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#26 pete_mcfarlane

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Posted 21 March 2013 - 13:10

Proof that Iran has weapons of mass destruction.

 

http://www.phantasra...09 Teheranu.jpg

 

Cheers

David

I'm suprised they haven't stuck plywood wings on one, painted it black and claimed it's their latest stealth fighter.

 

Two LMS Jinties went to the NCC in Northern Ireland (which is overseas, but not abroad....) complete with regauged wheels. They were later painted lined black by the UTA - I think they were the only Jinties to be given lining. I also have a vague memory that some of the Dundalk Newry and Greenore 0-6-0Ts had originally started on the LNWR in England.





#27 kevinlms

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Posted 21 March 2013 - 13:35

The Victorian Railways F class diesel shunter should be very familiar.

http://en.wikipedia....02_DSC01872.JPG

 

Cheers

David

More here

 

http://www.victorian.../fdie/fdie.html

 

Technically more like a Class 11 (LMS design) since the Victorian locos had the 4ft wheels rather than the 4ft 6in of the 08/09.

 

http://users.tpg.com...l-v1-partA.pdf.

 

Page 10 for plan.



#28 DavidB-AU

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Posted 21 March 2013 - 13:59

More here
 
http://www.victorian.../fdie/fdie.html
 
Technically more like a Class 11 (LMS design) since the Victorian locos had the 4ft wheels rather than the 4ft 6in of the 08/09.
 
http://users.tpg.com...l-v1-partA.pdf.

Technically the closest is the Dutch 600 class.

http://en.wikipedia....ki/NS_Class_600

Cheers
David

Edited by DavidB-AU, 21 March 2013 - 14:00 .


#29 kevinlms

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Posted 21 March 2013 - 14:27

Built in Australia, but larger versions of the Class 20? The front is very similar.

 

http://www.hothamval...diesel_loco.htm


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#30 rannorgana

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Posted 22 March 2013 - 00:12

Lest we froget as well: Flying Scotsman, Coronation (Duchess of Hamilton Really, but let's gloss over that one), and King George V all went to America on special tours, and that Pendennis castle ended up in Australia.

 

GWR Dean Goods(?) 0-6-0s and GWR 2-6-0s both ended up in france in WW1, and a large number of the 0-6-0s went back in WW2.

 

I recall hearing the story of one engine (a Dean goods I think) that went to france in both WW1 & WW2, was captured by the germans in the latter, captured by the Russians from them used for a long time, repatriated and then shipped to China! It may even have been brought back by the preservation movement, I cant remember that far :)

 

Don't forget that Flying Scotsman has been down under too!

 

RODs ran in France, Egypt, Syria, Palestine, Lebanon and Iraq during WW1. After the war, some were sold to Australia and China.

 

LMS 8Fs went to Egypt, Iran, Italy and Palestine (later Israel). Some were later sold to Turkey and Iraq. A few also ended up at the bottom of the Atlantic.

 

WD Austerity 2-8-0s went to France and the Netherlands,. Some later went to Hong Kong, the Netherlands and Sweden.

 

Not forgetting that Kestrel went to Russia.

 

Cheers

David

 

http://farm4.static...._03895b48c6.jpg

 

http://farm4.static....46b7479.jpg?v=0

 

Here we go:

 

 

And some British built. C30 class tank (Beyer Peacock) and rebuilt C30 tank into a tender engine (Beyer Peacock/Everleigh Workshops).

 

 

Bit dodgy, as mentioned they were taken on my phone

 

EDIT: Pictures failed again, so I'll post them here later, although they are in my gallery:http://www.rmweb.co....way-and-museum/

 

There's an AD60 there too

 

If I remember correctly, 20 and 24 are at Dorrigo, and 23 is the one owned by the RVR. #20 is unique being the only surviving 8K/ROD built by North British. I have (low quality phone photos) somewhere that I'll dig out of the RODs at Dorrigo last year.

 

As well as the RODs, J&A Brown bought several other engines over from England, including 'The Major', a Mersy Railway 0-6-4T (currently down at the RTM), and various others which have just slipped my memory.

 

The RTM also has a 15"(?) Hunslet 0-6-0, and there are various clones around as well.

 

Even more reason to go and see them - shame you can only see them from outside the property.

 

Even better NZZA 800 is supposed to be at Dorrigo as well!



#31 edcayton

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Posted 22 March 2013 - 00:19

Lots of Wickham's products (made down the road from me in Ware) went all over the world. Many were tested on the Buntingford branch.

