Jump to content


Google Ads are only seen by non-members of RMweb - Create an RMweb account and you'll only receive modelling ads.

Photo

Wright writes.....




  • Please log in to reply
21110 replies to this topic

#21101 Mallard60022

Mallard60022

    Member


  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 14,785 posts
  • Location36E most of the time, 36A some of the time and Seaton Junction part of the time.

Posted Yesterday, 18:15

Thanks Martin,

 

I don't know about knocking out quite complex models daily, but this is the progress so far today on the D&S Milk Van.

 

attachicon.gifDSC_8239.JPG

 

Dave Shakespeare's widow, Julie, called to see us today - actually more to see Mo - but I enjoyed seeing here again. A mate came around 2.30 pm to collect a couple of models, so I got back to this (having stated it after lunch) around about 3.00 pm. I tinkered with it for a couple of hours, watched a totally daft black and white film, had a meal, went back to it about 7.00 pm and put the iron down just after nine. 

 

Complex it might be, but when the fit of the parts is perfect, speedy construction is a doddle. Construction is with solder, of course. I don't wish to start further discussions/arguments/differences of opinion/etc, but anyone who advocates that a kit like this can be assembled with glue (of any kind) is talking through his/her hat. 

 

Regards,

 

Tony.  

Had the opportunity to examine this van today. What a cracker. I also had the chance to see Little B again after quite a long time. Inspirational with some really lovely scenic work and several, historically accurate cameo scenes. There were some trains to watch and some recently constructed loco's to admire. I quite like seeing WM and Brass/Nickel Silver in the 'raw', especially when they 'sound' so good too.   

Thanks Tony and Mo for the excellent lunch; much appreciated. Good to see Gilbert as well, however this meant I was outnumbered by BRER modellers :o

Tony has said in the past that goods vans and wagons are not one of his priorities as he enjoys more the coach and loco poart of the operatons. However I must say that the goods trains that ran today look just like those that I remember seeing all those years ago and the stock is beautifully modelled/finished. 

I survived the horribly wet A1 and am now enjoying an Organic Cider from Herefordshire, not bought lovally but purchased at the Telly Tubby Services on the M5 a couple of weeks ago.

ATB

Phil


  • Like x 4
  • Friendly/Supportive x 3
  • Thanks x 1

Google Ads are only seen by non-members of RMweb - Create an RMweb account and you'll only receive modelling ads.

#21102 Tony Wright

Tony Wright

    Member


  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 3,671 posts

Posted Yesterday, 20:44

Had the opportunity to examine this van today. What a cracker. I also had the chance to see Little B again after quite a long time. Inspirational with some really lovely scenic work and several, historically accurate cameo scenes. There were some trains to watch and some recently constructed loco's to admire. I quite like seeing WM and Brass/Nickel Silver in the 'raw', especially when they 'sound' so good too.   

Thanks Tony and Mo for the excellent lunch; much appreciated. Good to see Gilbert as well, however this meant I was outnumbered by BRER modellers :o

Tony has said in the past that goods vans and wagons are not one of his priorities as he enjoys more the coach and loco poart of the operatons. However I must say that the goods trains that ran today look just like those that I remember seeing all those years ago and the stock is beautifully modelled/finished. 

I survived the horribly wet A1 and am now enjoying an Organic Cider from Herefordshire, not bought lovally but purchased at the Telly Tubby Services on the M5 a couple of weeks ago.

ATB

Phil

Thanks Phil,

 

It was really good to see you and Gilbert today - what friendship and railway modelling is all about as far as I'm concerned. 

 

Regarding the freight stock: you're right, apart from a handful of wagons/vans, little of it is my work. Most of the kit-built freight stock has been provided by two Robs; Davey and Kinsey respectively. Many of the modified RTR wagons have been weathered by Rob Davey as well, though I've done a number, as has Richard Wilson. Some wagons on the M&GNR bit were built by Norman Turner. 

 

Thanks also for the comments about the Hornby unrebuilt BB. It isn't in its original box for sure, and it's not the very latest manifestation (it doesn't have the plug and socket between the loco and tender) but it is DCC-fitted. If anyone out there is interested in it (on sale on behalf of a widow), I think £95.00 is fair. Don't you? 

