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Tucking Mill




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#26 justin1985

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Posted 03 March 2012 - 22:45

I'm really glad I noticed this thread - this new layout is looking great Jerry! Nice to see some of the David Eveleigh tramway coaches made up too - mine are still in the gloat box ...

A quick question on the pantiles - Kibri's website doesn't have any illustrations of the plastic sheeting, and there appear to be one or two variations on "tiles" - I don't suppose you know which article number the one you've used is? I bought a sheet of Noch pantiles ("dachstein") from Warley last year, which look good, but are made of a rubbery material, and were very expensive for what they were! The Kibri range looks better, and much better value!

Justin

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#27 queensquare

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Posted 03 March 2012 - 23:35

I am looking forward to hearing more about tucking and fulling.

Dr Spooner


As promised, a few words on tucking and fulling. Both processes are linked to the wool trade, namely the cleaning of the cloth to remove the natural oils and lanolin. In medieval times the cloth was cleaned by treading it in vats of stale urine for up to eight hours, the raw material for which was gahered from local urban areas. This joyous activity was replaced in later years by, amongst other processes, rubbing the cloth with Fullers Earth, known logically as fulling.
There was a tucking mill in Horsecombe vale serving the thriving local wool trade in the 18 century, hence the name of the SDJ viaduct and small hamlet and it was pure chance that the mill next to the coal canal was later used to grind the Fullers earth which was mined locally. The Fullers Earth was mined on Odd Down and piped down to settling tanks in Horsecombe Vale after which it was laid out on the floor of drying sheds before being ground to a fine powder and bagged in the mill before being taken away on the North Somerset Light, (in reality being carted to the SDJ sidings at Midford) .
Fullers Earth is still extensively used today in a wide range of roles from cosmetics and the treatment of skin conditions to fine filters in protective masks for chemical warfare although it is no longer mined in the Bath area.

Jerry

ps. if looking up tucking on the interweb then be careful what you find. I discovered in my researches that the process that chaps who like to dress as ladies use to disguise their excess undercarriage is also known as tucking - you have been warned!
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#28 queensquare

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Posted 04 March 2012 - 00:14

I'm really glad I noticed this thread - this new layout is looking great Jerry! Nice to see some of the David Eveleigh tramway coaches made up too - mine are still in the gloat box ...

A quick question on the pantiles - Kibri's website doesn't have any illustrations of the plastic sheeting, and there appear to be one or two variations on "tiles" - I don't suppose you know which article number the one you've used is? I bought a sheet of Noch pantiles ("dachstein") from Warley last year, which look good, but are made of a rubbery material, and were very expensive for what they were! The Kibri range looks better, and much better value!

Justin


Evening Justin,
I'm afraid I don't have any packaging for the Kibri pantiles and, having just rumaged through my tin of embossed plastic I don't have any complete sheets left which show the reference number on the back. I got mine, along with the stone sheets, from a customer I built Midsomer Norton for years ago and I do remember they were marketed as being suitable for Z scale. I have some Volmer sheets I picked up which have the number 7353 stamped on them but, although quite nice, are not as good as the Kibri ones. I wouldn't mind getting some more myself as I only have an ever dwindling selection of offcuts left.
Sorry I can't be any more help,

Jerry

#29 justin1985

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Posted 04 March 2012 - 16:11

Thanks for the tip Jerry - I've just put in an order with my favorite German retailer for a whole selection of Kibri N and Z roof texture sheets to give them a try - I hadn't thought to try the Z range (and wasn't aware of the Kibri range at all until I saw this thread!). At €3.50 each, I just ordered a whole selection (and also a nice Kato NOHAB diesel reduced to €75.00 - whoops)

I noticed an interesting sheet in the N range called "Welleternit- und Blecheindeckung" which appears to have a particularly good corrugated iron texture, as well as the "tinplate", which looks more like the crimped zinc panel roofs that are common on the continent and on very new buildings here. I just hope they're thinner than the Ratio sheets we get here!

Justin

#30 Izzy

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Posted 06 March 2012 - 19:30

The new lights are a little yellow for my taste and I will change the bulbs for something a little 'whiter' before I get stuck into the scenic work. Rich Brummits info on what the various figures on the bulbs refer to was very useful.

Jerry


Rather than replace the tube, or if you can’t find a more suitable one, you could try cooling the tube’s output by putting silver reflectors around it. Baking foil is a good and cheap option, which can withstand being near heat and can be glued into place.

Silver and gold reflectors are often used in photography to either cool down or warm up the light whether it is natural (ambient) or artificial (flash etc) as cooler light makes objects look sharper whilst warmer light softens them. Cool for products and warm for portraiture is the average.

Although the actual colour temperature of light varies throughout the day, the notational mean average daylight balanced temperature is usually given as around 5,500K. Flash output is set to produce this and can often look ‘harsh’ in comparison to ordinary lighting, which is usually around the 2,000K – 4,000K mark.

A brief idea of the colour temperature of light can be found here - http://www.digicamin...hitebalance.htm

Hope this might be of use/interest

Izzy
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#31 justin1985

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Posted 23 March 2012 - 20:09

To follow up on the pantiles, I ordered a selection of the German plastic sheets, which arrived last week.