 

Ed



#32 Armchair Modeller

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Posted 22 March 2013 - 00:26

Fifty of the outside framed Midland 0-6-0s were sold for use in Italy before the first world war.

 

A Webb compound 2-2-2-0 was sold to the Pennsylvania Railway in the USA and one for France



#33 burgundy

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Posted 22 March 2013 - 00:28

Rather different from most of the examples that have been quoted so far, but the project on which I am currently working is one a batch of a dozen locos, of which four were subsequently sold to the Egyptian Government Railway. Dieppe.JPG

There are some other very early examples where Brighton locos were pensioned off to foreign railways (either gullible or desperate) and, in later years, some that were sold abroad but apparently for scrap.

More in keeping with the general theme of this thread, this one is an inmate of the museum at Ephesus.

P1010234.JPG  

Best wishes

Eric         


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#34 69843

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Posted 22 March 2013 - 00:47

Don't forget that Flying Scotsman has been down under too!

 

 

http://farm4.static...._03895b48c6.jpg

 

http://farm4.static....46b7479.jpg?v=0

 

 

There's an AD60 there too

 

 

Even more reason to go and see them - shame you can only see them from outside the property.

 

Even better NZZA 800 is supposed to be at Dorrigo as well!

 

Dont know if the two 8Fs on the SS Thistlegorm count, as this is about British outline locomotives OVERseas, not under them!

 

NZZA 800 is at Dorrigo, although I'm not sure whereabouts in the sidings. There is also a MetroVic 46 class electric (4602) and various other bits. I'll compile a list later.

 

I have a shot of 6039 in my gallery, as well as 6040 down at the RTM in a seperate gallery. 6029 is in Canberra, nearing the end of a rebuild to allow it to become operational. Heres a taster for anyone who is interested:


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#35 Pacific231G

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Posted 22 March 2013 - 01:24

In 1911 North British built 50 copies of the Highland Railway Castle class 4-6-0s for the French Etat railway to meet an urgent need for motive power. Apart from the addition of a Westinghouse pump these were virtually identical to the Highland Railway locos. However, though steam locos on French railways usually had a very long life, the Highland Castles were found to be underpowered and were soon relegated to works trains. When SNCF was created in 1938 only three of the class remained and they didn't last beyond 1941. 

 

By contrast the 270 2-8-0 consolidations that North British and a couple of other UK builders supplied to an existing Etat design five years later and then for the French government were extremely successful (apart from six that were lost at sea). As class 140C, they were the last SNCF steam locos in regular revenue service at the end of steam in 1975 and then became  the second most preserved class of French steam locos (after the post second world war North American built 141Rs) Ironically all of the eight survivors were built in Britain- seven by North British in Glasgow and one by Vulcan Foundry  in Lancashire.


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#36 EddieB

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Posted 22 March 2013 - 23:44

I don't think the enormity of this subject has even been scratched.  Taking steam alone (and excluding miniature gauges, self-propelled cranes etc), British factories built around 112,000 locomotives, of which some 40,000 were exported.  Most of these went to the outposts of Empire, but even mainland Europe (which wasn't without its own numerous locomotive builders) received around 8,000 locomotives  (most supplied directly, but others second-hand from British railway companies or the military, though this figure excludes locomotives loaned to the ROD/WD by the major companies and subsequently returned without being taken into the capital stock of foreign companies).  There were even a number of locomotives shipped across the Channel for various expos and exhibitions - I'm unaware of a definitive list having been compiled.

 

The history of second-hand locomotives goes right back to the days of the Stephensons.  There is some disagreement and conjecture around the locomotives (or parts of locomotives) first exported to France and whether the Stephenson, Marc Seguin or both subsequently came up with the invention of the multi-tubular boiler.  Of course, the sale of second-hand locomotives comes right up to the present day, with diesel classes 03, 08, 14, 20, 37, 56 and 58 and electrics 77, 86 and 87 either sold or hired abroad.

 

In between there are so many interesting examples.  Take a look at the locomotives of the Malines & Terneuzen Railway - a motley collection of second-hand Beyer Peacocks and Crewe builds, reflecting the LNWR, its predecessors and absorbed companies.  Or the British-owned Danube and Black Sea Railway - apparently the North London Railway minutes record the sale of an 0-6-0 in 1867, but the rest of its history is obscure (before and after the sale).  The LBSCR has been mentioned already - life-expired locomotives sold for scrap value and exported - did they ever see service in their new homes?  Or what about the four Vulcan Foundry 2-4-0s of 1866, which the Somerset & Dorset sold to Alsace-Lorraine in 1871?

