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Cleaning brass kits ...what do you use....

clean brass painting kits




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29 replies to this topic

#1 sunshine coast

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Posted 20 March 2012 - 17:10

After the usual soldering,flux etc and greasy fingers all over the nice brass kit ...what do you use/do to clean it up ready for painting ......

Regards Trevor .... :sungum:

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#2 Mike G

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Posted 20 March 2012 - 18:15

You won't find better info than this from Morgan Gilbert:

http://www.rmweb.co....-models-part-1/

Mike

#3 bike2steam

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Posted 20 March 2012 - 18:33

Wash down with water to neutralize any remaining flux, leave to dry on the spray booth turntable, then quickly spray over with Halfords Surface Cleaner to degrease, once dry ( about 15 minutes) spray the first coat of paint.

Edited by bike2steam, 20 March 2012 - 20:03 .


#4 coachmann

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Posted 20 March 2012 - 18:54

I expect everyone has their favourites. With me it has always been old fashioned panshine, in other words Vim or Ajax powder with hot water and a half inch brush.

#5 Kev_Lewis

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Posted 20 March 2012 - 19:33

My preference is for Sainsburys Basics Washing Up Liquid, warm water and an old toothbrush.

It's as cheep as chips and does the job. I've not had any problems with this method yet.

#6 Kenton

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Posted 20 March 2012 - 19:38

Another vote for Vim, a tooth brush and hot water - lots of it. Also have been known to put it in the dishwasher (without any of the dirty plates), soon shows up the soldering misfits, as they wash down the drain.

I find that greasy fingers is the worst enemy of getting undercoat to stick. So use gloves from final wash.

#7 halfwit

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Posted 20 March 2012 - 22:30

Cif and a 'value' toothbrush. Then when dry a wipe with cellulose thinners before painting.

Apparently you can also use Cif to clean sinks...
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#8 N15class

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Posted 21 March 2012 - 02:56

My preference is for Sainsburys Basics Washing Up Liquid, warm water and an old toothbrush.

It's as cheep as chips and does the job. I've not had any problems with this method yet.

The problem with this it contains lanolin and paint does not like it.

I use a scouring powder and viacal and tooth brush, (good for finding all the loose bits), just prior to painting. Again wearing gloves at all the final stages.

#9 sunshine coast

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Posted 21 March 2012 - 08:52

Thanks for the replies chaps ......

this question cropped up after a discussion in the shop yesterday...which ranged through Cola...acids ....various de-greasers and cleaners...but it looks like the vim/cif option is the most common ...and as is mentioned washing up liquids do have residues ..to add sparkle !!! :no:

Regards Trevor .. :sungum:

#10 bike2steam

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Posted 21 March 2012 - 10:52

Yes, the big problem with washing up liquids is lanolin, an additive to help prevent the skin on the hands from drying out too much, some have more than others, leaving a slight greasy surface.
Cola, and certain acids can prevent etch primers from doing the job properly.
I use Halfords Surface Cleaner as it does just what it sez on the tin, 'helps to prepare surfaces for painting'.

Edited by bike2steam, 21 March 2012 - 10:56 .


#11 32a

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Posted 21 March 2012 - 11:05

Cillit Bang allowed to soak and then washed with very hot water.

#12 JeffP

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Posted 21 March 2012 - 16:27

How does the Halford's surface cleaner work, then?

I get that it dissolves all grease etc, (at least, that's whsat I assume?), but where does the grease go when the s/c evaporates? Surely it would just go back on the model?

Or am I missing something yet again?

#13 iak

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Posted 21 March 2012 - 16:40

Ultrasonic bath with 1% Neutracon and then a good swill under the cold water tap.
Dinnae forget the Black Marigolds mind :sungum:

#14 Andy C

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Posted 21 March 2012 - 17:28

"Shiny Sinks" applied with a well worn soft toothbrush and plenty of hot water.

#15 Kev_Lewis

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Posted 21 March 2012 - 19:47

The problem with this it contains lanolin and paint does not like it.


While lanolin is usually added to the more expensive washing up liquids to make your hands soft, they don't bother putting it in the cheepo stuff.

Edited by Kev_Lewis, 21 March 2012 - 21:30 .


#16 Siberian Snooper

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Posted 21 March 2012 - 20:27

Cif and a 'value' toothbrush. Then when dry a wipe with cellulose thinners before painting.

Apparently you can also use Cif to clean sinks...


As above and the finish off in a warm ultrasonic bath, then stick it on the radiator to dry for about 20mins with a clean tea towel over it.

#17 Colin Stewart

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Posted 21 March 2012 - 20:33

Bar keepers friend is another option which works well for tarnished brass. For just after soldering to remove flux I wash it with cheap washing up liquid,

Hope that helps

Colin

#18 billbedford

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Posted 22 March 2012 - 00:11

The easiest way to remove flux residue after a soldering session is to pour boiling water over the model.

#19 micklner

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Posted 22 March 2012 - 08:20

Cif and washing up liquid combined , never had a problem . Handle model with kitchen towel

Edited by micklner, 22 March 2012 - 08:21 .


#20 John_Hughes

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Posted 22 March 2012 - 09:38

I know it horrifies people, but I just pop the model in the dishwasher; works a treat.

I've been told that it leaves some sort of residue, but I rather suspect that after the high-temperature rinse cycle all that's been washed away.

#21 Kenton

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Posted 22 March 2012 - 10:03

I know it horrifies people, but I just pop the model in the dishwasher; works a treat.

I've been told that it leaves some sort of residue, but I rather suspect that after the high-temperature rinse cycle all that's been washed away.


The possible issue is the use of rinse aid - you know the "adds sparkle" stuff. One of the reasons I offer to fill the dishwasher is that when it demands rinse aid I can sneak in a kit only wash. Of course the "sparkle" will remain after a high-temperature rinse because it is designed that way.

#22 John_Hughes

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Posted 23 March 2012 - 09:37

The possible issue is the use of rinse aid - you know the "adds sparkle" stuff. One of the reasons I offer to fill the dishwasher is that when it demands rinse aid I can sneak in a kit only wash. Of course the "sparkle" will remain after a high-temperature rinse because it is designed that way.


Ah, that makes sense!

I'm glad I'm not the only one doing this.....!

#23 RedgateModels

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Posted 23 March 2012 - 09:48

We've never used extra rinse aid or salt, just rely on what comes in the "tab" - we don't live in a hard water area though .....

#24 N15class

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Posted 23 March 2012 - 10:36

We've never used extra rinse aid or salt, just rely on what comes in the "tab" - we don't live in a hard water area though .....

The tabs contain salt and rinse aid anyway.

#25 JeffP

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Posted 23 March 2012 - 11:48

How does the Halford's surface cleaner work, then?

I get that it dissolves all grease etc, (at least, that's whsat I assume?), but where does the grease go when the s/c evaporates? Surely it would just go back on the model?

Or am I missing something yet again?


Anyone know the answer?








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