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carrs liquid glass window film - how to use

carrs window film glazing models liquid glass




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#1 colin penfold

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Posted 25 April 2012 - 17:44

Hi all,

Just bought a jar of carrs liquid glass window film. Really suprised and disappointed that it arrives with absolutely no instructions as to how to use it.

Anyone out there used it to glaze model buildings? I'd be grateful for any advice as to how to use it

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#2 brossard

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Posted 25 April 2012 - 18:41

Colin, you don't say what it looks like. I did look it up on the C&L site but, as you say, no explanation. I have used a US product that looks like PVA (and probably is) to create small windows. It may also be known as "canopy glue" for model aircraft. This is used by dipping a toothpick and running the liquid around the edge of the window aperture. Capilllary action tends to draw it together to make a film that dries clear. The problem I found was that gravity being what it is, the fluid tends to accumulate at the bottom of the aperture and doesn't look quite right. On the other hand I find Future floor polish aka Kleer handy for sticking windows with minimal blobbing (just doing some coaches with Shawplan flushglaze).

I'm quite interested in understanding the stuff - making a canine morning repast of windows is something most of us have done at one time or another.

John

#3 Merfyn Jones

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Posted 25 April 2012 - 19:24

Sounds like somthing I have used for years, mainly to glaze road vehicles and the odd loco soectacle window. It is a form of PVA but some are better than others. The one I use is Marvel Medium, recomended by a friend.
To overcome the gravity problem you must have the window appeture level. eg. For a car windscreen, suspend the model so the window sits in a position for gravity to help produce the curve. For a recessed window, hold it the other way for gravity to pull the liquid into the model.
I may not be too good at describing what I mean, but if you experement, you will see what I mean and it should give you good results.The windows on this were done this way.Merf.

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#4 colin penfold

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Posted 25 April 2012 - 20:49

Thanks for the posts chaps. Its a thick, off-white liquid that smells of nail varnish remover. In a plastic jar - massive hazchem sign, advice about not drinking it (worked that one out myself!) but no instructions -thanks C&L :O(

Unless somebody comes forward who has used this, I will experiment based on what you have said so far.

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#5 40-something

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Posted 26 April 2012 - 09:53

Hi Colin

I use Deluxe Materials Glue N Glaze for glazing small windows, I imagine its the same basic ingredients for the Carrs product, look like PVA. I've tried Canopy Glue but was unsucessful with it.

As Brossard has said, run a loaded toothpick around the window apertures a few times and gently drag across the opening when you feel the glue has gone slightly tacky. Works a treat for loco spectacle glass and small coach windows.

I recently bought Carrs Metal Blackening and again it came with no instructions but a search through RM Web provided enough info to help.
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#6 halfwit

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Posted 26 April 2012 - 09:57

I recently bought Carrs Metal Blackening and again it came with no instructions but a search through RM Web provided enough info to help.


http://www.finescale.../pdfs/ds001.pdf

Can't find a data sheet for window film though, or any other mention of the product.
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#7 colin penfold

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Posted 26 April 2012 - 17:54

With thanks to Pete from C&L Finescale I can now report the following:

Window Film – C1202

This is a cellulose compound of high surface tension, which dries to a thin clear film. It may be used for windows up to half an inch square or for items such as umbrellas and signal lenses when coloured with a felt-tip pen, etc. A loop of wire such as a bent paper clip is dipped into the liquid and drawn out with the film of liquid across it. It is immediately placed over the window frame to which it will adhere. After about five minutes it dries and shrinks to produce a tight glasslike pane. For application to curved diesel windows it may cast as a thin film over a Plasticene former, then trimmed and glued in. It may also be applied to small apertures as a blob on the end of a cocktail stick and drawn around across the hole. This will result in a lens effect due to the extra thickness at the edges.

I will post how I get on in due course but hopefully this is also here for posterity!
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#8 40-something

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Posted 26 April 2012 - 21:50

http://www.finescale.../pdfs/ds001.pdf

Can't find a data sheet for window film though, or any other mention of the product.


Thanks Paul, very handy to have

#9 JZ

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Posted 27 April 2012 - 10:45

I have found the Carr's will soften paint, probably due to the cellulose in it. Much prefer Microscale Krystal Klear or Humbrol equivilant as these do not effect the paint.
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#10 40-something

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Posted 27 April 2012 - 13:48

I have found the Carr's will soften paint, probably due to the cellulose in it. Much prefer Microscale Krystal Klear or Humbrol equivilant as these do not effect the paint.


I can vouch for Glue N Glaze and Canopy Glue as well as Krystal Klear for not affecting paintwork
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#11 gazmanjack

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Posted 04 May 2012 - 11:05

Another product out there is "Testors Model Masters Clear Parts Cement & Window Maker", item no. 8876C. I found this product to be very useful for filling in glazing on buildings, porthole windows (locos), vehicles.

Cheers, Gary.

#12 colin penfold

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Posted 18 August 2012 - 22:22

For those of you curious as to how I got on with the carrs window film you can see on my Burghclere Box project topic:

http://www.rmweb.co....__fromsearch__1







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