Jump to content


Google Ads are only seen by non-members of RMweb - Create an RMweb account and you'll only receive modelling ads.

Photo
* * * * - 2 votes

OKWB - A "Hunslet" - the like never seen before

OO9 4mm




  • Please log in to reply
12 replies to this topic

#1 Kenton

Kenton

    Member


  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 8,835 posts
  • LocationWokingham

Posted 13 May 2010 - 20:45

Well it said it was a Hunslet on the packet.

A1 MODELS HUNSLET DIESEL LOCO BODYSHELL

I have just completed this brass kit build in a little over 4 hours including photography, and will post the how to with them tomorrow.

I just wanted to wet the appetite. A brass kit built and running, of course it will still need painting, something the beginner could do with some care and all for under a tenner.

There are only 12 parts Posted Image and if it all goes wrong what's the loss? Better to practice techniques or learn from scratch on something that you have dreamed of building for years. When you suceed you could always Ebay it, put it on a layout, or just keep it as an embarrassing joke.


Overview:

This is a whimsy kit and you soon get the feeling it was designed on the back of an envelope rather than by taking scale measurements from any real prototype. If it comes close to being a Hunslet diesel, I'm not sure which one and the instructions certainly do not give any suggestion.

That aside it is in the same general spirit of any OO9 scratch-built loco, and is a simple starter kit in brass. The instructions, essentially three short paragraphs on one side of an A4 sheet, leave some things to the imagination, but do contain black and white photographs of a completed model. With only 11 parts on the single fret, none of which can be called small, it really cannot be that difficult.

I do, however, take exception to the suggestion that the parts could be glued together. If you cannot learn to solder with this kit there is frankly no hope and further handling of brass should be left to some other life.

The "kit" has been designed to fit a Kato tram chassis which can easily be purchased from the OO9 society, on Ebay or rescued from another model. I have selected the Kato 0-4-0 tram chassis (#11-103), though others may fit. This is a reasonably compact, motorised and self-contained unit that runs very reliably, but on my limited experience performs better with additional weight on top. Other than that, just the usual paint and transfers will be required.

Edited by Kenton, 02 February 2012 - 15:55 .


Google Ads are only seen by non-members of RMweb - Create an RMweb account and you'll only receive modelling ads.

#2 Kenton

Kenton

    Member


  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 8,835 posts
  • LocationWokingham

Posted 14 May 2010 - 10:18

Some General Notes on Kit Building:

Always remove each etched part from the fret as you require it. It is also a good habit to mark with a felt pen any orientation of the part that may be a later cause of confusion. These parts are quite large and the fret tabs very thin so the part can easily be cut from the fret with a pair of snips. With a good quality fine file, ideally one retained only for brass work, file away the remnants of the fret tabs. Always try to file along the edge and not across it to minimise possible distortion. Often the best method to check the edge is to run a finger along it, the previous position of the tag should not be identifiable.

As with most brass kits, the half-etched fold lines are on the inside of the fold. Before folding, lightly score the inside of the half-etch with a scalpel blade so that the score line can be seen on the other side, but at the same time not cutting through the etch. It is also good practice to runs a sharp angle file along the groove and in many etched kits the fold lines then to be undersize to enable complete bends. Using a sharp metal rule, or, preferably, bending bars or a specialist hold-and-fold tool, fold the parts inwards along the fold lines.

#3 Kenton

Kenton

    Member


  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 8,835 posts
  • LocationWokingham

Posted 14 May 2010 - 10:23

Step-By-Step: Step 1

Identify the frame etch and fold down the sides to 90°.

Posted Image

The frame simply fits over the chassis, although some of the outside edge of the chassis mounting points needed to be removed with a file for a snug fit.

Posted Image

The ends of the frame are open by design to allow a choice of couplings to be fitted. We will return to this later.

#4 Kenton

Kenton

    Member


  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 8,835 posts
  • LocationWokingham

Posted 14 May 2010 - 10:29

Step-By-Step: Step 2

Next, identify the cab etch and clean the fold lines and the joining edges with a glass fibre pen. Tin the inside and edge of the joining edge as this will make this edge-to-edge join easier.

Posted Image

Fold each side inwards to form a box. Using a square to set the corners and resting the base of the cab on a flat surface run a fillet of solder into each of the bends. Only a very small amount of solder is required along with plenty of flux as the solder will run freely along the inside of the fold. Although not absolutely necessary, this is good practice for all folds to strengthen them.

Holding the open cab corner in a suitable clamp so that the edges are touching and lined up run the iron along this tinned join. Holding the cab against a square edged block of hardwood makes a simple and adequate clamp. Check that all corners are square and the cab sits flat.

Posted Image

Joining edges are one of the most difficult exercises in brass kit building so you should be pleased once this has been achieved. Place the cab unit to one side.

#5 Kenton

Kenton

    Member


  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 8,835 posts
  • LocationWokingham

Posted 14 May 2010 - 10:36

Step-By-Step: Step 3

Identify the short casing and its door etches.

