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Duddon Bridge - a Cumbrian Light Railway in 7mm scale

Light RailwayCumbria 7mm scale Furness




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#51 tim@dy

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Posted 08 June 2018 - 21:02

What are you using for the rail spikes?

The're made by Micro Engineering and are available from EDM Models.

 

Tim





#52 81A Oldoak

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Posted 09 June 2018 - 08:24

The're made by Micro Engineering and are available from EDM Models.

 

Tim

Thank you Tim. We trade with EDM's proprietor Paul Martin and know him well. I am investigating spiked track with Code 100 FB rail for a potential light railway layout to sit under one of our forthcoming Manning Wardles. Philip Healy- Pearce at Intentio has said he can laser-cut sleepers with ready cut holes for spikes. 

 

Regards,

 

Chris 


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#53 wagonman

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Posted 12 June 2018 - 17:40

Thank you Tim. We trade with EDM's proprietor Paul Martin and know him well. I am investigating spiked track with Code 100 FB rail for a potential light railway layout to sit under one of our forthcoming Manning Wardles. Philip Healy- Pearce at Intentio has said he can laser-cut sleepers with ready cut holes for spikes. 

 

Regards,

 

Chris 

 

 

Karlgarin Models over in Chelmsford, Essex, does specially drawn code 82 and code 100 FB rail for use in 7mm scale. It has a much better section than the usual Peco stuff. (I've got some for my Manning Wardles...).

 

http://www.karlgarin.com/whatsnew.htm

 

 

Richard



#54 tim@dy

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Posted 13 June 2018 - 21:23

We thought about using Karlgarin code 100 rail but we had plenty of redundant Peco code 100 in stock so we went down the Peco route.

 

Tim



#55 hartleymartin

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Posted 16 June 2018 - 16:32

If you look up a layout called “Stringybark Creek” you’ll see all the track made for it. The whole lot was hand-laid with 4 spikes in every sleeper using balsa for the base to produce “hand-laid flexitrack.” I made about 80 yards of the stuff! We used Micro-Engineering code 100 rail and “micro”-sized spikes. After all that work, we realised that painted RTR flex track looked just as good so we used that on Arakoola.
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#56 NeilHB

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Posted 20 June 2018 - 13:26

I called in to see Tim on Monday on my day off to view the progress made on Duddon Bridge. Tim has been busy fitting the fiddleyard turntables with buffers to prevent any unnecessary casualties...

 

Photo 18-06-2018, 14 00 02.jpg

 

Nice and simple, but quite effective. 

 

We had a 'golden spike' moment on Monday at Duddon Bridge - the last rail spike went in on the lightweight timber tramway - hurrah! 

 

Photo 18-06-2018, 13 59 22.jpg

 

The track alongside this section has a wonderful weave to it, definitely not straight in the slightest. It looks just like what it's supposed to be, a very lightweight section of industrial trackwork...

 

Photo 18-06-2018, 14 00 55.jpg

 

Next up we started to work out the alignment for the narrow gauge trackwork at the rear of the layout, serving the mill boiler house etc. We'd originally looked at 0-16.5 and 0-14 for this section, before settling on 09, as we felt that the first two would be too overpowering at the rear, as there really isn't very much room at all. 

 

Although it has a very simple trackplan, with just two points, this section actually took some quite serious thunking to try and decide how to place the track, so as not to interfere with the already planned features such as the mill boiler house and the mill loco shed: 

 

Photo 18-06-2018, 14 00 16.jpg

 

The left hand line will run through to the far fiddle yard, abutted right up the SG trackwork to cope with the minimal clearances in this section. Both of these sections of trackwork will be inset into cobbles. The point in the foreground will lead back into the mill boiler house, and allow coal to be brought through the complex from the coal stocks at the far end of the site, directly to the boiler house. 

 

Photo 18-06-2018, 15 10 26.jpg

 

Next the line will run between the mill loco shed, and the millwrights, with a number of wagon turntables leading off into the millwrights complex. 

