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Hornby Dublo wheel hanger clips





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#1 derekoak

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Posted 07 December 2009 - 08:56

Having recently decided to drag out a box of Dublo 3-rail (that's sat in the loft for 40 years now!) for two new grandchildren I am conscious that the running qualities of the metal wagons may well tax the pulling qualities of the locos, even after they're serviced. The wheelsets seem to be attached by spring clips, and a photo of what I think they are appears her: http://s48.photobuck...F00-F99/F81.jpg

But, for the life of me I can't work out how to get them out so I can clean off the bearing faces properly. There has to be a knack to it: can anyone explain?

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#2 geoff

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Posted 07 December 2009 - 10:39

The axle carrier has a tag which passes through the floor of the vehicle and is bent over. You will not have too many opportunities to straighten and re-bend this before it breaks off. There is no bearing face to speak of, the axle runs in the hole in the pressed steel carrier.The back of the axle guard/ axle box is plain flat metal.

Geoff

Having recently decided to drag out a box of Dublo 3-rail (that's sat in the loft for 40 years now!) for two new grandchildren I am conscious that the running qualities of the metal wagons may well tax the pulling qualities of the locos, even after they're serviced. The wheelsets seem to be attached by spring clips, and a photo of what I think they are appears her: http://s48.photobuck...F00-F99/F81.jpg

But, for the life of me I can't work out how to get them out so I can clean off the bearing faces properly. There has to be a knack to it: can anyone explain?


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#3 derekoak

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Posted 07 December 2009 - 13:16

The axle carrier has a tag which passes through the floor of the vehicle and is bent over. You will not have too many opportunities to straighten and re-bend this before it breaks off. There is no bearing face to speak of, the axle runs in the hole in the pressed steel carrier.The back of the axle guard/ axle box is plain flat metal.

Geoff



Geoff

Brilliant. So simple: really must try to engage brain a bit sooner. Thanks very much for your help

Derek O

#4 geoff

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Posted 07 December 2009 - 13:57

You're Welcome Derek, nice to hear the old train set is coming out to do duty again. If you have some of the newer SD6 models you may find they have a plastic/nylon carrier which just pushes through a slightly wider slot. They have a 'nose' which lodges on the floor to hold them in if I remember correctly. On second thoughts, they may be the Wrenn version. It has been too long since I tinkered with them.

Geoff

Geoff

Brilliant. So simple: really must try to engage brain a bit sooner. Thanks very much for your help

Derek O



#5 Sc59401

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Posted 07 December 2009 - 15:42

Always good to hear about Hornby Dublo stock being resurrected. A spot of light machine oil on each Hornby Dublo axle end will be appreciated by the locomotive. Precision oilers are good for this but you can also use something like a dressmaking pin to deposit the oil.

If you have some of the newer SD6 models you may find they have a plastic/nylon carrier which just pushes through a slightly wider slot. They have a 'nose' which lodges on the floor to hold them in if I remember correctly. On second thoughts, they may be the Wrenn version.

Second thoughts correct, Geoff. The plastic axle carriers are found only on Wrenn versions.
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#6 geoff

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Posted 07 December 2009 - 16:49

Well done that man.

Second thoughts correct, Geoff. The plastic axle carriers are found only on Wrenn versions.
[/quote]
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#7 derekoak

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Posted 08 December 2009 - 08:47

[quote name='geoff' date='07 December 2009 - 16:49 ' timestamp='1260204559' post='39767']
Well done that man.

Second thoughts correct, Geoff. The plastic axle carriers are found only on Wrenn versions.
[/quote]
[/quote]

#8 derekoak

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Posted 08 December 2009 - 08:52

[quote name='derekoak' date='08 December 2009 - 08:47 ' timestamp='1260262072' post='40239']
[/quote]
[/quote]Thanks to both Geoff and Sc540. The joy of Dublo 3 rail (and this is where purists may hate me) is that it can be set up on lawns and carpets whereas the open-sleepered 2 rail type tends to suffer. Last did this with my children and expect (even though the Dublo stuff doesn't contain a "Thomas" or a "Percy") that my grandchildren will get as much pleasure from actually building their own railway rather than turning on a computer screen and having it all done for them.
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#9 Il Grifone

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Posted 08 December 2009 - 09:51

HD rolling stock is supposed to run down a 1 in 30 (it doesn't all manage it!), which is about 3 times as stiff as a pin point bearing (should start on 1 in 100). Careful cleaning of muck (white spirit - don't get it on the vehicle body) and rust (brass brush in mini drill) will help no end. A drop of oil will complete.

The locos should be capable of pulling at least 5 coaches without problems on level track and should manage about a scale 100mph with four. Exclude the R1 from this, but there aren't many 3 rail ones about (none are original).

Some of the SD6 and the diecast mineral wagon have the wheel hanger tags buried under the body. You would need to drill out the coupling rivet to dismantle these.

HD tinplate will normally bend twice before failing (Trix once), but care is needed.

Keep up the good work! with care, these will still be working when the modern stuff has all fallen to pieces. :D
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#10 keithyoung89

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Posted 15 December 2012 - 16:03

I have an elderly (1950s I think) Hornby wagon which uses wheel hanger clips as per this thread. I need to replace the metal wheels/axle with plastic to avoid shorting across the rails. However, the tags are not visible in the wagon itself and I think they may be bent over between the chassis and the wagon. The wagon appears to be attached to the chassis via two rivets, one for each coupling that goes through the coupling and wagon.

Is it correct that the tags are bent over between chassis and wagon and, if so, is it possible to dismantle the chassis/wagon to get at the tags to release them?

Thanks.

