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British outline locos overseas




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#51 69843

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Posted 26 March 2013 - 10:48

Yes, indeed.

 

But why draw the line at steam?  Let's not forget the 40-strong MetroVick/BP class 46 Bo-Bo electrics, or the ten class 41 Bo-Bo diesel-electrics built by Metro-Cammell/BTH.

or not the least diesel 4102, which is 60 this year, and is a BTH product (I believe...)



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#52 Petri Sallinen

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Posted 26 March 2013 - 10:53

I haven't been able to find photographs of the Bagnall n.g. locos, but as these were essentially contractors' locomotives, expect these to have been of fairly standard design. 

 

We had three Bagnalls (1512/1897, 1538/1898 and 1539/1898) in Finland. This picture shows one in Kallavesi in 1898.

bagnallscreen.jpg

 

Here is the other one in Harviala. You are also able to see Finnish made (=Tampella) locomotives in left and right handside.

bagnallscreen1.jpg

 

All three locos are here in Punkaharju in 1905.

bagnallscreen3.jpg

 

 

We also had one Hudswell Clarke 0-6-0Wt 1318/1919.

 

 

Petri

Helsinki, Finland


Edited by Petri Sallinen, 26 March 2013 - 11:00 .

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#53 EddieB

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Posted 26 March 2013 - 10:56

Great photos, Petri.

 

I understand there was another Bagnall sent to Finland.  Bagnall 1515/1898, a 600mm gauge 0-4-0ST supplied to Carlos Yensen (contractors) for Finnish State Railway construction.



#54 EddieB

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Posted 26 March 2013 - 11:01

or not the least diesel 4102, which is 60 this year, and is a BTH product (I believe...)

Yes, it's classed as a BTH product (BTH 1002/1953), despite bodywork by Metro-Cammell* and a 400hp Davey-Paxman 12RPHL engine.  BTH supplied the electrical and control equipent.

 

*Which might explain why the NSWGR class 41 were rather less ugly than the WAGR Y class subsequently supplied by BTH.


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#55 RosiesBoss

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Posted 26 March 2013 - 11:14

G'day, all,

 

Thank you, EddieB, for reminding me about the Z27s. I deliberately left them out, as they were bought by the Public Works Dept and I am not aware of any similar class of 2-6-0 with Walscheart's valve gear operating in the UK.

 

If you include non-steam designs, don't forget the XPTs.

 

When I was seconded to the Mechanical Branch Design office to help prepare maintenance instructions for them, I learned how similar and how different they were from British HSTs. They are close cousins, but not brothers. It was an exciting time - especially when they set a new Southern Hemisphere rail speed record.

 

The adaptation of the British HST design to NSW conditions was one of the great achievements of the (now disbanded) Mechanical Branch Testing Laboratories and Design Office.

 

Regards,

 

Rob



#56 Petri Sallinen

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Posted 26 March 2013 - 11:37

I understand there was another Bagnall sent to Finland.  Bagnall 1515/1898, a 600mm gauge 0-4-0ST supplied to Carlos Yensen (contractors) for Finnish State Railway construction.

 

Please let me know more about this loco (I do not know this loco). The Bagnalls of Stafford book tells that 1515/1898 supplied to Carlos Yensen to Spain (not in Finland).

 

Petri



#57 EddieB

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Posted 26 March 2013 - 13:16

Please let me know more about this loco (I do not know this loco). The Bagnalls of Stafford book tells that 1515/1898 supplied to Carlos Yensen to Spain (not in Finland).

 

Petri

Good point.  Checking back, it's clear that the loco was supplied to Carlos Yensen (which sounds a mixture of Spanish and Scandinavian!) and identified as "OCEJA no. 1".  You're right that Baker and Allen Civil have it as being sent to Spain in the list given in their monumental "Bagnalls of Stafford"; however the same authors in an earlier list ("Bagnalls of Stafford Locomotive Works List") published via the Industrial Locomotive Society have the destination as Finland.  So you pays your money and takes your choice.

 

Given that the book succeeds the list, I'm inclined to agree that the locomotive probably went to Spain instead of Finland.



