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Curved Scissors in P4





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#1 jf2682

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Posted 07 April 2018 - 18:32

The station throat for my new terminus required a curved scissors crossover, and as I am no expert in CAD I laid in the design by hand using long lengths of code 83 rail, suitably eased into place to join the station platforms (3 & 4 in this case) with the Southbound line to London and the Northbound line to Glasgow.  The extreme difficulty was in marking the plan onto paper so I could then start to lay in sleeper and individual rail positions, with the most difficult part being the crossing noses.  The crossings vary from #7 to # 10, and you may just about be able to see that the diamond is switched (no check rails at the obtuse crossing, just blades).  The result is the assembled junction.  Next comes installation, motorizing, and wiring, followed by painting.

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Edited by jf2682, 07 April 2018 - 18:48 .

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#2 roythebus

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  • LocationNear the 15" gauge and the 5"gauge, far from standard gauge, but 25 miles from Calais.

Posted 07 April 2018 - 21:32

Why use CAD when you can use Templot for free? It does most of the work for you. Well done though for doing it yourself.


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#3 jf2682

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Posted 09 April 2018 - 11:33

IMG_1400.JPG IMG_1401.JPG IMG_1402.JPG IMG_1403.JPG Here are some more views of the assembly located temporarily in position.  The switched single slip in the foreground dates from an earlier P4 layout from 1986, and it spent 12 years under the verandah of my cottage exposes to the serious temperature and humidity excursions of the Ottawa climate, undamaged.


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