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An engine shed for a GWR branch-line





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#1 Chubber

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Posted 25 January 2012 - 15:58

As I do not like any of the commercially available single road engine sheds I have decided to make my own based on a GWR prototype.

For the following information and the drawings I'm working from I'm indebted to Richard [Wheeltapper] and David [BigCheesePlant]
The building is based on Wallingford shed in the 1930s......
"A brick built depot with a slated roof and small lean-to office at the gable end. A coaling platform stood adjacent to the shed , and a water tower , probably a GWR addition, was provided.
The line was opened in 1866 as the Wallingford and Watlington Railway , but never went further than Wallingford from Cholsey. The shed could have been built at this period . Further research , however indicates that it could have been an 1890 replacement of an original shed built in 1866. This would have made the depot of GWR origin as the W & W Railway was absorbed by the GWR in 1872. The depot measured 50 feet x 20 feet overall.
On 31/12/1947 the one locomotive allocated to the shed was 0-4-2 Tank 1447
The Depot Closed in February 1956 . It was a sub shed to Didcot "


Herewith a picture of progress on the walls complete with the blue brick pier arrangement, made from four/five layers of Packeto-Cornoflako and mount-card.

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For the blue brick plinths I cut two strips of Packeto-Cornoflako [P-C] with 45 degree edges, then covered them with blue brick paper. To do that, and get the angle bend in the paper, I scribed two lines on the reverse of the paper about 0.75mm apart and pre-folded them together several times to make sure they folded evenly down the 30cm lengths. Then I Prit-Stik'd the paper strips, folded them almost together and pushed each of the bevelled card into the fold, moulding the paper around the sharp bevel as best as I could. After a few minutes I burnished the 45 degree bevel with my scalpel handle to 'harden' the angled edge [which also gives a more convincing engineering brick shine to the paper] and when both were dry, I stuck the slightly narrower strip on top of the wider one to make the double bevel top edge. To mitre the corner, I laid a strip out flat, and using a Stanley knife guided by a little perspex 45 degree square I cut through the card.

I've tried to keep the flashing reasonably correct, marking the wall/roof pieces to a realistic length, and I've deliberately cut the 'lower' edge of each run of slate paper [Scalescenes] to include a little of the dark wavy edge so that it gives the impression of the slight irregularity and thickness of what would have been natural hand-cut slates. The chimney pot is made from two separate strips of newspaper twiddled around a cocktail stick, then twiddled with acrylic paint, mounted on squares of card. After making up the wrapper of black cartridge paper for the stove, I rubbed it over with a soft-lead pencil to give the requisite shine.

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I first fitted a false 'under-roof' in 2mm pasteboard that was infintessimally larger than the outline of the walls. The brown wooden fascia boards are glued to it's edge AFTER the cartridge paper/slate paper has been fitted with a realistic overhang. This allows the observer to see a more life-like thin edge of the outside slates, rather than a 2mm thickness. As I'm not sure if I've explained that very well, I've done a J.A. type sketch....

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Now , the smoke troughs. The drawings fortunately show them as rectilinear but to get to the track for cleaning et cetera they will have to be removable so I have decided to fix them to, and remove them with the roof.
Here's a start, 1/4" balsa-wood sandwiched between some thin card. The short lengths of wood inside the chimneys helped building up the sides. The whole then liberally painted with shellac [white knotting] and sanded all round when dry. It allows clean sharp edges, and really strengthens a potentially flimsy structure, given my foregoing observations re 'removeability'.

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The plans show three rafters, with substantial steel rods reaching upwards at an angle from their ends to join with another hanging down from the ridge joint in a sort of 'Mercedes' sign configuration. As you'll not see the inside of the ridge I've left a triangular piece to which to glue the top of the smoke trough.


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It's a little tricky fitting the sub-roof around two different length ends and four chimneys, but luckily it worked reasonably well, and now awaits a covering of slate-paper stuck to cartridge paper.

Finally, an interior view, the inner 'curtain' wall in engineering brick with the steel framed windows, the bricks above the windows supported on a steel strip lintel, after the fashion of the drawing below. The walls are some 2ft thick at the bottom and the very few rafters and trusses are backed up by a 'Mercedes symbol' of substantial iron rods, which pass from the walls through the sides of the trough to join with a vertical rod hanging down from the central roof, so absorbing the outward push of the roof and so supporting the smoke troughs, which all my research to date indicate were made from wood, lined with thin steel sheet.

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I'll try to keep things up to date as I go along and hope this is useful to someone.



Doug


I'm sorry if more than one of any picture appears, or appears out of order, I've never yet managed to post a full thread here without a co%k-up!

D

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Edited by Chubber, 25 January 2012 - 16:05 .

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#2 Kris

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Posted 25 January 2012 - 16:05

Very nice.

#3 Benbow

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Posted 25 January 2012 - 16:17

As ever Doug truly inspirational. Knocks the plasticard efforts into a cocked hat in my opinion. You should write a book on your methods!
Best wishes and look forward to the next installment
Roger
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#4 amdaley

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Posted 25 January 2012 - 17:23

Thats a smashing looking job. It really looks the part.
Well done & looking forward to more :good_mini:

#5 jcm@gwr

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Posted 25 January 2012 - 20:14

Very nice!
Jeff

#6 PaternosterRow

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Posted 26 January 2012 - 11:59

Very nicely executed. The external wall and smoke hood detailing are superb. Smashing.

Regards

Mike

#7 Job's Modelling

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Posted 26 January 2012 - 12:15

Thanks for posting the drawings and picture.
I hope they help me to make better models.

Very nice building !

