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Simple home-made pointwork, for micro and small layouts

Points scratchbuilt DIY cheaply easily




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#51 JimRead

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Posted 17 March 2018 - 11:04

Hello Hayfield,

 

Please read on as that will become apparent as the thread proceeds

[edit] I just had a thought that Hayfield may be your home town if that is so I will be at the Sheffield show on the 6th October with Muckton the one in the video I made, I know its a fair amount of time away, you would be very welcome indeed to sit by my layout have a nice chat and have a go as well.

 

Hello David

 

Thanks for the post very nice of you to comment.

 

Cheers


Edited by JimRead, 17 March 2018 - 12:03 .




#52 brossard

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Posted 17 March 2018 - 13:20

Jim

 

Sorry for a bit of a constructive comment, but you have not included the SET in the switch 

 

I mentioned "set" in post 19 and added a picture.  The template doesn't need to show the set as long as the builder knows that it is needed.

 

John



#53 JimRead

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Posted 17 March 2018 - 15:45

Hello John,
 
Many thanks for your comment you are quite right, I think my videos in these two posts indicate what is to come.
 
 
 
I was at a show in Selby and a gentleman came and sat down and said he had been the driver of an 0-4-0 and that everytime he drove over the points in the yard he worked in the loco lurched and one of the points had blades that began as a curve, then a sharp angle followed by another curve. He used to offer a new mate a cup of tea and drive over it quickly and said that once the tea went flying out of the cab and the very nearly the mate as well. I love listening to some of the visitors they have such great tales to recount. It's one of the joys of having a micro layout.
 
Cheers


#54 brossard

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Posted 17 March 2018 - 15:57

Oh dear, am I guilty of jumping to the punchline?

 

John


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#55 JimRead

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Posted 17 March 2018 - 16:12

Hello John,

 

Thanks for that made me smile, of course you haven't and there will never be a punchline from me at all just a slowly accumulating list of steps that will make it very easy for someone to make a simple point for themselves. And some of the people who will do it themselves and find how easy it is and not necessarily from my PDF's will decide to create something using Templot and will seek advice from the very helpful members of this Handbuilt Track & Templot section of the fora.

 

Cheers



#56 hayfield

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Posted 17 March 2018 - 17:48

 

Hello John,
 
Many thanks for your comment you are quite right, I think my videos in these two posts indicate what is to come.
 
 
 
I was at a show in Selby and a gentleman came and sat down and said he had been the driver of an 0-4-0 and that everytime he drove over the points in the yard he worked in the loco lurched and one of the points had blades that began as a curve, then a sharp angle followed by another curve. He used to offer a new mate a cup of tea and drive over it quickly and said that once the tea went flying out of the cab and the very nearly the mate as well. I love listening to some of the visitors they have such great tales to recount. It's one of the joys of having a micro layout.
 
Cheers

 

 

 

Just from experience the novice builder has an ability to accept a certain amount of information, the most common fault being failing to remember to create a set. I find and use the plan as both a guide and a memory jogger. Before I even lay a rail I mark up certain features on every plan just as memory joggers, but that's because I have a memory like a sieve. 

 

Still I will await eagerly the progression of this thread progresses and will apologize now in case I pinch a few of your ideas


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#57 JimRead

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Posted 17 March 2018 - 21:16

Hello Hayfield,
 
Many thanks for your message nice of you to reply.
 
There is absolutely no need to apologise for using any of my ideas, I give them away freely, I see it as my duty to do so. I would be delighted to send you my PDF's in exchange for a nice message with your email address.
 
Here's a nice pic for you
 
10wpusp.jpg
A threeway and two single points under construction.
The sleepers are made from artists mountboard
And the rail glued to them with super glue
The sleepers were coated with Shellac before being painted
I used the layout for two years and gave it to Ilkeston MRC when I started making my first micro (though you may have already read that back in this thread and see the pic with the nice back scene I was given apologies if you have)
 
Cheers

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#58 brossard

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Posted 18 March 2018 - 00:51

Hi Jim.  Your use of card for sleepers is interesting.  I would have said that it wouldn't last due its susceptibility to moisture.  I guess the shellac helps with sealing.  The layouts exteneded life gives the lie to my thinking.

