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Collectors Corner Hamblings





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#1 32a

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Posted 09 May 2010 - 17:17

Tme to resurect the old thread with three of the standard Southern range from 1937;


RM web sales 2 013.jpg RM web sales 2 016.jpg RM web sales 2 017.jpg RM web sales 2 018.jpg RM web sales 2 019.jpg RM web sales 2 020.jpg

Edited by 32a, 11 December 2012 - 20:45 .

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#2 32a

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Posted 09 May 2010 - 17:22

And from 1947;

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#3 Ceptic

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Posted 11 May 2010 - 10:26

Hi All.
Wonderful memories 32a, thanks for those pics.

Having missed your previous thead (on the old forum ?), just the word 'Hamblings', caught my eye.
Out of interest, what scale are the locos built to ?. They look to be 7mm./ft., but I always thought Hamblings range was in 4mm./ft. only. I stand to be corrected though.

Just to add to the nostalgia, here's a few scans from a 50's Hamblings' catalogue, showing their range of R-T-R, 4mm./ft. coaches. These were the dee's bees in their day, second only to the Exley models. Both of which, were out of reach, pricewise.
Also shown available at the time, are the Hambling-Merco range of litho papers. I've still got a few of these, somewhere.

I came across a couple of Hamblings' Bulleid 59ft. coaches (S1/2) at a recent collectors mart, and although being in a reasonable condition, in contrast with present day standards, they did come across as being fairly crude.

Regards.

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#4 bertiedog

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Posted 11 May 2010 - 10:56

All the items shown are 4mm and in the main post war wheels etc., the pre war were S-R brass or Bonds wheels, there were few manufacturers. By 1950 outside third had all but gone, and plastic centred wheels were designed by S-R for Hamblings, nickel at first, then plated, then brass, all fully insulated for 2 rail.

The examples shown are not fully detailed, Hamblings had no consistant output after the war, they were forced by compulsory purchase to close the Ringwood factory by the post war 1946 Government, and relied on pre-war parts and limited manufacture at S-R, plus coach production in London. Locos were made to order and to keep the price low they were very basic after the war.

For instance the WD Loco has no special wheels, but models were made with proper faces, hand made. Also the cylinders are cut away on several, and this was not usually done unless the customer requested it.

The Merco papers are still available from a current source, (I have no record, they go to shows), some originals, some reprints.

Stephen.
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#5 hayfield

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Posted 11 May 2010 - 11:14

I have a small growing collection of Eames / Jamieson locos and wooden coaches (CCW, Ratio Kings X etc) thought these pictures may be ou use

Picture 717.jpg

These are 2 wooden GWR Centanary coaches, the underframes need restoring, wooden bodies except for whitemetal ends and Keyser bogies. No idea of make, the cast ends have come off in the past and have been badly stuck back.

Picture 718.jpg

The King Arthur is a recent purchace, it needs the boiler bands replacing and repainting. The tender needs a bit more work as the bogies are adapted Triang coach or wagon ones, the bufferbeam is attached to the rear one and front steps to the front one, also they need replacing in the correct places. I am also thinging about replacing the pistons and valve gear if a more modern type will fit

The E2 has been repainted and is waiting for transfers. Triang chassis and Romford wheels

Picture 703.jpg

The bogies will be replaced as they are too wide and if resited will foul the steps if they are attached to the body.

I will not try and super detail the models (though the King Arthur is not too bad) and try and keep them true to era
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#6 32a

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Posted 11 May 2010 - 12:35

They are 4mm, just blown up a bit by my digital camera that am still trying to master!

Hopefully like yourself, others will be tempted to post vintage model photographs as there is a dearth of information since the demise of the Model Railway Collector magazine at the turn of the century. (That sound old!)

#7 32a

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Posted 11 May 2010 - 16:56

alice 067.jpg alice 068.jpg RM web sales 2 009.jpg


For variety a post war Schools, note the different slide bar arrangement and the much later wheels.

Edited by 32a, 18 March 2012 - 13:26 .


#8 DavidBelcher

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Posted 12 May 2010 - 11:19

RM web sales 2 009.jpg


For variety a post war Schools, note the different slide bar arrangement and the much later wheels.


Also looks to be one of the examples with the Lemaitre blastpipe, just for extra variety.