 

Then we have engines built for the South Eastern Railway by George England, rejected by the SER and exported to Italy.  Or conversely, the Sharp Stewart 0-6-0s for the Ottoman Railway that ended up on the LTSR.


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#37 DavidB-AU

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Posted 23 March 2013 - 01:49

There is a difference between British-built and British outline. Take for example the South Australian Railways 500 class 4-8-2, distinctly American outline even though they were built by Armstrong-Whitworth.

 

Cheers

David


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#38 asmay2002

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Posted 23 March 2013 - 12:00

Built in Australia, but larger versions of the Class 20? The front is very similar.

 

http://www.hothamval...diesel_loco.htm

 

The EE house styling used on the C class accounts for the visual similarity to the 20 (that applies to most EE export designs) but mechanically they're closer to a 37.



#39 Allegheny1600

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Posted 23 March 2013 - 19:39

I don't think anyone has yet mentioned the WD 2-10-0's that ran (2 still run!) in Greece.

They were built by North British and are still recognisable even with some additions!

http://www.railfaneu...Lb964_Volos.jpg

Lb962 and Lb964 are the preserved locos.

Other familiar locos in Greece will be "USA tanks" and "S160's" although, of course they are not British built!

Cheers,

John E.


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#40 298

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Posted 23 March 2013 - 19:55

Phil, on 20 Mar 2013 - 23:16, said:
There were also movements of BR built kit to tradeshows in Europe. Anyone remember the entourage of classes 89,90,91 and 150/2 off to the show in Hamburg ?


Some interesting photos at: http://www.traintesting.com/IVA_88.htm

142049 went to Expo86 in Vancouver, but it didn't lead to any export sales as a RDC replacement. Also of that era were trips involving early prototype railcars to the USA and Thailand, again without any firm orders but it did pave the way for a later order of class 158 clones to Thailand.

Edited by 298, 23 March 2013 - 19:55 .


#41 69843

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Posted 24 March 2013 - 13:26

O.K., whilst searching around for something entirely different, I stumbled across this proposed Tasmanian locomotive that bears more than a passing resemblance to a Class 20, and I believe was to use EE running gear: http://recordsearch....ne.asp?B=975613



#42 Armchair Modeller

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Posted 24 March 2013 - 13:32

Two Wickham DMUs were sold secondhand from BR to Trinidad



#43 AMJ

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Posted 24 March 2013 - 15:11

Some of the PKP electric locos had similar bodies as the 81's

 

Many Austerity 0-6-0ST's ran in Europe with quite a few serving with NSB, SNCB, SNCF and various industrial concerns.

 

How about the EE class 50 copies sent to Portugal with Iberian gauge.

 

Sentinel exported many of it's shunters to different corners of the world. 

 

A fair number of standard designed locos from the various Leeds locomotive works were exported into every country with rail lines.



#44 cornelius

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Posted 24 March 2013 - 15:26

2' gauge Lynton & Barnstaple "Lew" ended up in Brazil. 


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#45 EddieB

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Posted 25 March 2013 - 20:03

O.K., whilst searching around for something entirely different, I stumbled across this proposed Tasmanian locomotive that bears more than a passing resemblance to a Class 20, and I believe was to use EE running gear: http://recordsearch....ne.asp?B=975613

Probably the Tasmanian X class http://en.wikipedia....iki/TGR_X_class - "the engines were usually driven with the cab-end leading. The cab was broad and flat, and made the class very odd-looking, with some commenting that they looked more like bricks than locomotives".  There's some newreel footage of one being taken on a low loader for display at the Festival of Britain.

 

The New Zealand De class and Midland/Western Australian Government Railway F and G classes also bear a resemblance to the class 20 body shape.

 

Some of the PKP electric locos had similar bodies as the 81's

Those were the twenty PKP EU06, of which the nearest BR equivalent were the AL3 (class 83). The first 3kV dc electric locomotives in Poland were EL.101/2 built by Metropolitan Vickers in 1936, although these appear not to have been based on a British prototype.