Posted Image

Fold down the sides of the casing and strengthen as above. Placing the door with the half-etched face down, wrap the casing around the door. Pay attention to the fact that the handle holes are towards the top. Then tack solder each edge in position.

Tack soldering is the technique where very small bit of solder and little flux is used on a join just to hold parts in a position. Check that everything is square and there are no gaps then complete the joins by using more flux to run the solder along the entire join.

Posted Image

Never be tempted to use solder to fill gaps in brass kit building as it gives a very weak join and is bad technique. If the kit is so badly designed that the brass edges do not align correctly use scrap brass to add reinforcement plates or angles across the join.

#6 Mike Bellamy

Mike Bellamy

    Member


  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 3,030 posts
  • LocationMickleover, Derby

Posted 14 May 2010 - 10:39

In case anyone is interested in a larger scale, A1 also do a basic range of On30 body kits to fit a range of ready to run chassis. They are illustrated on M G Sharp's web site http://www.kato-unit...its-2884-0.html and were available from A1 who attended the 7mm Narrow Gauge show at Burton last weekend.

Mike

#7 Kenton

Kenton

    Member


  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 8,835 posts
  • LocationWokingham

Posted 14 May 2010 - 10:41

Step-By-Step: Step 4

Identify the long bonnet casing with its radiator grill and surround.

Posted Image

Fold up the sides of the bonnet and strengthen the bends as above. Then fit the grill frame to the inside of the sloping 3end of the bonnet. Once again tack solder first to check that the edges are flush then complete the join. There is no indication, in the instructions or photos of the completed model, if the grill goes behind or in front of the frame. It seems most likely to go behind so that is where it was soldered. A small amount of well fluxed solder on each corner is all that is required to laminate the grill in place.

Posted Image

#8 Kenton

Kenton

    Member


  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 8,835 posts
  • LocationWokingham

Posted 14 May 2010 - 10:47

Step-By-Step: Step 5

Identify the cab roof and the air conditioning unit.

Posted Image

Fold up the air conditioning unit and then clean it thoroughly, especially the edges. Before folding the roof sides down solder the air conditioning unit centrally on the roof, making sure it is on the top. Finally fold down the cab roof sides to an angle of about 60°.

Posted Image

#9 Kenton

Kenton

    Member


  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 8,835 posts
  • LocationWokingham

Posted 14 May 2010 - 10:55

Step-By-Step: Step 6

We now have the sub units built and can commence the final assembly.
Have a dummy run to get yourself familiar with the next steps.

Posted Image

The body should be constructed by tack soldering each part assembly to the cab, starting with the rear bonnet, followed by the front bonnet, the roof and then finally the frames. The most difficult step is making sure that the bonnets are central on the cab.

Posted Image

Only when you are happy with the positioning of each sub unit should you flood the join with flux and complete the join.

Posted Image

#10 Kenton

Kenton

    Member


  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 8,835 posts
  • LocationWokingham

Posted 14 May 2010 - 11:10

Step-By-Step: Step 7

Finally the buffer beams were soldered into the frames. This step was left to last as I wanted to establish the ride height and if the couplings would be best fitted to the chassis or the beams. In the end the chassis was chosen. The body is a simple push fit on the chassis.

Posted Image

Once complete to this stage the whole body should be washed in hot water to remove any excess flux. Then any excess solder removed using a suitable scraper, washed again and finally the brass burnished with a glass fibre pen.


Detailing:

There is none. All suggestions are welcome as always, along with any comments or other questions.


Conclusion:
Not exactly pretty, prototypical or difficult to build. Also compared to more serious kits it does not really represent value for money in terms of weight of brass per £ or number of parts per £, but then there are some baseline costs in just the etching process. There are some really nice kits in the A1 range and you shouldn't take this one as an example but like this rhey generally go together well.
  • Like x 4

#11 alcazar

alcazar

    Member


  • Banned
  • PipPip
  • 573 posts

Posted 14 May 2010 - 11:19

Might look more UK with a curved roof to allow rain to run off, rather than an air-conditioning unit.:rolleyes:

#12 jukebox

jukebox

    Member


  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 1,593 posts
  • LocationPerth (Western Australia)

Posted 14 May 2010 - 12:58

Brilliant "How To", Kenton!

I agree the price point is right, and for anyone who hasn't tried a kit, or thinks they can't solder, that looks like a great place to start learning.

#13 halfwit

halfwit

    Member


  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 1,332 posts

Posted 14 May 2010 - 13:15

Nicely done Kenton. Hopefully this might encourage people into the not-so-dark art of soldering. Although I feel that this kit could be easily assembled with just superglue?
Looking at their kits for 009 makes me wonder if some of them could be built to OOn3.








Also tagged with one or more of these keywords: OO9, 4mm

Google Ads are only seen by non-members of RMweb - Create an RMweb account and you'll only receive modelling ads.