#58 EddieB

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Posted 26 March 2013 - 13:18

If you include non-steam designs, don't forget the XPTs.

Probably because - despite BR numbering - I tend to regard them as multiple units rather than locomotives!  But given that multiple units appear within the scope of this thread, well yes, they shouldn't be overlooked!



#59 Petri Sallinen

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Posted 26 March 2013 - 13:23

Some UK made locomotives in Finland.

 

Petri

 

A1 4-4-0 Canada Works

86041448.jpg

 

A2 4-4-0 Canada Works

35587801.gif

 

A3 4-4-0 Dübs

19352466.jpg

 

B1 0-4-2T Beyer Peacock

60181962.jpg

 

B2 0-4-2T Beyer Peacock

54065578.jpg

 

C1 0-6-0 Neilson

33795608.jpg

 

C2 0-6-0 Avonside

83981564.gif


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#60 69843

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Posted 26 March 2013 - 13:55

G'day, all,

 

Thank you, EddieB, for reminding me about the Z27s. I deliberately left them out, as they were bought by the Public Works Dept and I am not aware of any similar class of 2-6-0 with Walscheart's valve gear operating in the UK.

 

If you include non-steam designs, don't forget the XPTs.

Oi! I resent being called names!

 

Although I can't find a shot of one, the Z27s apparently had a distinctive British outline (like most older NSWGR stock) when they still had the original boilers fitted to them. However, I also can't think of any similar looking 2-6-0s off the top of my head. Anyone?

 

As to the XPTs, they are truly a masterstroke of engeneering to local conditions. They might only be good for 160kp/h, but they wern't designed for high speed travel as much as the HST, more to replace older, locomotive hauled trains between citys such as Sydney and Melbourne, whilst coping with the harsher Australian climate.


Edited by 69843, 26 March 2013 - 23:12 .


#61 RosiesBoss

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Posted 01 April 2013 - 04:49

Other British-built Locomotives, DMUs and EMUs Used in NSW

 

As noted by others, many classes of self-propelled units were built in the UK for export.

 

This paper supplements my earlier blog, so as to include designs that may not have had a closely similar design operating in Britain. It does not pretend to be a comprehensive list of all such locos imported into NSW, but just a taste of a once great export industry.

 

More detailed information, including locos from other states, may be found at:

http://www.australia...m.com/index.htm

 

1. NSW Government Railways

 

R(285)/Z18 Class 0-6-0T

 

In 1882, Vulcan Foundry delivered six domeless 0-6-0 suburban tank engines. Outclassed by later locos, these engines found further use around loco depots and yards and were reboilered with domed boilers. Some were sold for use in private collieries, such as at Catherine Hill Bay. 1076 saw out its days as a washout loco at Eveleigh Railway Workshops.

24, 1076, Evelegh Workshops, 19 Apr 68.JPG

 

L(436)/Z22 Class

 

These 2-6-0 passenger locos were ordered from Dubs & Co as near-equivalent engines to the Baldwin L(334) class. Delivered with domeless boilers, they later received domed boilers. They were known as “Scotch Yankees”. The last one was scrapped about 1937.

 

http://www.flickr.co...uon/8177631918/

 

20a, Builder's Plate from L440 - 2205.JPG

 

Breakdown Cranes

 

Like most railways, the NSWGR used numerous steam breakdown cranes, many of which were eventually converted to diesel power. Most of them were built in Britain.

 

Here are two examples.

 

30 ton accident crane 1048 (Cowans Sheldon 2012/1908), still in service at Goulburn Loco Depot in 1971:

21, 1048 builders plate, Goulburn, 4 Sep 71 - Cowans Sheldon 3012 of 1908.JPG

22, 1048, Goulburn, 4 Sep 71 - Cowans Sheldon 3012 of 1908.JPG

 

70 ton brakedown crane 1073 (Craven Brothers, 1929) seen here after being converted to diesel power and in use at Broadmeadow Locomotive Depot in 1988.