#46 Petri Sallinen

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Posted 25 March 2013 - 20:35

We had UK made steam locomotives for five feet gauge here in Finland made by Avonside Engine Co (Bristol); Beyer, Peacock & Co, Gorton Foundry (Manchester); Peto, Brassey & Betts, Canada Works (Birkenhead); Dübs & Co, Glasgow Locomotive Works (Glasgow) and Neilson & Co, Springburn Works (Glasgow). These might be export models - I do not know (maybe someone knows here better than I). We also had UK made narrow gauge locos for example made by Bagnall.

Petri
Helsinki, Finland
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#47 RosiesBoss

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Posted 26 March 2013 - 04:42

British Designed Locos Used in NSW

 

As others have noted, Great Britain exported thousands of locomotives, especially within the Empire/Commonwealth. This paper presents a very brief overview of just part of the obvious British connection in either origin or design for locos that operated in NSW. Similar stories could be written for locos that operated in other states.

 

I have been interested in (and modelled) both NSWGR locos and British designs (particularly the GWR) for many years. I have partly illustrated this paper with images from my own collection.

 

In Australia, there was a government policy to purchase either locally or from within the Empire. Products manufactured in the USA attracted a financial penalty. Therefore, for much of the 19th century, British locomotive designs dominated the various Australian state railways. (This policy persisted well into the 20th century, resulting in the purchase by the NSWGR of some Alco 40-class diesel electric locos assembled in Canada to avoid the penalty charges.) Nevertheless, some American-designed locos were purchased, chiefly from Baldwin, but these were not as successful as the British designs of the time.

 

In NSW, Beyer Peacock provided many of the staple designs.

 

From the late 19th century, US practice and local design expertise resulted in the adoption of locally developed designs which blended the best of both British and US practice. In NSW, this led to the introduction of the C32, C34, D50, D53, D55, D57, D58, C36, C38 and AD60 designs. Many of these were built locally, supplemented by batches made by Beyer Peacock (UK) and Baldwin (USA).

 

However, the NSWGR began with purely British designs, as their initial consulting engineer was James McConnell of the LNWR. Several later senior engineers came from the GWR, bringing with them the use of Churchward-inspired taper boilers and GWR workshop practice.

 

 

1. NSW Government Railways

 

1 Class:

These 0-4-2 locos were built by Robert Stephenson & Co to the designs of James McConnell of the LNWR, consulting engineer to the NSWGR. They were adapted from his 1854 design of Wolverton express goods 0-6-0 locos for the LNWR.

01, No 1, Powerhouse Museum, 2 Aug 82.JPG

 

6-Class:

These little 2-2-2s were built by  William Fairbairn & Sons and were, in essence, a small-wheeled version of LNWR “Problem” class. They entered service in 1857.

02, No.7 at Haslem's Creek Cemetery Station c1865.jpg

 

13 class:

 

This group of 2-4-0s were built by Manning Wardle & Co, to the general design of a LNWR Crewe Goods and entered service in 1863.

http://commons.wikim...2901449950).jpg

 

S(29) & 9N:

This group of small box 0-6-0 saddle-tank locos was built by Manning Wardle & Co and entered service in 1863. “Pioneer” was used as a contractor’s engine, later entering service as 9N. The design seems to be a standard Manning Wardle one, with a UK example having operated on the Hook Norton Ironstone Partnership, which was absorbed into the GWR. It became  GWR 1337. This image of Pioneer, later NSWGR 9N, came with the following information: “Pioneer, 1860s - Driver - Thomas Newport; Fireman - unknown; On footplate - William Sixsmith -- Loco imported to NSW by Sixsmith & Newport”

03, Pioneer, 1860s - Driver - Thomas Newport; Fireman - unknown; On footplate - William Sixmith -- Loco imported to NSW by Sixsmith & Newport.jpg

 

G(23)/Cg(23):

In the 1860s, John Fowler was consulting engineer to the NSWGR and, when asked to recommend a design of new express engines, proposed a version of his designs for the Metropolitan Railway and the Isle of Man Railway. They were built by Beyer Peacock & Co and entered service in 1865. They were later converted from 2-4-0s to 4-4-0s by the substitution of a Bissel truck. Related UK locos were the Metropolitan Railway 4-4-0T and Cambrian Railway 4-4-0 No.13.

http://investigator.... Z14)&B1=Search

 

T(14):

When fast, light passenger engines were needed in the 1860s, a “Jenny Lind” 2-2-2 design was commissioned from Beyer Peacock & Co. They were introduced in 1862. A similar UK design ran on the West Midland Railway, eg No 100 (later GWR 245). In NSW, John Heron (known as “the big fish”) regularly drove No.15 on the express train from Penrith to Sydney which became known as “The Fish”, in recognition of its regular driver.

http://www.mosi.org....irn=30796&row=4

 

E17:

When powerful goods engines were needed to haul trains over the Great Zig-Zag (west of Sydney), a class of Stephenson “long boiler” 0-6-0s was commissioned from Robert Stephenson & Co, entering service in 1865. They resembled West Cornwall Railway “St Just”, later GWR 1385. Here is the last survivor, as restored to original condition.

