Jump to content




Photo

Point Motors for C&L Turnout Kits

C&L turnout cobalt




  • Please log in to reply
14 replies to this topic

#1 turtlebah

turtlebah

    Member


  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 42 posts

Posted 31 May 2018 - 12:14

Hi RM Web,

 

I'm currently upgrading my layout track to C&L finescale turnout kits. I've had no trouble building the kits, which look great, but what's the best way of configuring my cobalt slow action point motors.

 

I've heard about soldering an additional copper sleeper to the switchblades as 1 option.

 

It seems that attaching the point motor pin to the cosmetic tie bar isn't really going to work long term.

 

What's everyone else's preferred method?

 

Cheers,

Nick


Edited by turtlebah, 31 May 2018 - 12:15 .




#2 Jol Wilkinson

Jol Wilkinson

    Member


  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 3,962 posts
  • LocationWoodbridge, Suffolk (too far from the Premier Line)

Posted 31 May 2018 - 12:27

You only need a hole in the pcb tie bar for the steel wire to pass through.

 

I've done something similar using the Masokits etched tie bars (unfortunately they are available 18.83mm gauge only) with a added wire loop.



#3 Siberian Snooper

Siberian Snooper

    Member


  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 4,214 posts
  • LocationSunny Plymouth!

Posted 31 May 2018 - 12:32

I have always used the method described in the Model Railway illustrated a short lived magazine edited by Ian Rice.

This consists of a box section tiebar under the baseboard which slides in the next size up box section joined together by an angle section with holes in to secure it to the baseboard with a couple of screws. The tie bar has two lengths of brass tube fitted into it, the centre lines of which are just under the gap between the switch blades, two lengths of brass wire a sliding fit in the tube, bent into L shape, one leg is slide into the tube and the other is soldered to the switch blades. I leave one side of the box section long with a hole to take the drive, the last ones I did used wire in the tube, but there's no reason other methods can't be used to operate it.

If I get a chance later I might be able too find a picture or two.
  • Informative/Useful x 1

#4 hayfield

hayfield

    Member


  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 9,670 posts

Posted 31 May 2018 - 12:45

There are two methods I have used

 

1  Cut a slot in the underlay where the tie bar goes, now cut four piece of PCB double sided tiebar about 5 mm wide, solder two together then solder both on the tiebar under the switch rails (making a U shape). simply solder the switch rails on to each pillar so that the tiebar is submerged under the sleepers. A piece of card is cut to shape and ballast glued to it hiding the tiebar

 

2  Replace the 3rd timber with a copperclad one which has had an isolation gap cut in the middle (and filled ), cut the slide plates off 2 brass slide chairs, solder the slide plates to the copperclad timber, then solder the switch blades to the slide plates. Solder the outer chair halves to the stock rails (not the timber) You now have an invisible tiebar.  

 

Both methods are far easier to do than explain

 

Masokits do make excellent tiebars which can be made functional 



#5 Siberian Snooper

Siberian Snooper

    Member


  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 4,214 posts
  • LocationSunny Plymouth!

Posted 31 May 2018 - 16:51

Sorry, I can't find the photos.

#6 Stephen Freeman

Stephen Freeman

    Member


  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 648 posts
  • LocationCheshire

Posted 03 June 2018 - 17:44

Hi,

 

Depends on the scale to some degree. If I remember correctly Ambis stretcher bars were included at one time and perhaps still are, I don't know. If on the other it's the C&L wire bars with neoprene tube, then it becomes slightly more difficult.

 

They are probably both best operated by means of using a prototypical angle crank which makes it more complicated as the motors movement has to be converted into a rotational one. The Ambis type can however be worked by attachment of a suitable piece of tube ( make it a loose fit on the wire) to the bar, as previously outlined.

 

I can go into more detail on the angle crank method if you are interested.



#7 roythebus

roythebus

    Member


  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 2,856 posts
  • LocationNear the 15" gauge and the 5"gauge, far from standard gauge, but 25 miles from Calais.

Posted 05 June 2018 - 07:45

The Folkestone club's layouts usually use model aircraft servos. they are about £2.50 from certain places, much cheaper than any other point motors I know of, very light and small.



#8 Jol Wilkinson

Jol Wilkinson

    Member


  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 3,962 posts
  • LocationWoodbridge, Suffolk (too far from the Premier Line)

Posted 05 June 2018 - 07:52

The Folkestone club's layouts usually use model aircraft servos. they are about £2.50 from certain places, much cheaper than any other point motors I know of, very light and small.