 

John



#59 JimRead

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Posted 18 March 2018 - 08:53

Hello John,

 

Thanks for the message good of you, Shellac will seal the card and anything else it makes a very good metal primer as well. I went into a Drysalters in Coventry one day in the late 70's and asked if they sold it, what colour do you want the guy said I told him it was for making card wagons from drawings. I chose the orange one from the list, how much do you want he said so I asked the price, it wasn't very much so I asked for a pound, his eyebrows went up but off he trotted and came back with a huge bag of the stuff. I don't think I've used 1/2 of it yet.

 

I dissolve the flakes in Meths, later when talking to a guy who worked at Metro Cammell at a show, he told me that they'd made some coaches for Indonesian Railways, the spec for the floor was timber planks laid edge on when they had been assembled and machined IR sent a couple of guys over to treat the floor. They used Shellac 40 coats of it and explained that it was the only stuff that would keep out moisture and wood boring insects. Why I asked him, well it's the only varnish where the next coat dissolves into the first one, which penetrates whatever you put it on.

 

Interesting stuff makes card feel almost like wood.

 

Cheers


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#60 JimRead

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Posted 18 March 2018 - 12:19

Hello all,
 
This is the third post in the series, and is linked from the second one
 
Check the rail height from your plain track to the rail height on a copper clad strip, you may need some thin card to pack up the copper clad. I use Code 100 Flat Bottom rail but everything herein is suitable for the sort of figure of 8 Bullhead.
 
Using the dawing you made, copy it and stick it to your baseboard, I use cheapo 'Pritt Stick' stuff from Ebay which is better than PS and contains PVA glue.
 
What you have then should look something like this.
 
2wn8vat.jpg
 
And then this
 
20kqgc3.jpg
I have left out the strips near the frog, the others are glued to the drawing with white PVA glue
And the ones at the left where the tie bar will go are also not glued in place.
 
At this stage a decision has to made about the operation of the point, wire in the tube, surface switch or even some solenoid or motor operated thingy under the board. The under board caper will need a hole in the baseboard equidistant from the upper and lower rails, and eventually a corresponding tiny hole in the tie bar. In the past I have made these holes about 3mm wide and 8mm long I'll come to the tie bar drilling a bit later.
 
Onto the drawing and the next stage.
 
35koeig.jpg
Measure A to B on your baseboard and add to that just short of two 1/2 lengths of the distance between the end of the point and the start of the plain track, this will leave a small insulation gap. Use a pencil to mark the length.
 
I use some wire cutters to cut through the rail and then file it to the measured length. Which brings me onto filing an indent into the straight rail at point X...... I make this point at 1/2 way across a CC strip.
 
Onto filing, I was taught how to file by Albert at my father's company when I was about 14 (press work was so boring I never worked for him), Albert was a press tool maker and he drummed into me that the tool does the work and not the person using it. He then showed me how to file flat, thumbs on the handle and on the end of the file and use the least amount of pressure, too much pressure and all that happens is the file goes blunt very quickly. Concentrating on keeping the file flat I realised that I was removing far more metal than I had been using a lot of pressure and a see saw motion. I use a fine file it's all that is needed.
 
Here is the rail in my old vice ready to have the indent filed.
 
qnjpn9.jpg
The file has one side plain and the other serrated, the plain side is against my thumb and my thumb is next to the mark I made at point X...... With the file at an angle I make a small indent into the rail.
 
This how I start the filing in the proper manner
 
2nl5nxl.jpg
 
And this is how the indent will look
 
8voupv.jpg
I do make my tapers longer than this at about the length of 5 copper clad strip this bit of rail was all I had left.
 
More soon

Edited by JimRead, 19 March 2018 - 09:27 .

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#61 JimRead

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Posted 21 March 2018 - 17:58

Hello all,
 
To begin with, a couple of other ways a point can be made 'off baseboard'
 
nnr1o4.jpg
The method can be seen quite clearly in the photo and can be used two ways.
Glue the drawing in place on the card, or wood if you are handy with a saw.
Cover that with something transparent, put the CC strips on top and hold them down with masking tape.
 