04, E 18, Royal Easter Show, Moore Park, Apr 88.jpg

 

N(67):

When new suburban passenger engines were needed in the 1870s, the NSWGR acquired the working drawings of Stroudley’s famous “Terrier” locos on the LBSCR. They were built locally by Mort & Co and were introduced in 1875.

http://www.flickr.co...nsw/6474986565/

 

C(79)/Z12:

When further passenger engines were need in the 1870s, an improved version of the G(23) class was ordered from Beyer Peacock & Co, entering service in 1877. These were 4-4-0s, having a Bissel truck instead of a single leading axle. These also are related to the Metropolitan Railway 4-4-0T and Cambrian Railway 4-4-0 No.13.

05, 1210, Central, 25 Sep 05.jpg

 

A(93)/Z19:

In the mid 1870s, with increasing goods traffic, an improved “long boiler” 0-6-0 design was ordered from Beyer Peacock & Co. These locos lasted from their introduction in 1877 to the end of steam in the 1970s. Here’s a link to an “as built” image:

http://emu.msim.org....a.php?irn=12942

 

This is how they looked at the end of their long careers:

06, 1904, Dorrigo, 11 Aug 89.jpg

 

Crane locomotive

Most NSWGR workshops employed one or more small crane tank locomotives. This example was built by Dubs & Co and entered service in 1879. A similar example from 1901 is at the Foxfield Railway.

http://www.australia...am.com/1034.htm

 

Q(158):

In the late 1870s, much suburban passenger traffic was being handled by unsuitable old locos. This class was built by Beyer Peacock & Co, using a design similar to that used for some IoWR 2-4-0Ts. Here are some images – when new and in service:

http://emu.msim.org....a.php?irn=13191

 

http://investigator....Q158)&B1=Search

 

B(205)/Z25:

Because of ever-increasing goods traffic, a batch of 2-6-0s was ordered from Beyer Peacock & Co, entering service in 1882. These seem to have been built to a fairly standard design also used for MSWJR Nos 14 & 16 (later GWR 24).

07, 2510, Macdonaldtown, 1982.jpg

 

D(255)/Z15 Class:

These typically English inside-cylinder 4-4-0s were built by Beyer Peacock & Co, entering service in 1882. Here’s a link to BP’s photo:

http://emu.msim.org....a.php?irn=12883

 

D(261)/Z16 Class:

Dubs & Co built variants to the BP design, which began service in 1883.

http://www.flickr.co...uon/7731142862/

http://www.flickr.co.../in/photostream

 

F(351)/X10:

Built to a design used also for the Isle of Wight Railway in 1864, these engines were constructed by Beyer Peacock & Co and entered service in 1885. They also resemble Barry Railway C class (eg GWR 1322).

08, 1042, Maitland, 13 Jan 95.jpg

 

H(373)/Z17:

These express engines were built by Vulcan Foundry and entered service in 1887. Their styling is similar to the Adams 4-4-0 of LSWR (eg No 563 in NRM).

09, 1709, Central, 25 Sep 05.jpg

 

B(55)/Z24:

When further 2-6-0 goods engines similar to the B(205) class were needed, the order was won by Dubs & Co. They entered service in 1891. Like the B(205)s, they are very similar to MSWJR Nos 14 & 16 (later GWR 24).

10, 2413 as ECNSW No 6, Botany Exchange Sidings, 25 Aug 67 b - note Z19 class tender.jpg

 

M(40)/Z11:

From 1891, a small class of Beyer Peacock 4-4-2Ts began hauling passenger trains around suburban Sydney. They were generally similar to the Taff Vale Railway C class.

 

http://investigator.... Z11)&B1=Search

 

P(6)/C32:

In 1892, one of the most useful passenger locos ever used by the NSWGR began service and examples remained in front-line use until the 1970s. They were designed by the NSWGR in consultation with Beyer Peacock & Co and the first batch was made by them in Manchester, just across the road from the works which delivered the very similar Highland Railway Jones Goods in 1894.