 

Plus the cost of servo controllers, servo mounts, changeover switches for the "frogs", etc. Weight and size isn't too critical, especially for fixed layouts.



#9 roythebus

roythebus

    Member


  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 2,856 posts
  • LocationNear the 15" gauge and the 5"gauge, far from standard gauge, but 25 miles from Calais.

Posted 05 June 2018 - 23:35

Plus the cost of servo controllers, servo mounts, changeover switches for the "frogs", etc. Weight and size isn't too critical, especially for fixed layouts.

 

I've been told the controller for up to 4 motors is about £8, and yes, micro switches can be added as required, still cheaper than tortoise/cobalt motors so i'm told. i haven't used them yet as I tend to shy way from anything digital or transistorised.



#10 Stephen Freeman

Stephen Freeman

    Member


  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 648 posts
  • LocationCheshire

Posted 06 June 2018 - 06:54

I've been told the controller for up to 4 motors is about £8, and yes, micro switches can be added as required, still cheaper than tortoise/cobalt motors so i'm told. i haven't used them yet as I tend to shy way from anything digital or transistorised.

Well, yes, you do have to put them together (very simple) and be a member of MERG at that price. Servo mounts aren't always necessary and again, you can either 3D print them or if a member of MERG, buy them fo not a lot. In any event, the cost per turnout would work out at about £8.00  maximum.

 

A lot of the problems associated with servo operation have now been overcome with the latest incarnation of the MERG units (if you count Fraser Smith's, which isn' available as a kit, yet and leave out the CBUS and signal variants), there are basically 2 types, a 4 servo one and a single servo unit..



#11 Junctionmad

Junctionmad

    Member


  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 1,577 posts

Posted 13 June 2018 - 15:13

[quote]I tend to shy way from anything digital or transistorised.[/quote)

You must find living in the 21 century a hellish experience , so

#12 NCB

NCB

    Member


  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 577 posts

Posted 13 June 2018 - 20:57

I use a gapped copper clad sleeper as a tie-bar. Drill holes just inside of where the point blades would go. Slightly countersink the underside of the holes. Insert a brass pin from underneath and bend the protuding bit horizontal. Solder horizontal bits to blades. You also need a hole in the middle to take the operating wire from underneath.

 

The advantage of this method is that the blades aren't soldered directly to the sleeper, and the angle between blade and sleeper can vary as required because the pin can pivot.


Edited by NCB, 13 June 2018 - 20:58 .


#13 AndyID

AndyID

    Member


  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 1,642 posts
  • LocationPacific Northwet

Posted 16 June 2018 - 03:54

You must find living in the 21 century a hellish experience , so

 

Was that really necessary?


  • Agree x 1

#14 roythebus

roythebus

    Member


  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 2,856 posts
  • LocationNear the 15" gauge and the 5"gauge, far from standard gauge, but 25 miles from Calais.

Posted 20 June 2018 - 22:40

I use a gapped copper clad sleeper as a tie-bar. Drill holes just inside of where the point blades would go. Slightly countersink the underside of the holes. Insert a brass pin from underneath and bend the protuding bit horizontal. Solder horizontal bits to blades. You also need a hole in the middle to take the operating wire from underneath.

 

The advantage of this method is that the blades aren't soldered directly to the sleeper, and the angle between blade and sleeper can vary as required because the pin can pivot.

 

That's what I use for tiebars. I used Peco fine track pins but being steel they come unsoldered after about 6 years.



#15 roythebus

roythebus

    Member


  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 2,856 posts
  • LocationNear the 15" gauge and the 5"gauge, far from standard gauge, but 25 miles from Calais.

Posted 20 June 2018 - 22:43

[quote]I tend to shy way from anything digital or transistorised.[/quote)

You must find living in the 21 century a hellish experience , so

No, I ignore technology wherever I can. If I cant fix it with a hammer or spanner, I ain't interested, and that includes model railway stuff. :) Relays yes, diodes, yes but digital, no. Far too complicated. there's nothing digital can do quicker than a switch can do by the time the human has programmed it. turn a switch, 1 second. Remember what number to tap into control pad, 5 seconds, having first spect 3 minutes trying to find  said pad. :)


  • Like x 2
  • Friendly/Supportive x 1












Also tagged with one or more of these keywords: C&L, turnout, cobalt