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Overseas railways worth modelling

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#51 Pacific231G

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Posted 02 September 2017 - 21:42

Yes - I actually teach science, the trouble with water is that it is a very effective solvent and it'll dissolve co2 and whatever it can find upon exposure to the air, but that's a lot less dissolved ions that rain or tap water, so distilled is certainly a far better electrical insulator (again, we say insulator but from a technical point of view there's no such thing, just poorer conductors) than using normal water (roughly about 1/1000 as conductive as typical tap water) particularly with a low current and voltage.

I've seen a layout that included a section of AFAIR about half a metre of flooded track and it did just use tapwater. Though there probably were some electrical losses through the water (which would effectively create a parallel circuit to that through the motor) it didn't seem to be causing a signficant loss of power, probably less than the mechanical drag created by the water. Clearly a longer water section would have greater losses but it would be easy enough to experiment with a length of track and a bowl of water. 


Edited by Pacific231G, 02 September 2017 - 22:07 .




#52 whart57

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Posted 03 September 2017 - 08:18

Absolutely, the Sierra Menera too - 4-8-0s, big NBL 0-6-6-0s and garratts. There's a load of Spanish metre gauge lines that have a lovely mix of British, German, French and Spanish built motive power but I've not seen much respresentation of them in model form, especially as its not that far away and some of these systems ran steam quite late on.

 

You won't see that unless someone has put the work in researching these lines. I'm building a layout based on Thailand and I would guess that 70% of the research is my own work. That's why it is set in the present day, I don't have a Tardis. You need loads of photographs, even more so if you don't have drawings, and not just the static posed shots of new locomotives. In southern and eastern Europe there were often restrictions on photographing railways as well. Just ten years ago transport police in Madrid made me erase a couple of pictures I'd taken of trains on the metro when they saw me take them. They've probably eased up now otherwise they would spend their days hassling people to erase selfies but restrictions in the past mean there is a greater shortage of pics than there might otherwise be.


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#53 EddieB

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Posted 03 September 2017 - 20:32

Catching up on this thread...

 

 

To kick this off, I suggest the narrow gauge steam tram lines of Gelderland (NL)

 

 

Where can I find information?

 

De Stoomlocomotieven der Nederlandse Tramwegen - S. Overbosch, provides descriptions and some drawings of the locomotives used

 

Very pleased to find a copy at one of the stalls at Old Oak Common yesterday!

 

Try this:

 

http://www.railpictu...t/photo/381524/

 

I might be wrong about them not being in the preserved fleet, looking at the picture more closely the two locos might be Japanese built C56s without tenders and a couple of those are theoretically steamable.

 

What a train eh? Double-headed with a couple of GE UM12C diesel electrics, a dead steam loco, 3 or 4 four wheel vans, 3 four wheel brake vans and another dead steam loco. Note the red rag tied to coupling lifter bar to indicate the tail of the train.

 

A lighter engineering train is:

 

http://www.railpictu...t/photo/381353/

 

Definitely C56s. I think they have tenders,they're just hard to see due to the tele-lens distortion.

Cheers,

Mark.

I'd say that they are C56s 715 (front) and 713 (inside), both operational at that time and based at Thonburi depot.  (713 retains its JNR numberplate on the smokebox door).

 

The Rio Tinto mining railway in Spain has always struck me as a particularly interesting railway that'd make a great subject for a layout.

There was a monograph written by Alan Sewell in 1991 which gives a very good account of this very British line.

 

Absolutely, the Sierra Menera too - 4-8-0s, big NBL 0-6-6-0s and garratts. There's a load of Spanish metre gauge lines that have a lovely mix of British, German, French and Spanish built motive power but I've not seen much respresentation of them in model form, especially as its not that far away and some of these systems ran steam quite late on.

As noted, less well covered - but there were illustrated articles in old editions of "European Railways".


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#54 whart57

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Posted 04 September 2017 - 07:47

I wonder how often those C56s get steamed. The pictures posted on the internet of steam runs in Thailand (generally on the King's birthday and the anniversary of the first line to be opened in Thailand) invariably show larger locomotives, a Pacific and a 4-8-2, coupled back to back as there are no turning facilities at Ayuttaya or the Bangkok depots.



#55 Neil

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Posted 12 September 2017 - 06:49

Narrow gauge in the Italian Alps anyone?


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#56 Craigw

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Posted 12 September 2017 - 11:07

I will put this up for something a little different from what has been mentioned. Port Waratah loco depot in NSW was one of two depots active at the very end of steam workings in New South Wales (Australia). This photo (from my collection) shows 5069 - a Beyer Peacock build of 1903 running tender first out of the yard on a "non air" working . The coal stage is in the background. Photo was taken in 1971-1972. The final working was hauled by 5069 on 22nd December 1972. Surely this is inspirational?

 

regards,

 

Craig W

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#57 whart57

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Posted 23 September 2017 - 15:45

Another suggestion.

 

The Belgian local railway network SNCV (NMVB in Flemish) is reasonably well known to Overseas railway enthusiasts through the Belgian coast line (Knokke - Oostende - De Panne) and the clunky 0-6-0T tram engines of the steam days. What is not so well known is that parts of the network (other than the coast line) survived into the 1960s and possibly 70s in backwaters of the Ardennes. One line is still preserved and the website (unfortunately only in French and Dutch) gives the flavour:

 

http://www.tta.be

 

What makes these lines interesting in their later days is that the motive power was diesel powered tramcars, with seats for passengers, without seats but a few hefty concrete blocks to increase traction for goods. Goods traffic, mainly logs from the Ardennes forestry industry, was what kept lines open long after the motor bus (also operated by the SNCV) had taken the passengers. These diesel tractors would be relatively easy to build using something like a Halling motor bogie (in HOm) and a Plastikard body.