 

Regards,

 

Tony. 


  • Agree x 1

#21103 nerron

nerron

    Member


  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 289 posts
  • LocationSydney.Australia

Posted Yesterday, 20:50

Tony,

Could I trouble you for some advice? I have just acquired a PDK A2/3 kit on eBay and would be interested to hear if you have had experience with this kit and if you encountered any problems or issues with it. .Also should the tender wheels be spoke or disc? Markits show the complete A2 wheel set as having spoked wheels. Looking forward to meeting you in Sydney next year.


  • Friendly/Supportive x 1

#21104 Tony Wright

Tony Wright

    Member


  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 3,671 posts

Posted Yesterday, 22:06

Tony,

Could I trouble you for some advice? I have just acquired a PDK A2/3 kit on eBay and would be interested to hear if you have had experience with this kit and if you encountered any problems or issues with it. .Also should the tender wheels be spoke or disc? Markits show the complete A2 wheel set as having spoked wheels. Looking forward to meeting you in Sydney next year.

You can 'trouble' me all you wish, Ron. 

 

I built both the A2/3 and A2/2 kits when they were introduced by Crownline, at the turn of the century. Both builds appeared in the RM. The PDK kits are exactly the same. 

 

The PDK A2/3 isn't bad, though I personally prefer the DJH version. The cabsides on the PDK version aren't the right proportion, with the horizontal handrails set too low. This alters the shape of the lower cab for numbering and lining, squashing them up. The designer appears to have copied the right-hand side of the Isinglass drawing, which has the handrail too low. Oddly enough, the LH side is fine. The dodge, if it is a dodge, it to fix the handrail further up, hard underneath the windows. That way, the eye 'reads' the cabside proportions as correct. 

 

As supplied, it came with a resin boiler. Since I don't like working with resin (or any plastics) for locomotive construction, I acquired a SE Finecast cast metal A2 boiler (DJH will not sell parts separately). This was easy enough to modify to fit, and it's far better than the resin one - it can be soldered! 

 

I made it as 60500 EDWARD THOMPSON, which retained its original (four segment) boiler, round dome and stovepipe chimney until the early-'60s. It also has spoked tender wheels. 

 

The following pictures show ET in service on Little Bytham, hauling a cement train (which this class was best at!). Some of the pictures were taken quite some time ago. 

 

A2 3 60500 Crownline 01.jpg

 

A2 3 60500 Crownline 02.jpg

 

60500.jpg

 

A2 3.jpg

 

I hope these help. Ian Rathbone provided the lovely paint job. 

 

Looking forward to going down under next year, too.

 

Regards,

 

Tony. 


Edited by Tony Wright, Yesterday, 22:08 .

  • Like x 15

#21105 nerron

nerron

    Member


  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 289 posts
  • LocationSydney.Australia

Posted Yesterday, 22:58

Thanks Tony that is most helpful.I too would have preferred a DJH kit but I only paid 75 pounds for the PDK kit and it was from a fellow in Oz, so as well postage costs were considerable lower than from the UK..



#21106 Tony Wright

Tony Wright

    Member


  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 3,671 posts

Posted Today, 09:00

Thanks Tony that is most helpful.I too would have preferred a DJH kit but I only paid 75 pounds for the PDK kit and it was from a fellow in Oz, so as well postage costs were considerable lower than from the UK..

That's a bargain, Ron.

 

One thing I should have also mentioned - if you look at the pictures, you'll see I've had to nibble a bit away from the inside of the cylinders, to give clearance on tighter curves. Had I built this loco for Little Bytham, I needn't have bothered, but it was built originally for Stoke Summit, which had tighter than 3' curves in the fiddle yard in places. In normal viewing conditions, the 'nibbling' is invisible, but I've shown it by my lighting in the pictures. If your curves are 3' or greater, then you'll probably be able to leave the cylinders alone. 



#21107 gr.king

gr.king

    Member


  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 2,601 posts

Posted Today, 09:18

Is the bogie suspended on the traditional modelling dodge of the swing-arm? I'm fairly certain that I found it possible with Thompson pacific bogies, guided by a pin moving in a suitable curved slot, to leave the cylinders complete even if the loco had to cope with OO curves of somewhat less than 3ft radius.