Regards,
Job

#8 Sidecar Racer

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Posted 26 January 2012 - 13:20

ditto.gif

#9 George Hudson

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Posted 26 January 2012 - 15:33

Top quality job! Really well observed model and a helpfully documented build.
Andrew

#10 Chubber

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Posted 26 January 2012 - 20:36

Thank you for your kind remarks, I've decided to have a break from those dreaded smoke hoods so have had a go at some door hinges with a length of brass strip and some 0.75mm florists wire. They'll be a little over-scale unless I can cobble up something finer.

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Doug

Edited by Chubber, 26 January 2012 - 20:37 .

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#11 N15class

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Posted 27 January 2012 - 00:25

  • You have made a fantastic model, I cant wait to see it completed. The hinges look like they will look fine. Hand cut slates are as good if not better than machine cut ones. The wavy look to slating is the guy nailing them on it is all done by eye, I have nailed thousands of the things.
  • Keep up the excelent work.


#12 BrushType4

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Posted 27 January 2012 - 09:57

Nice job and I really like your pencil drawings too. :)

#13 iL Dottore

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Posted 27 January 2012 - 10:39

That is really a very nice piece of work, the chimney, chimney breast and Aga stove (is it an Aga - certainly looks like it) assembly is particularly superb.

I've never been a fan of card modelling, but this superb work has given me the impetus to do something the my unused sheets of brick paper. Although, I'm not sure that I'll be using Mr Kellogg's finest building material as a base.

I hope that you'll be posting more of your efforts.

F

#14 Crichel Down

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Posted 27 January 2012 - 17:13

Doug, you mention that the slate paper is Scalescenes.

Are the brick papers also from Scalescenes? The brickwork looks excellent, and the model as a whole is truly inspirational.

#15 Chubber

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Posted 27 January 2012 - 18:24

Again, thank you to those kind enough to post, hi, CD, yes, all the texture papers I use are Scalescenes,

TX27 Dark Blue
TX23 Dark Red Brick for the outer 'piers'
TX01 Red Brick for the end walls, crew room walls and walling around the windows
TX05 Painted Brick for the upper inner walls
TX02 Brown Brick for the inner lower walls.

I used TX02 because I wanted to make them look like really dirty red brick, but didn't trust myself to be sparing enough with the scraped black artist's pastel that I have weathered most of it with so far. I also used a little Raw Sienna pastel. [A sort of dirty yellow/brown]

I hope that helps,

Doug

PS The windows are done as per Post 17 here http://www.rmweb.co....s-the-best-way/

Edited by Chubber, 27 January 2012 - 18:27 .


#16 Mustermark

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Posted 28 January 2012 - 02:19

That's more fantastic modeling. I love the last photo of the interior... with the roof on you could have told me that was the real thing.

#17 Colin_McLeod

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Posted 28 January 2012 - 13:16

Superb modelling. Congratulations on an excellent piece of work.

#18 Captain Kernow

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Posted 29 January 2012 - 21:07

Superb, Doug - I can only echo what others have said, especially with regards to your publishing a book about card structure modelling!
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#19 Chubber

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Posted 31 January 2012 - 10:03

Thank you for the 'likes' etc, much appreciated.

The door hinges are doing my head in at the moment! Also, adding some discrete lighting, as I do not like to see a model 'strung' with wiring, and as I merely want a bright glow inside to show up the bits and pieces I'm going to put one LED ina plastic tube and glue it to the inside front wall, in a position such that it is not immediately visible to the casual mouse who wanders up to have a peek inside....

[Pictures to follow (LED light, not mouse...)]

Doug

#20 Benbow

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Posted 31 January 2012 - 12:35

Now that's a good idea.....a mouse as per a Terence Cuneo painting.... :nono: no? OK then
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#21 Removed a/c_jonte

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Posted 31 January 2012 - 15:16

A wonderful piece of modelling, Doug, and thanks for sharing.

May I ask whether you will be sealing the brick paper and weathering pastels when you've finished, and if so, what product(s)/method(s) will you use?

#22 Chubber

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Posted 31 January 2012 - 15:42

Hi, Jonte,

I've given it a light spray of hair-laquer as I've gone along to keep the pastel in one place, and when it's finished, I'll mask off the windows with Post-it Notes and give it a spray of Lidl waterproofing spray that is sold at about £3.00p for walking boots, suede shoes, anoraks [good for us then?].

I also spray it into the lid until there is enough to apply with a soft brush to the lower edges of card structures that will be close to ballasting or other wet proceedures.

As each element of my buildings is coated/brushed with shellac in the form of 'White Knotting' on assembly, that additionally keeps things straight and square. It also makes the card strong and easily sanded.

Hope this helps,

Doug

#23 Jason T

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Posted 31 January 2012 - 15:50

Beautiful structure. It is making me question whether I should have gone down the brick paper route rather than plastikard.

#24 Stubby47

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Posted 31 January 2012 - 15:54

Beautiful structure. It is making me question whether I should have gone down the brick paper route rather than plastikard.

Definitely (it's much cheaper to chuck away when you make a c*ck of it - not that Doug ever does that.)

#25 Removed a/c_jonte

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Posted 01 February 2012 - 15:00

Hi, Jonte,

I've given it a light spray of hair-laquer as I've gone along to keep the pastel in one place, and when it's finished, I'll mask off the windows with Post-it Notes and give it a spray of Lidl waterproofing spray that is sold at about £3.00p for walking boots, suede shoes, anoraks [good for us then?].

I also spray it into the lid until there is enough to apply with a soft brush to the lower edges of card structures that will be close to ballasting or other wet proceedures.

As each element of my buildings is coated/brushed with shellac in the form of 'White Knotting' on assembly, that additionally keeps things straight and square. It also makes the card strong and easily sanded.

Hope this helps,

Doug


Most helpful, Doug, thanks.
I shall also use it to seal my duffel bag!!

Jonte