest of the network with yards representing Barmouth, Ruabon and Machynlleth. It's a real challenge to keep up with the operating timetable in real time as a few readers who have been lucky enough to operate the layout will know.

 

The digital edition of the magazine features loads of extra images; it's too easy to get carried away with the camera on a visit.

 

attachicon.gifFeature_8.jpg

 

attachicon.gifFeature_26.jpg

 

Just wondering if you happened to take any shots of the layout in its entirety ie. including 'off-stage' or from across the room?  Would love to see how Geoff managed to include the plan for the various sections and how it all fits together... 

 

 

David



#14 Andy Y

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Posted 21 July 2017 - 08:25

Just wondering if you happened to take any shots of the layout in its entirety ie. including 'off-stage' or from across the room?  Would love to see how Geoff managed to include the plan for the various sections and how it all fits together... 

 

 

David

 

The best I can offer is a schematic showing how the parts fit together.

 

post-1-0-05033300-1498326552_thumb.jpg

 

It's not possible to stand far enough back to get decent wider shots and if you are looking at one scene you can't actually see any of the others (unless you are standing in between Barmouth Junction and the Abergwynant scene).


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#15 Grafarman

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Posted 21 July 2017 - 10:53

The best I can offer is a schematic showing how the parts fit together.

 

post-1-0-05033300-1498326552_thumb.jpg

 

It's not possible to stand far enough back to get decent wider shots and if you are looking at one scene you can't actually see any of the others (unless you are standing in between Barmouth Junction and the Abergwynant scene).

 

Thank you; that does make things a lot clearer!  Quite a system really; never would have thought of linking them up like that...

 

David



#16 Andy Y

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Posted 21 July 2017 - 11:13

Quite a system really; never would have thought of linking them up like that...

 

And that's a simplified diagram; the Ruabon storage sidings are actually beneath Penmaenpool. It's a good job that Geoff's systems, trackwork and electrics are very reliable. An alert system is being constructed at the moment so that a prompt can be given to the operator responsible for accepting a train (and driving it out from the previous section/scene) that the train's ready for moving on - at present there are good-natured verbal reminders given when someone's not paying attention down the line.


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#17 chrisf

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Posted 21 July 2017 - 12:18

Thumbs up from me too for the coverage of Barmouth Junction.  It reminds me of how things were done when I was a kid, a L O N G time ago, but then every effort was made to fill the available space with stations, yards, sheds, towns and heaven knows what else [Edward Beal's West Midland, anyone?].  Geoff has done it it properly, with the main stage of Barmouth Junction and the subsidiary stages of Penmaenpool, Dolgelley and Abergwynant duly separated from it.  No-one can do everything at once and it will be interesting to see what he tackles next.

 

Elsewhere in the magazine I was very taken with Michael Russell's trees.  Some years ago I was shown another method at a show and just could not get it right.  The layout will need some trees one day and the method in BRM is well worth a try.  Tony Wright's Big Bertha surely deserves to be described as a masterclass.  Each stage is explained clearly and illustrated appropriately.  The important lesson which comes across is not to assume that a kit is 100% accurate or contains everything needed [been there, done it].  I wonder how long it took Tony to complete what he built?

 

I was quite taken with Phil [not Pete!] Waterfield's Corwenna.  Just as you think that china clay has been done to death as a theme, along comes another variant - Trerice but with space.  Nice one!  What impressed me most was something not mentioned in the text, namely the use of Peco couplings.  How wonderfully unobtrusive they are compared with those wretched tension lock things that pervade the hobby rather like Japanese knotweed.  Was the author too modest to mention them or was the relevant sentence pruned for reasons of space?

 

With one reservation, well done for the way St Merryn is featured.  This is one of my favourite layouts and Tony Wright's pictures have truly captured it at its best.  The idea of sepia tinted photographs is a clever one but don't overdo it in future.  Having taken the trouble to include a photograph of the team, surely it should have been complemented by naming those in it.  Credit where it is due, please.  From left to right: Eddie Bourne, Steve Carter, Brian Self, Chris McCarthy and Bob Bourne.

 

Oh yes, the DVD.  27 minutes of screen time is not as miserly as some have been and I found Phil's piece on hedges interesting [guess what, the layout needs some new hedges].  I was disappointed, given some of the gems that have been included in Extras in the past, to find merely another recommendation to try the digital issue.   #anticlimax.

 

Chris


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#18 Waterloo

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Posted 21 July 2017 - 16:22

 
With one reservation, well done for the way St Merryn is featured.  This is one of my favourite layouts and Tony Wright's pictures have truly captured it at its best.  The idea of sepia tinted photographs is a clever one but don't overdo it in future.  Having taken the trouble to include a photograph of the team, surely it should have been complemented by naming those in it.  Credit where it is due, please.  From left to right: Eddie Bourne, Steve Carter, Brian Self, Chris McCarthy and Bob Bourne.
 