 

With the Ardennes providing a hilly and forested terrain and short trains, a layout need not take much space


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#58 Neil

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Posted 25 September 2017 - 13:40

Excellent suggestion Wharf57. There are oodles of images of the Vicinal on the internet, this page is a good starting point but the really interesting older photos start around page 4. Here's just one of my favourite images; you'll see as you browse the photos that many/most lines were still electrified right up until the end.


Edited by Neil, 25 September 2017 - 13:44 .

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#59 whart57

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Posted 25 September 2017 - 14:45

Some of the more interesting pictures are of electric and diesel powered trams side by side. Some nice ones of diesel tractors hauling a four wheel trailer dating back to steam tram days and still in the old livery.

 

A picture of some disused tracks reminds me of an incident on a family holiday some fifty years ago. We had been camping in France and Luxembourg and were heading to meet up with family in Amsterdam when we stopped for a leg stretcher somewhere in Belgium. When we got out we saw the family Ford Cortina Mk1 was parked on some tram rails. My brother and I were puzzled that there was no sign of any overhead wiring, not even poles at the side of the tracks. Didn't know then that not all trams were electric.


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#60 Hobby

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Posted 27 September 2017 - 08:27

What are they?

 

760mm narrow gauge lines in the Czech Republic or Slovakia

 

 

Where can I find information?

 

http://jhmd.cz/introduction

http://www.chz.sk/en_index.htm

http://www.osoblazsko.com/en/

 

 

Why would I want to?

 

Lovely scenery... Think Welshpool without the hedges! Large variety of stock form all over Central Europe all in different colours, even the steamers can be found in green and blue!

 

 

Why wouldn't I want to?

 

Will involve scratchbuilding and kit buildings, there's not a lot of suitable RTR...

 

Has it been done before?

 

Errr, yes, I've done the Czech lines, though not Cierney Balog, in TTe and HOe...


Edited by Hobby, 27 September 2017 - 08:27 .


#61 Northroader

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Posted 28 September 2017 - 09:05

Mention of the Belgian Vicinal makes me suggest a look over the border in the Netherlands, where they did "stoomtrams" very well. I did a post in another thread a year back which is worth dusting off, as it shows a very neat model, done in a tableau format, with links to a Dutch artist who provided the inspiration.http://www.rmweb.co....-2#entry2398258
Here's a shot of a preservation museum, and I feel it would provide a good inspiration for a micro / cameo layout:IMG_1443.JPG
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#62 Dutch_Master

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Posted 28 September 2017 - 12:23

FYI: the image above is at Hoorn station, home of the SHM which has a line between Hoorn and the nearby town of Medemblik. The SHM depicts the rural light railways very much prevalent in NL up to the late 30's and early/mid 40's. Although classified as tramways, these where really (light) railways and had railway wagon transfers over their line (certainly from 1921 onwards owned by NS anyway, whatever their origin). The loco on the left is a visitor from fellow museum MBS, near the German border, while on the right is SHM loco 7742 "Bello". Not named after a dog, but the bell mandated to be rung while traversing tramways (more specifically, while approaching and crossing a level crossing or within station limits), already well over a century old. Loco 7742 had been a static object commemorating the very scenic Alkmaar to Bergen-aan-zee line, one of the last of these rural tramways to close and very much beloved by holiday makers until closure in the mid-1950's. Parts of the original alignment of that line is now a cycle path. (what else in this country :P )  The carriages on the far right are actually regauged NG cars originally from the 3'6" RTM tramway. IMO it's a pity these are not in the RTM museum, but at least they've survived. The overhead gantry is the NS main line (Amsterdam)-Zaandam-Hoorn-Enkhuizen, more particularly Hoorn station yard.

 

HTH!


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#63 whart57

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Posted 28 September 2017 - 14:30

A number of decent models have been made of these Dutch local railways, generally set in their heydays. However as with the Belgian SNCV lines, some lingered on as goods lines even into the 1980s. As I mentioned earlier on this thread, the Class 200 "Siks" and Class 600 "Hippels" (aka BR class 08) are available, as is the 2400 class Bo-Bo typically used on the mainline connection.



#64 St Enodoc

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Posted 24 October 2017 - 20:55

 

What are they?

 

760mm narrow gauge lines in the Czech Republic or Slovakia

 

 

Where can I find information?

 

http://jhmd.cz/introduction

http://www.chz.sk/en_index.htm

http://www.osoblazsko.com/en/

 

 

Why would I want to?

 

Lovely scenery... Think Welshpool without the hedges! Large variety of stock form all over Central Europe all in different colours, even the steamers can be found in green and blue!

 

 

Why wouldn't I want to?

 

Will involve scratchbuilding and kit buildings, there's not a lot of suitable RTR...

 

Has it been done before?

 

Errr, yes, I've done the Czech lines, though not Cierney Balog, in TTe and HOe...

 

The similar NG lines on the south side of Lake Balaton in Hungary would be good too.


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