11, 3265, Central, 1967.jpg

 

CC(79)/Z13:

In the late 1890s, due to a shortage of suburban tank engines and the availability of C(79) class 4-4-0s displaced by new P(6) locos, some of the 4-4-0s were converted to tank engines, reinforcing the ancestral Metropolitan Railway tank engine looks of the class. They began service in 1896.

12, 1307, Yass, 10 Aug 11.JPG

 

NN(1027)/C35:

As passenger trains became heavier in the early 20th century, it became necessary to design and introduce more powerful locomotives. The then CME was E.E.Lucy, who had served under G.J.Churchward in the GWR. His design appears to be closely related to Churchward’s “Saint” class, but with smaller wheels better suited to the steep grades in NSW. They entered service in 1914. The locos were subsequently rebuilt with stronger frames, larger cabs and valences along the footplate, losing their GWR look.

 

Original condition:

http://en.wikipedia....ves_express.jpg

 

As rebuilt:

13, Mittagong Centenary Tour, 4 Mar 67 - 3526 backing onto train, Central.jpg

 

F(1212)/X10:

These little engines, originally built by Manning Wardle for the NSW Public Works Department, entered service with the NSWGR in 1917. They saw many years’ service, mainly around loco depots and workshops. They were a typical British industrial tank engine.

14, NSWRTM Enfield 2nd Extravaganza, 27 Apr 74 - 1021 Cardiff.JPG

 

C36:

In the 1920s, further powerful 4-6-0s were needed, so the NSWGR designed an improved version of the C35 class, with Walschaert’s valve gear and larger capacity tenders. As reboilered with units built by North British Locomotive Company in the 1950s, they bear a remarkable resemblance to LMS Class 5 4-6-0s.

15, 3651, Goulburn depot turntable, 3 Sep 69.JPG

 

2. Private Railways

 

Mersey Tank:

When the Mersey Railway was electrified in 1904, its steam locos were disposed for further use elsewhere. Four were purchased for use on the Richmond Vale Railway, which served collieries in the Newcastle (NSW) coalfield. They entered service in 1907.

16, 5, ex RVR, Broadmeadow, Nov 74.JPG

 

ROD:

The Richmond Vale Railway also bought 13 ex-ROD 2-8-0s in the 1920s, the first three entering service in 1924. Some of these had not only worked for the British Army, but also for the GWR and GCR.

17, ROD 24, RVR, Hexham,17 Dec 72.jpg

 

Hunslet 4-6-0T:

After the end of the Great War, several narrow gauge Hunslet 4-6-0s that had operated on the Western Front were refurbished for sale and at least one came out to Queensland to work at the Gin Gin Sugar Mill. This loco is now on display at the Australian War Memorial, Canberra.

 

http://www.awm.gov.a...ction/REL29508/

18, Hunslet 4-6-0T, AWM, Canberra, 24 May 08.jpg

 

Hebburn Ltd (colliery) 2-6-2T No.1

Hebburn Colliery, on the Newcastle (NSW) coalfields, operated its own small fleet of locos. In 1955 it took delivery of a brand new 2-6-2 tank engine, built by Robert Stephenson & Co. to the drawings used for Alexander Docks Nos 36 & 37 (GWR 1205 & 1206). As it entered service, the last of its “brothers” was being cut up for scrap!

http://www.flickr.co...cd2/5150575729/

 

3. Visitors

 

GWR 4079 Pendennis Castle

In 1977, GWR 4079 “Pendennis Castle” visited NSW briefly. She was landed in Darling Harbour (Sydney, NSW) and towed to Eveleigh Carriage Works where she was stored inside a purpose-built cage. A few months later, she proceeded in “light steam” behind a NSWGR diesel loco to Newcastle, where she was loaded onto the ship that took her to the Hammersley Iron Railway in Western Australia.

19, 4079 Pendennis Castle delivery to Carriage Wks Eveleigh, 15 Jul 77 ji - 4079 & X201 Eveleigh shunting, Elstons.JPG

 

LNER 4472 “Flying Scotsman”

In 1988, LNER 4472 “Flying Scotsman” toured Australia as part of the Bicentennial celebrations. She visited many capital cities and starred in several tour trains.