SDC16850.JPG

To the lower left is the Noch rubbery sheet, which looks OK, and has good relief, but this might be largely due to the weathering wash that is pre-applied. To the lower right is the half of the Kibri "N gauge" roof tiles sheet (3-7970) that comes closest to British style pantiles - this seems slightly overscale, but simultaneously doesn't have a great deal of relief.

The top sheet in the picture is the Kibri "Z gauge" roof tiles sheet (Dachplatten Pfanne Z 3-6920). To me this looks most suitable for 2mm or British N. The scale of the individual tiles seems about right, and the depth of relief, while varied over the sheet (clearly not deliberately), is convincing. I'm pretty sure this is the one Jerry has used?

All of the Kibri sheets are just over 1mm thick, so considerably thinner than equivalent Ratio offerings. The corrugated iron sheet looks pretty similar to the Ratio one, but with perhaps slightly more restrained relief, and of course thinner and easier to work with. All of the sheets are €3.55 - quite a bargain!

Justin
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#32 Tim V

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Posted 23 March 2012 - 20:52

Look more like Romans to me - which is far more useful for Somerset.

#33 queensquare

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Posted 23 March 2012 - 21:35

To follow up on the pantiles, I ordered a selection of the German plastic sheets, which arrived last week.

SDC16850.JPG

To the lower left is the Noch rubbery sheet, which looks OK, and has good relief, but this might be largely due to the weathering wash that is pre-applied. To the lower right is the half of the Kibri "N gauge" roof tiles sheet (3-7970) that comes closest to British style pantiles - this seems slightly overscale, but simultaneously doesn't have a great deal of relief.

The top sheet in the picture is the Kibri "Z gauge" roof tiles sheet (Dachplatten Pfanne Z 3-6920). To me this looks most suitable for 2mm or British N. The scale of the individual tiles seems about right, and the depth of relief, while varied over the sheet (clearly not deliberately), is convincing. I'm pretty sure this is the one Jerry has used?

All of the Kibri sheets are just over 1mm thick, so considerably thinner than equivalent Ratio offerings. The corrugated iron sheet looks pretty similar to the Ratio one, but with perhaps slightly more restrained relief, and of course thinner and easier to work with. All of the sheets are €3.55 - quite a bargain!

Justin


Evening Justin,
the top sheet does indeed look like the sheets I have. Thanks for posting, very useful.

Jerry

#34 josh993

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Posted 12 September 2012 - 17:35

Do we get any sneak peaks before Swindon then? :D
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#35 queensquare

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Posted 12 September 2012 - 18:13

Hi Josh,
I've done lots of work ready for Steam this weekend. All is working off the new control panel including sections and uncoupling magnets. Basic scenery is in place and the track has been painted. I'm off to the workshop again this evening to do a bit more - if I get a chance I will take some pics although it does look like a hurricane has just been through there. It remains very much a work in progress, its debut as a finished layout (sic) is Warley in November.
I have also built some new wagons so I want to try and get couplings on those before the weekend.

What day are you coming? Gascupboard Dave and John Gymer of Youchoos are helping on saturday, I have a couple of well known 2FS modellers of this parish coming to help me on sunday.



Jerry

#36 queensquare

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Posted 12 September 2012 - 18:17

Forgot to add, I have today agreed to take Tucking Mill to the 2mm AGM in Bedford on saturday 6 october.

Jerry
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#37 josh993

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Posted 12 September 2012 - 18:59

Hope to be there on Sunday Jerry - Will pop over and say Hello

Look forward to any updates in the meantime.
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#38 Tim V

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Posted 13 September 2012 - 19:58

Even more of an incentive to go to Bedford!
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#39 65179

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Posted 13 September 2012 - 20:16

Hi Jerry,

Disappointed I won't get to see progress on Tucking Mill. I shall be further north playing with a slightly bigger 2mm layout!

Simon
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#40 richbrummitt

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Posted 13 September 2012 - 20:45

See you Sunday, Jerry. I hope. Have you seen the Camerton Collieries Mathieson wagon? You might want one of these too. ;)

..and I'm blaming you for having scoured the Mathieson website and bought more of these wagons. ;)

Edited by richbrummitt, 13 September 2012 - 21:07 .

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#41 queensquare

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Posted 13 September 2012 - 21:16

Thanks all.
Yes Rich I bought some more Mathieson wagons a couple of weeks ago. I got four of the Camerton ones and a couple of the A J Smith - shame its Queensquare in Bristol not Bath. Need to renumber, weather, replace wheels and add couplings so probably won't feature this weekend but hopefully have them by Bedford.
See you over the weekend.

Jerry

#42 richbrummitt

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Posted 13 September 2012 - 22:05

I've got quite a number now, and none are really suitable for Oxfordshire. I have ordered a pair of YORKSHIRE ones :grin: The ones I bought at the weekend are now weathered but need wheels and couplings fitting. This requires drilling the headstocks (own choice) and carving the brake shoes - two jobs that are a bit of a PITA. I realise now that one of the wagons I attacked is a 'very limited' RHOS one.