The second is to print or copy the drawing onto thin card and stick the strips down with PVA. 
 
If you haven't got a printer there are still lots of places to get photo copies, it's what I used before I got my first PC. I do understand that lots of you reading this will be using phones and tablets.
 
Soldering the top straight rail into place.
 
Firstly how to solder.
 
vgklqg.jpg
This is the same length of rail used in the filing post.
I've held the rail down with blue tack.
The blue stuff in the white pot is Plumbers Flux which makes the solder run better.
The solder below it is called 60/40, 60% Tin 40% Lead, it is possible to obtain Lead free solder and I have used it, it doesn't run very well at all, better though with the Flux.
 
n18pj4.jpg
I use the red screwdriver to put a small amount of Flux on the joint.
I hold the soldering iron on the joint but do not press down on it.
 
zjdkie.jpg
I swivel the iron slightly and introduce the solder under the iron tip, let a small amount melt under the iron tip.
The solder will flow under the rail
Leaving the iron in contact with the joint I push the rail down with the blue screwdriver to make sure it is in good contact with the copper strip.
Remove the iron, leave the screwdriver in place while the joint hardens.
 
rbe9zb.jpg
A close up of the joint you can see that there is not much solder present.
 
Now onto making the point itself, you will need a roller gauge for the gauge of track you are going to make.
 
2zeffwj.jpg
 
Hold the straight rail A/B down with some blue tack.
Then solder at point 1, make sure its straight afterwards.
Solder at point 2 and then point 3
Then solder the two strips to the left of 2
 
The reason for this is that the blades will also be soldered to these three strips and the strips could move unless they are soldered to A/B. At this stage do not do any more soldering to the straight rail
 
34i5yms.jpg
Once the straight rail is in place, rail C/D should be soldered in place but only at D.
File an angle to the end of C/D and make a flat so that the other short rail will butt up to it
and use the Roller Gauge to position and solder it.
(I found this pic later on today, I think it explains it far better than my words)
 
Looking through my pic I found this a bit clearer I think.
15xti6s.jpg
 
More soon
[edit] speeling

Edited by JimRead, 21 March 2018 - 23:30 .

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#62 JimRead

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Posted 30 March 2018 - 11:12

Hello all,
 
Onto the next stage
 
2reqob7.jpg
Cut and file A/B this little section is straight, line it up by eye with the drawing and solder it at point B only.
Cut rail C/D in the same manner as the straight rail and file an indent into it as at x........
Using the roller gauge solder at point 1, using the drawing as a guide solder at point 2 and using the roller gauge from A/B solder at point 3. You will probably have to do some adjustments hence the few solder points.
 
More soon

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#63 JimRead

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Posted 20 April 2018 - 15:05

Hello all,

 

I finished off the rest of it in MS Publisher and converted it to a PDF.

 

To summarise the thread, if you have never filed anything, never soldered anything then this PDF is for you.

Please send me a nice message with your email address and I will gladly send it to you.

 

You may wonder why I do this;

 

I started modelling in the late 70's and failed to make anything in 2mm N Gauge, 3mm TT gauge and 4mm OO Gauge. Eileen bought me an O Gauge wagon kit for my birthday, I assembled it in an evening. I went back to the model shop, Roy Millership's Modellers Mecca in Wall Heath, explaining that I'd made someone else's model. Roy is unique he didn't say sorry nothing I can do for you, he said I've got just the book for you it was by E. Rankine Gray and called "Cardboard rolling stock and how to build it" it was 50p he then said there are some 7mm scale 0 gauge drawings in those magazines, pointing to a pile of them and they are 50p as well.
 
The book was and still is a revelation to anyone wanting to make wagons for pennies, if you cannot find a copy I have authored a PDF about wagon making from card. In same spirit shown to me by Roy I endeavour to pass on my knowledge to others, I feel it my duty to do so.
 
Cheers

Edited by JimRead, 20 April 2018 - 18:31 .

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