David

#9 32a

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Posted 15 May 2010 - 11:07

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Some more Hamblings for interest, the LMS Fairburn tank, a King (with Hawkesworth tender!), a special order Brittania and a County.

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#10 32a

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Posted 15 May 2010 - 19:09

RM web 009.jpg

And to finish, a super detailed ex-GWR Prarie which dates from the 50's and features split chassis pick up, full wheel springing, skew armature motor and incredible detailing. Have we progressed?RM web 010.jpg

#11 bertiedog

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Posted 15 May 2010 - 19:37

Frankly the last GWR Prairie is more the standard of finish I saw at Hamblings, lots of older ones were re-built to better finish in the 1960's. Split frame would only be done to order as the wheels were all insulated. It is often difficult to say whether the model was built by Hamblings or from parts made by them. The LMS 264 was typical, the stampings were 1938 vintage, still being used in the 1950's

#12 32a

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Posted 22 May 2010 - 07:36

Another example of the super-detailed Hamblings locomotives, a 4F.

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#13 32a

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Posted 28 May 2010 - 14:05

rm web 085.jpg rm web 086.jpg

Another version of the Hamblings WD austerity. No idea who the lettering was for.

#14 random

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Posted 02 June 2010 - 17:59

A Bonds Hamblings LMS Beyer-Garratt. I believe this model was commissioned jointly from Bonds and Hamblings in 1952 and that they each produced part of it. One may have produced the body and the other the working parts, but I am not sure. It is made from sheet material - possibly nickel silver. I think I am the third owner of it. It has a single motor. I have never run it but intend to do so.


Bonds Hamblings Garratt 1 1.jpg
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#15 random

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Posted 03 June 2010 - 12:42

Hamblings litho sided Cadburys wagon. Many Hamblings wagons like this one seem to be rather on the wide side. I believe the Cadbury's lithos were produced pre-war and not redone afterwards. Lanal couplings - a forerunner of the modern tension lock.

Cadbury wagon 1 1.jpg

#16 32a

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Posted 28 November 2010 - 17:49

alice 154.jpg

95% certain that this is Hamblings, very unusual for it's time.

#17 shortliner

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Posted 28 November 2010 - 18:20

Hamblings litho sided Cadburys wagon. Many Hamblings wagons like this one seem to be rather on the wide side. I believe the Cadbury's lithos were produced pre-war and not redone afterwards. Lanal couplings - a forerunner of the modern tension lock.

Cadbury wagon 1 1.jpg


Re the couplings - were they to do with Eric Lanal (aka Allan Rice) who used to write a column in Model Railroader many years ago?

#18 roythebus

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Posted 09 December 2010 - 08:57

When Hamblings were clearing out in the early 1970s I acquired a Met Railway 4-4-4T and a GWR 0-4-2T. foolishly I gave them to someone who was going to get them running for me and I've never seen the locos since.

ISTR both were very well detailed for their time, in fact the Met loco needed 3' radius curves as the leading bogie fouled the cylinders. Some interesting stuff here.

#19 Sheffield

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Posted 19 December 2010 - 17:15

I have the body of what I think is a Hamblings LMS brake third, without bogies, if any one wants it for the price of the postage (about £10) think from here).

#20 handyman

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Posted 22 December 2010 - 22:30

What a super collection of proper locos! :man_in_love_mini: Somehow, modern, plastic super detail locos have missed the point, in my opinion.

Are these sitting on fibre based rails? I have quite a lot of this being unused, as I run all my locos on Dublo or Peco track.

Handyman

#21 32a

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Posted 23 December 2010 - 08:37

What a super collection of proper locos! :man_in_love_mini: Somehow, modern, plastic super detail locos have missed the point, in my opinion.

Are these sitting on fibre based rails? I have quite a lot of this being unused, as I run all my locos on Dublo or Peco track.

Handyman


Thank you for the kind comments. Hopefully the images will be increased with others exhibiting their collection.

The rails are on fibre based sleepers, I believe of Wrenn or Gem manufacture, but not totally sure.