#21108 Atso

Atso

    Member


  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 846 posts

Posted Today, 15:58

With help from the every helpful people at Dapol, I've got some spare valve gear and fitted it to my long term A1 'Flying Scotsman' project.

 

Flying Scotsman 14-12-17.jpg

 

This model started life as a cheaply obtained A3 2750 'Papyrus' and was in a really poor state when I got it. Work to date includes, replacing the valve gear, moving the various gubbings from the left to right hand side and carefully removing the superheater header covers from the smokebox. The cab (used because it had the correct number and I was being lazy) and tender are spares that I purchased some time ago and the corridor tender has been de-streamlined. I've still got some patch painting and frame lining to do but I'm very happy to finally see it running. It's supposed to represent the loco in early 1930's condition and therefore the cab isn't correct and the reversing level under the running plate should be the straight version but I'm happy to live with those relatively minor issues.


  • Like x 2

#21109 glo41f

glo41f

    Member


  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 345 posts
  • LocationColchester Essex

Posted Today, 16:13

Looking at the pictures of Edward Thompson on here ( I will refrain from commenting on the aesthetics of the loco!), I notice that the large cylinders are quite a bit outboard of the running plate. If this is to scale, were these beasts restricted as to where they could go as I could see some lineside impedimenta receiving terminal damage!

 

The cement train looks very clean. We had a Blue Circle Cement factory just north of Ipswich and all the wagons were absolutely covered in thick white powder as indeed was the adjacent station (Claydon), goods shed and signal box. The local houses also suffered from the fall out and there was great rejoicing when the plant closed.

 

Martin Long



#21110 Tony Wright

Tony Wright

    Member


  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 3,671 posts

Posted Today, 21:17

Is the bogie suspended on the traditional modelling dodge of the swing-arm? I'm fairly certain that I found it possible with Thompson pacific bogies, guided by a pin moving in a suitable curved slot, to leave the cylinders complete even if the loco had to cope with OO curves of somewhat less than 3ft radius.

It is Graeme. 

 

As I mentioned, there's no need for it now to negotiate curves of less than 3', but I'm not going to reinstate the nibbled bit off the cylinders. 



#21111 Tony Wright

Tony Wright

    Member


  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 3,671 posts

Posted Today, 21:34

Looking at the pictures of Edward Thompson on here ( I will refrain from commenting on the aesthetics of the loco!), I notice that the large cylinders are quite a bit outboard of the running plate. If this is to scale, were these beasts restricted as to where they could go as I could see some lineside impedimenta receiving terminal damage!

 

The cement train looks very clean. We had a Blue Circle Cement factory just north of Ipswich and all the wagons were absolutely covered in thick white powder as indeed was the adjacent station (Claydon), goods shed and signal box. The local houses also suffered from the fall out and there was great rejoicing when the plant closed.

 

Martin Long

The cylinders are fixed as designed, Martin. 

 

They do look a bit outboard, though they certainly don't foul LB's platforms. The big cylinders were built out to the loading gauge limit. 

 

60500 Sept '62 01.jpg

 

60500 Sept '62 02.jpg

 

Both these shots were taken in Sept 1962, by which time 60500 had a five-segment boiler, lipped chimney and disc wheels on its tender. Was I there at Retford, watching all this at the time? It's possible. The cylinders are certainly as wide as would be allowed. 

 

What's also of interest is the GE Section-allocated Mk.1 in this empty stock train - probably new or recently-refurbished (along with some of the other stock) at York. 

 

Please observe copyright restrictions.  

 

Any restriction on the Thompson Pacifics (or any LNER big stuff) was dependent on the line's RA rating. In earlier days, the first Pacifics clouted the edges of some platforms, until the bottom outside edges of the buffer beams were taken off in a curve. Both Thompson's and Peppercorn's Pacifics had shorter buffer beams, the footplate curving in at the front on the Thompson locos and being less-wide at the front on the Peppercorn ones. 


Edited by Tony Wright, Today, 21:35 .







Google Ads are only seen by non-members of RMweb - Create an RMweb account and you'll only receive modelling ads.