20, LNER 4472 Flying Scotsman, en route to melbourne, Moss Vale, 19 Oct 88 a.jpg

 

References:

  1. RCTS: “The Locomotives of the Great Western Railway”, Parts 3, 4 & 10.
  2. Leon Oberg: “Locomotives of Australia” (A.H. & A.W.Reed, 1975) – ISBN 0 589 07173 4
  3. Alex Grunbach: “A Compendium of NSW Steam Locomotives (ARHS, 1989) – ISBN 0 909650 27 6
  4. C.J.Bowen-Cooke: “British Locomotives” (Gresham Books reprint of 1893 original) – ISBN 0 905418 72 7
  5. J.E.Kite: “Vintage Steam” (Ian Allan, 1969) – SBN 4110 0117 0
  6. R.G.Preston: ”Tender Into Tank” (ARHS,1970)
  7. http://www.australia.../nswgrframe.htm
  8. Gifford H.Eardley: “Locomotives Beyond Recall”(NSWRTM, 1976) – ISBN 0 909862 08 7

Edited by RosiesBoss, 26 March 2013 - 04:55 .

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#48 EddieB

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Posted 26 March 2013 - 09:58

We had UK made steam locomotives for five feet gauge here in Finland made by Avonside Engine Co (Bristol); Beyer, Peacock & Co, Gorton Foundry (Manchester); Peto, Brassey & Betts, Canada Works (Birkenhead); Dübs & Co, Glasgow Locomotive Works (Glasgow) and Neilson & Co, Springburn Works (Glasgow). These might be export models - I do not know (maybe someone knows here better than I). We also had UK made narrow gauge locos for example made by Bagnall.

Petri
Helsinki, Finland

All of these builders supplied extensively overseas and in almost every case I think the locomotives supplied to Finland were export models:

 

A1 4-4-0 Canada Works

A2 4-4-0 Canada Works

A3 4-4-0 Dübs

B1 0-4-2T Beyer Peacock

B2 0-4-2T Beyer Peacock

C1 0-6-0 Neilson

C2 0-6-0 Avonside

Sk1 2-6-0 Dübs

Sk3 2-6-0 Dübs

 

As an example, the BP 0-4-2Ts (classes B1 and B2, BP designation 2258)  appear to have been a custom design, albeit originally supplied to various constituent companies that became VR.

 

In addition, there was a failed order for 20 or 25 2-8-2s to be built to Finnish design (class Tv3) by Vulcan Foundry, for delivery in 1952.

 

I haven't been able to find photographs of the Bagnall n.g. locos, but as these were essentially contractors' locomotives, expect these to have been of fairly standard design. 



#49 69843

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Posted 26 March 2013 - 10:03

Well, I just learnt some history even I didn't know about the local NSWGR...very impressive RosiesBoss.

 

That being said, one major ommission was the (G)1204/Z27 class engines. Built in 1913 by the Hunslet Engine Company, these were originally New South Wales Public Works Department locomotives number PWD 1-8. in 1917, they were transferred to the NSWGR when they took over railway construction. Viewed to be too new to be used on works trains, they were numbered (G)1204-1211. At some point (I believe around 1920-22) they were given new boilers, changing the original outline of the class to that seen today. In 1924, they were renumbered to the Z27 class (2701-2708).

 

The first two were withdrawn in 1957, with the rest being withdrawn in 1963. 2705 was preserved by the New South Wales Rail Transportation Museum, and was operational up until 1975. After a restoration in 1995, it was returned to steam (in a incorrect livery of Passenger Green). After a light overhaul and repaint, it was used by Cadburys in 2012 for an ad campaign (there is still small bits of purple in the cab if you know where to look...). After which Cadbury funded a repaint into gloss black with yellow painted cabside numbers. The engine does occasionally make trips out on the mainline, but is much more at home on the Thirlmere to Buxton 'loop' trains.

 

Happily, there is a tour plan in motion to celebrate the grand lady's 100th birthday later this year on the mainline.

 

(edit added ad and a picture I took at th beginning of the month)

http://www.rmweb.co....ttach_id=255219


Edited by 69843, 26 March 2013 - 10:04 .

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#50 EddieB

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Posted 26 March 2013 - 10:31

Well, I just learnt some history even I didn't know about the local NSWGR...very impressive RosiesBoss.

Yes, indeed.

 

But why draw the line at steam?  Let's not forget the 40-strong MetroVick/BP class 46 Bo-Bo electrics, or the ten class 41 Bo-Bo diesel-electrics built by Metro-Cammell/BTH.


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