What is your preferred method for re-wheeling? I have used the 14.2mm axles in the few that I have finished but I measure 12.25mm between W irons so if I could fit top hat bearings then the standard axles should fit and run quite nicely too? Something to ponder.

#43 queensquare

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Posted 13 September 2012 - 22:36

You could get Robbies to do some sides for suitable Oxfordshire prototypes - my Highbury and a couple of others are done using them and I'm very pleased with them.

What is your preferred method for re-wheeling? I have used the 14.2mm axles in the few that I have finished but I measure 12.25mm between W irons so if I could fit top hat bearings then the standard axles should fit and run quite nicely too? Something to ponder.


I've also used the 14.2 axle length in the past but having recently acquired a little Unimat I'm thinking of turning the wheels down - they are very fine for N and require very little taking off.

I've also built the Barry Railway bolsters and Taff Vale brake van etches that Matheison do which I will have with me at the weekend - they will of course eventually be finished in NSLR livery.

Jerry
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#44 Nigelcliffe

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Posted 14 September 2012 - 06:51

I've also used the 14.2 axle length in the past but having recently acquired a little Unimat I'm thinking of turning the wheels down - they are very fine for N and require very little taking off.


Someone has suggested just pulling the Mathieson wheels off their axles and then pushing on 2mm ones.


- Nigel

#45 richbrummitt

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Posted 14 September 2012 - 12:35

You could get Robbies to do some sides for suitable Oxfordshire prototypes - my Highbury and a couple of others are done using them and I'm very pleased with them.


He does a couple that I would like and I have the details for the others. It's just a case of getting around to it.

I've also used the 14.2 axle length in the past but having recently acquired a little Unimat I'm thinking of turning the wheels down - they are very fine for N and require very little taking off.


Did you check how much and where from yet? It would save me the brain work if you had.

I've also built the Barry Railway bolsters.


They're in the cupboard hiding, along with the B&M 2 plank-er that is offered.

Someone has suggested just pulling the Mathieson wheels off their axles and then pushing on 2mm ones.


I've tried that too but it seems quite hit and miss whether you get wobble free wheels.

I had a thought earlier that you used to get axle cups, but I don't remember where from? They might glue straight in and provide another solution that is perhaps preferable, if it works.

Edited by richbrummitt, 14 September 2012 - 12:36 .


#46 The Stationmaster

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Posted 15 September 2012 - 19:48

Great to see it in action at Swindon today Jerry - very impressive even with a lot more scenic work to do. I should have inquired about the lever frame which looked to be a very nice job and was very sensibly arranged for point operation as you demonstrated. Looking forward to seeing it at Warley - if I can fight through the crowds.

#47 richbrummitt

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Posted 16 September 2012 - 18:18

Some photos from Steam today:

tucking_mill_1.JPG

Wagons by the mill awaiting loading/unloading.

tucking_mill_2.JPG

Cattle wagons in the process of shunting.

tucking_mill_3.JPG

A rather nice crane in need of a new coat of paint.

tucking_mill_4.JPG


Wagon loading (or unloading?)

tucking_mill_5.JPG

Bodmin having a rest

tucking_mill_6.JPG

The station building. Given the area this might be a busy moment?

tucking_mill_7.JPG

A 56xx in wartime livery has wandered onto NSLR lines and somehow found itself in charge of a special train. Some confusion will probably follow about how the carriage might be unloaded, but the station staff must be found first!
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#48 queensquare

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Posted 17 September 2012 - 09:39

Well I am pleased to report that Tucking Mill's first proper outing was a great success. Considering the layout had never really been run before it all worked pretty well. There were a few issues that came up, mainly to do with the fact I had over simplified the wiring which resulted in a lack of flexibility - a couple more isolating sections are required. I had painted the track a couple of days before the show and managed, in the process of clearing the flangeways with a 20 thou bar file, to memove the copper cladding on one of the points resulting in one of the commoin crossings being completely dead - a new feed was quickly soldered in and all was ok.
We had lots of spoonerisms resulting from the name and my short note relating to Tucking and Fulling.

Thanks to Steve Bedding, Rich Brummit and Missy Julia for helping out on sunday.

IMG_1582.JPG

IMG_1586.JPG

IMG_1588.JPG

Jerry
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#49 queensquare

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Posted 17 September 2012 - 12:33

Some photos from Steam today:
The station building. Given the area this might be a busy moment?



A 56xx in wartime livery has wandered onto NSLR lines and somehow found itself in charge of a special train. Some confusion will probably follow about how the carriage might be unloaded, but the station staff must be found first!


That's a shocking insinuation - some weeks passenger numbers reach double figures!!

There is an end loading dock at the quarry wharf off scene so anything that requires it needs to be shunted into the private siding. This is normally machinery and equipment for the quarry but the Squire makes use of it (as he owns it) for when he brings his motor car, or in this case his mothers carriage, down from town.

Who said I'm making it all up.........

Jerry

#50 richbrummitt

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Posted 17 September 2012 - 12:56

That's a shocking insinuation - some weeks passenger numbers reach double figures!!


If you calculate the passenger figures in base 2. :jester:

Who said I'm making it all up.........


No-one.
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