 
Chris


Thanks Chris

BRM did not name the team because I didn't provide them with the names!
'St Merryn' is a group effort so we wanted any credit to go to the South London Area Group not just those featured in the photograph.

Cheers

Steve
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#19 Chris M

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Posted 22 July 2017 - 10:05

Sounds rather low in N gauge this month. I know it's hard to appeal to everyone but BRM does not have enough N for me to buy regularly.
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#20 Phil Parker

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Posted 22 July 2017 - 10:18

Sounds rather low in N gauge this month. I know it's hard to appeal to everyone but BRM does not have enough N for me to buy regularly.

 

Most of the techniques used are multi-scale. The footbridge and boat club and hedges I've built will work in any - it's just easier to photograph them in 4mm.



#21 Andy Y

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Posted 22 July 2017 - 10:38

Sounds rather low in N gauge this month. I know it's hard to appeal to everyone but BRM does not have enough N for me to buy regularly.

 

As Phil says the following scenery practicals could apply to 2mm:

 

How to correct common modelling mistakes

Make a football pitch

Planting telegraph poles

Create a perfect British Oak Tree

Paint a convincing backscene

Improve a standard card kit

Model a realistic boat club scene

 

I've never see 7mm modellers, for example, saying there's nothing in a show/magazine/book/product announcement for them so why does this frequently happen with 2mm scale N gauge modellers? (Facebook is even worse for it than these pages though).



#22 grahame

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Posted 22 July 2017 - 10:42

- it's just easier to photograph them in 4mm.


Hmmmm, that's a very weak excuse not to build some other scale examples. I don't have any issues in photographing N/2mm models.

G.

#23 grahame

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Posted 22 July 2017 - 10:45

As Phil says the following scenery practicals could apply to 2mm:
 
.


That might well be in general terms, but often there are different specific nuances, techniques and tips that apply in other scales. And sometimes it's nice to see completed models in ones chosen scale rather than having to imagine what they could be like.

G

#24 Jongudmund

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Posted 22 July 2017 - 18:17

Page 73 and page 83 - Phil P has been flipped hasn't he?
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#25 Tony Wright

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Posted 23 July 2017 - 17:24

Thumbs up from me too for the coverage of Barmouth Junction.  It reminds me of how things were done when I was a kid, a L O N G time ago, but then every effort was made to fill the available space with stations, yards, sheds, towns and heaven knows what else [Edward Beal's West Midland, anyone?].  Geoff has done it it properly, with the main stage of Barmouth Junction and the subsidiary stages of Penmaenpool, Dolgelley and Abergwynant duly separated from it.  No-one can do everything at once and it will be interesting to see what he tackles next.

 

Elsewhere in the magazine I was very taken with Michael Russell's trees.  Some years ago I was shown another method at a show and just could not get it right.  The layout will need some trees one day and the method in BRM is well worth a try.  Tony Wright's Big Bertha surely deserves to be described as a masterclass.  Each stage is explained clearly and illustrated appropriately.  The important lesson which comes across is not to assume that a kit is 100% accurate or contains everything needed [been there, done it].  I wonder how long it took Tony to complete what he built?

 

I was quite taken with Phil [not Pete!] Waterfield's Corwenna.  Just as you think that china clay has been done to death as a theme, along comes another variant - Trerice but with space.  Nice one!  What impressed me most was something not mentioned in the text, namely the use of Peco couplings.  How wonderfully unobtrusive they are compared with those wretched tension lock things that pervade the hobby rather like Japanese knotweed.  Was the author too modest to mention them or was the relevant sentence pruned for reasons of space?

 

With one reservation, well done for the way St Merryn is featured.  This is one of my favourite layouts and Tony Wright's pictures have truly captured it at its best.  The idea of sepia tinted photographs is a clever one but don't overdo it in future.  Having taken the trouble to include a photograph of the team, surely it should have been complemented by naming those in it.  Credit where it is due, please.  From left to right: Eddie Bourne, Steve Carter, Brian Self, Chris McCarthy and Bob Bourne.

 

Oh yes, the DVD.  27 minutes of screen time is not as miserly as some have been and I found Phil's piece on hedges interesting [guess what, the layout needs some new hedges].  I was disappointed, given some of the gems that have been included in Extras in the past, to find merely another recommendation to try the digital issue.   #anticlimax.

 

Chris

Thanks for your kind comments, Chris,

 

Time for the Big Bertha build? Around 40 hours, spread over far too long a period. 

 

St. Merryn was a joy to photograph (with quite limited time, at the Southampton Show in January). Thanks to Eddie and the team for making my job so easy. It also works impeccably. 

 

I quite liked the way some of the shots had been 'distressed' in the magazine, suggesting fading prints. Because of mixed lighting, some of my pictures were in black & white, anyway.  

 

Edited because I missed mentioning the most important bit. 


Edited by Tony Wright, 23 July 2017 - 17:52 .









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