#22 Il Grifone

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Posted 26 December 2010 - 16:35

It looks like Peco to me, however I can't be sure.
Wrenn I would exclude as this had hideously oversized sleepers (It looks realistic because "the sleepers are scaled to match the rail" - not!) The rail was fixed to the sleepers by rather inadequate metal clips at about 3-4" intervals. In my youth, I bought some of this stuff and was very annoyed when the rail detached from the sleepers during my (probably hamfisted) attempt to curve it. Perhaps Dublo type curves were beyond its capabilities.
I was much happier with Pecoway, but the advent of the plastic based track meant it all finished up in the bin. (I favoured, and still do, Formoway - it has its defects, but at least is 00 and not H0 - Pity it's no longer available. How about it Bachmann? or do they only have the N gauge Farish items?)

Re plastic missing the point. At the moment I have a HD N2 trundling around an oval of Trix fibre track hauling a Playcraft mineral wagon a Trix 'Shell' tank wagon a Trix box car and a Trix lighted brake van, powered by an H & M Powermaster. :rolleyes:

Edited by Il Grifone, 11 February 2012 - 09:23 .


#23 bertiedog

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Posted 26 December 2010 - 17:29

Fibre based tracks, ........there have been several makers:-

The original flexible fibre base 16.5 mm track was made by Mantua in the United States from about 1934, and sold over here by Hamblings from about 1937/38, The next to use fibre base was Graham Farish, with Bromley production from about 1947, till they sold the line to another Bromley company, Wrenn. in the early 1950's. Farish changed over to plastic base next, using the Formoway brand label..


In the meantime, about 1947 Hamblings had made a fibre base track, and points, of their own, with white metal cast chairs, that was the first bull head fibre base. This lasted until stocks ran out in the 1960's, and when the special tools needed to assemble the chairs to the rail section ran out, never to return to production.

The Wrenn/Farish track was flatbottom rail for ease of manufacture. Wrenn designed their own unique closing frog points to go with the fibre based flexible track.

Gem, (George Mellor), made a fibre based flatbottom rail section track, I think that is what is in the pictures. They also did the track in TT gauge, as did Wrenn with the Fibre track.

ABC of London (Allan Brett Cannon), introduced fibre sleepers. both joined and separate, fitted with plastic chairs in the late 1950's, and Kings Cross did a fibre based track at one point in the 1960's with stamped brass chairs, all of these tracks falling by the wayside as Peco took over the market.

Peco did an early fibre base as well in short lengths to assemble in to yard lengths, before doing individual components and the plastic based track they still manufacture..

Both Mantua and Farish used fibre base as it was a standard insulation material, and both companies were basically in the radio parts business, Mantua made radio components and motors, and Farish made radio spares. The fibre for the Farish track was made at the Tonbridge Factory that Farish owned during the war. They made rubber products as well, mainly Kilner jar seals, and fibre washers.

I believe other makers like Arco made Fibre track bases, and KMR listed some in an advert in 1948. Stewart Reidpath also did fibre based track, but I think it was Mantua track base left over from pre-war, stored at Hamblings., with moulds for white metal chairs, that were then transfered to the Hamblings track. Hamblings took over S-R and had the same directors, so the 1947 Hamblings track was basically Stewart Reidpath designed.and made at Herne Bay in Kent..


One other rare make was Sayer Chaplin, in 1947/48 on, till about 1955, who were also electrical engineers and had supplies of fibre sheet etc and they did a stamped version to take flatbottom rail, which may have changed hands to Gem, the description and style are so similar.it may be the same fibre base.
Stephen.

#24 The Stationmaster

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Posted 26 December 2010 - 17:35

There was also Welkut - it used a smaller, nickel silver, rail section than Wrenn and came in both 2 and 3 rail form I believe.

#25 bertiedog

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Posted 26 December 2010 - 17:47

There was also Welkut - it used a smaller, nickel silver, rail section than Wrenn and came in both 2 and 3 rail form I believe.


I think that Welkut took over the fibre tooling from Wrenn, I had forgotten the maker, it was better track being nickel silver. and had more fastenings per section, later all chairs were fastened.


Another company involved with fibre track was Kirdon, again they were electrical engineers, and used to making fibre insulation gaskets, the technology behind using fibre sheet to make track bases.

Some of the Hamblings Track did not use Fibre base, but SRB board in individual sleepers form, it was quite a good track when nickel bullhead rail section was used, it took code 80 rail in metal chairs, fine scale for the 1950's.

Stephen.