 

Photo 18-06-2018, 15 10 21.jpg

 

Finally, there is another set of points serving a short siding, before the line continues over the main road, and runs into the rag/waste paper shed along with the standard gauge siding. Again, this whole section of track will be inset, so it looks like Tim and I are in for soldering a lot more track! 

 

We've acquired a lovely little loco to operate the 0-9 - a Ruston Proctor ( https://www.lincstot...oco/395.article ) paraffin loco, courtesy of N-Drive Productions. I've got a couple of Peco N-gauge wagon chassis' to build some bodies on for transporting the rag bales to and from the rag/waste shed. 

 

Stay tuned for more updates. 

 


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#57 NeilHB

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Posted 21 June 2018 - 14:00

Quick doodle at lunchtime at work today working out some possible designs for 09 and SG rag waste wagons: 

 

Photo 21-06-2018, 14 45 28.jpg

 

The 09 versions will be built around a Peco N gauge 15ft w/b chassis, mainly as I have a trio of them to hand. 

 

SG version will be a complete scratchbuild job from plastic strip and sheet. Need to sort out some axleboxes as well for what will be a (very!) short wheelbase with no brakes.

 

I think we will need a few of the SG versions, as they are also anticipated to act as barrier wagons between the paper mill loco and the slurry tippers - not a nice job at all! 


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#58 wagonman

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Posted 22 June 2018 - 13:59

I've recently had to research the operation of a paper mill (Dowdings of Slaughterford). This was located in a former fulling mill powered by water. The raw material for the paper mill was rags collected from some of the less salubrious parts of Bristol and delivered in large bales. The stamps used to crush the fibres, and the Fourdriner-type paper making machine, were powered by water, but the mill needed coal – and Dowding had five PO wagons for the purpose – to fire the boilers that boiled the cloth. The 'slurry', or dirty wash-water would have been disposed of in the By Brook which powered the mill – and several others – before it joined the Avon. Not great fishing waters! The mill produced mostly paper for bags for the clothing industry, and finally closed in 1993.

 

In my alternative universe it too will be rail-served though in reality the nearest station was either Box or Corsham on the GWR main line so all the materials had to be delivered by horse and cart.

 

Good luck with your project.


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#59 wagonman

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Posted 22 June 2018 - 23:56

A thread has just started on the S4 Soc forum about the Ulpha Light Railway – apparently it still exists! https://www.scalefou...&p=61738#p61738


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#60 NeilHB

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Posted 25 June 2018 - 07:44

Thanks wagonman. Ours is based somewhat on Croppers paper mills over at Burneside, which was coal powered before conversion to oil in the 1960s.

Glad to see that the Ulpha Light Railway is still in existence - it really is a very nice layout.
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#61 hartleymartin

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Posted 25 June 2018 - 14:44

Try building the standard gauge wagons from scale timber. I tried this a few years ago and found that scale basswood is a wonderful material - much easier to work than plastic or brass! I used zap-a-gap medium CA glue to hold mine together and a few years later they are still holding up despite the extremes of temperature and humidity we have here in Sydney, Australia. (Temperatures from 1 to 46 degrees and humidity anything from under 20% to over 90%)
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#62 NeilHB

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Posted 25 June 2018 - 16:53

Try building the standard gauge wagons from scale timber. I tried this a few years ago and found that scale basswood is a wonderful material - much easier to work than plastic or brass! I used zap-a-gap medium CA glue to hold mine together and a few years later they are still holding up despite the extremes of temperature and humidity we have here in Sydney, Australia. (Temperatures from 1 to 46 degrees and humidity anything from under 20% to over 90%)


Thanks Martin.

Change of plan though as realised I don’t need to build the SG internal user rag wagons - that’s what the 09 is for! The rag waste will arrive in SG opens and vans, be shunted into the rag/waste shed and unloaded, and any that is required in the mill is transhipped to the 09 and taken off into the depths of the mill complex. Simples.

I shall just need to build one internal user dumb buffered flat to act as the barrier wagon between the slurry tippers and the mill loco.
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