#11 Fat Controller

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Posted 15 December 2012 - 16:18

I have an elderly (1950s I think) Hornby wagon which uses wheel hanger clips as per this thread. I need to replace the metal wheels/axle with plastic to avoid shorting across the rails. However, the tags are not visible in the wagon itself and I think they may be bent over between the chassis and the wagon. The wagon appears to be attached to the chassis via two rivets, one for each coupling that goes through the coupling and wagon.

Is it correct that the tags are bent over between chassis and wagon and, if so, is it possible to dismantle the chassis/wagon to get at the tags to release them?

Thanks.

What sort of wagons are they? If they are covered vehicles of some sort, then unscrewing the screw that holds the body in place will permit you to access the folded-over top of the metal strip. If they are open wagons, then you'll have to drill out the rivets holding the coupling and body in place. I used this process to swap the nylon wheels for Jackson metal ones about thirty-five years ago. More recently, I've replaced the Hornby-Dublo mazak chassis with Parkside or Red Panda ones- the bodies soldier on at 50+ years old.

#12 Dublodad

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Posted 15 December 2012 - 16:50

Sounds like the diecast mineral wagon, yes you will need to drill out the rivets to remove the body.


terry

#13 keithyoung89

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Posted 15 December 2012 - 18:53

What sort of wagons are they? If they are covered vehicles of some sort, then unscrewing the screw that holds the body in place will permit you to access the folded-over top of the metal strip. If they are open wagons, then you'll have to drill out the rivets holding the coupling and body in place. I used this process to swap the nylon wheels for Jackson metal ones about thirty-five years ago. More recently, I've replaced the Hornby-Dublo mazak chassis with Parkside or Red Panda ones- the bodies soldier on at 50+ years old.

Yes, it's a diecast open wagon. I think I'll be leaving it as it is - even if I drill out the rivets i wouldn't have the wherewithall to replace them. I also have a tin-plate open wagon where the tops of the tags are visible so I'll be able to deal with that one.
Thanks for all help.

#14 Il Grifone

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Posted 16 December 2012 - 10:47

The rivets can be drilled out from inside the wagon - centre pop the dome of the rivet and use a small drill* for just a few millimetres. Then take off the remainder of the dome with a larger drill. The body can then be pulled off the underframe, allowing replacement of the wheelsets - it should only be necessary to remove one tag per axle. Then just press the body back on. A spot of adhesive might be necessary to hold it.
Alternatively drill* the rivet right through from below and reassemble with suitable screws and nuts. (Replacement rivets are available (at a price) on eBay.)

Replacement underframes are available (scale 17' 6"), but probably not worthwhile as the Dublo mineral wagon has been stretched to fit the standard underframe.

* I'll measure up a rivet and give the diameters later.

Edited by Il Grifone, 16 December 2012 - 10:49 .


#15 keithyoung89

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Posted 23 December 2012 - 17:48

Thanks for advice re how to drill out the rivets - I may have a crack at this after Christmas. If I were to replace the rivets, how would I round them over to fix them? Just a wee bash with a hammer?



#16 Il Grifone

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Posted 23 December 2012 - 22:59

Thanks for advice re how to drill out the rivets - I may have a crack at this after Christmas. If I were to replace the rivets, how would I round them over to fix them? Just a wee bash with a hammer?


This would do, but I prefer a drill press myself. You need a suitable anvil and a punch of course. I use a suitably sized nail. A spot of cyano or epoxy is an alternative way of fixing the rivet and enables the reuse of the originals.

To replace damaged couplings, the rivets can be pressed out of the normal underframes and bogies, using a thin rod that will fit in the central bore.

I'll get back with the dimensions of the rivets.

#17 Les Bird

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Posted 26 December 2012 - 15:08

Should you be unlucky enough to break the wheel hanger tabs, these are also available on eBay



#18 Il Grifone

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Posted 28 December 2012 - 01:10

The tags can be repaired with solder and a strip of metal or epoxy or even blu-tak.<br /><br />If you need replacements, a scrap wagon is often cheaper than the spares.....

#19 keithyoung89

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Posted 07 January 2013 - 21:41

Thanks for all the advice. I'll try drilling the rivets out and then using epoxy to re-fix the old rivets.



#20 brian r w

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Posted 19 February 2013 - 23:46

I have an elderly (1950s I think) Hornby wagon which uses wheel hanger clips as per this thread. I need to replace the metal wheels/axle with plastic to avoid shorting across the rails. However, the tags are not visible in the wagon itself and I think they may be bent over between the chassis and the wagon. The wagon appears to be attached to the chassis via two rivets, one for each coupling that goes through the coupling and wagon.

Is it correct that the tags are bent over between chassis and wagon and, if so, is it possible to dismantle the chassis/wagon to get at the tags to release them?

Thanks.

knock wheel gently off axle, drill out the wheel to take a piece of BIRO tube slightly longer than the wheel thickness push back onto the axle set the back to back  & job done, saving the cost of new , all my old three rail running better than some of the new stuff .


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#21 Il Grifone

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Posted 20 February 2013 - 13:45

knock wheel gently off axle, drill out the wheel to take a piece of BIRO tube slightly longer than the wheel thickness push back onto the axle set the back to back  & job done, saving the cost of new , all my old three rail running better than some of the new stuff .


An excellent scheme, but I always manage to drill out the wheels askew, when I try this (ham handed), and a reamer might be easier. It is of course essential to insulate the wheels all on the same side to avoid shorts and might be advisable to insulate both sides to avoid mysterious shorts through the metal couplings. (My Trix 0-6-2T suffered from these when I first bought her - Trix locos have the chassis live to the centre rail pickup.)

Re better running, I only cured one of my full brakes of stickiness, by replacing the plastic wheels with metal. It had the same drag as two normal coaches and new plastic wheelsets made little difference (OK on other coaches).

Edited by Il Grifone, 20 February 2013 - 13:49 .








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