23, 1073 replacing engine cover on 8115, Broadmeadow, May 88 d.jpg

 

Hawthorn Leslie Luffing Cranes

 

From 1914 until 1950, the NSWGR purchased several batches of 0-4-0T locos equipped with “luffing cranes”, so-named because loads were lifted through the movement of the jib. Precision movement to both rotate and lift/lower the jib was achieved with a couple of small donkey engines. Some were also equipped with a turbogenerator for the electromagnet used to lift scrap iron. These little machines worked in such workshops as Eveleigh, Clyde and Cardiff and remained in service until the early 1980s.

 

Builder’s plate from 1051:

25a, Builder's Plate from 1051.JPG

 

1082, hard at work at Eveleigh Locomotive Workshops foundry in 1981:

25, 1082, Eveleigh Loco Wks Foundry, 25 Sep 81 .jpg

 

I(17)/Z26 Class

 

In 1892, Dubs & Co delivered this 20-strong class of 2-6-2 mineral saddle tanks. Many components (eg boiler, wheels, valve gear, wheels) were interchangeable with B(55) class 2-6-0s. They worked as bankers, coal haulers and shunters. Water capacity limited their use on main lines.

27a, 2604, Bathurst, 12 Dec 69, Dubs & Co. 2793 of 1891.jpg

 

G(1204)/Z27 class

 

These locos were ordered from the Hunslet Engine Co by the NSW Public Works Department for use in the construction of new railway lines. When that task was handed over to the NSWGR, the locos were transferred also, being used on branch lines alongside Z24 and Z25 classes. The Z27s differed from the other 2-6-0s in having Walschaert’s valve gear. They were eventually fitted with boilers standard across all three classes.

26, Mittagong Centenary Tour, 4 Mar 67 - 2705 backing onto train at Picton.jpg

 

T(524)/D50 class

 

In 1896, Beyer Peacock delivered the first of many 2-8-0s to the design of William Thow. Beginning as saturated engines, most were eventually superheated. 280 locos were eventually built, not just by BP, but also by Dubs & Co, Neilson & Co, North British Locomotive Company and Clyde Engineering (NSW). Some remained hauling coal until the end of steam haulage in the early 1970s. During the Great War, a batch of 10 under construction at North British were taken over by the British War Office and operated by the ROD. After the war, they were taken over by the Belgo-Nord Railway and worked coal trains in the Meusse Valley.

 

The NSWGR Chief Mechanical Engineer’s Library, which was located within the Mechanical Branch Laboratory complex at Redfern, held a copy of C.H.Lake “The World’s Locomotives” (Percival Marshall, 1906). On pages168-9 is a feature on Churchward’s GWR 28XX class 2-8-0. In the margin of their copy is a handwritten note signed by (ex-GWR) E.E.Lucy, Thow’s successor: “W.Thow esq. Your T class”. (The 28XX main dimensions are very similar to the T class which had entered service about ten years earlier.)

 

The T class was further developed locally by Lucy into the TF and K classes, all of which were built in NSW (see below), but which still display their British heritage.

 

Here is a couple of images of 5069, which remained largely unaltered from delivery to retirement – still hauling coal in the Hunter Valley.

29, 5069 sat, East Greta, 18 Aug 71.JPG

30, 5069 sat, Islington, 18 Aug 71 a.JPG

 

5139, seen here shunting at Lithgow, displays a superheated boiler, turbogenerator, electric lights and high capacity turret tender.

31, 5139, Lithgow yard, 19 Aug 70 c.JPG

 

S(636)/C30 class

 

William Thow’s third brilliant standard design for the NSWGR was this 4-6-4 tank loco. The first batch was delivered by Beyer Peacock in 1903. Further engines were supplied by BP and also from the NSWGR’s Eveleigh Workshops. The design was so significant that it featured on pages 194 and 195 of “The World’s Locomotives” (op. cit.).

 

These locos continued in suburban passenger train service until the late 1960s and some were still active as shunters in Sydney Yard into the 1970s. Here is an image of 3046 at work on those duties on Christmas Eve, 1970.

27, 3046, Central, 24 Dec 70.jpg

 

C30T class

 

Sydney’s suburban passenger network was progressively electrified from 1926, making many of the C30s redundant. At the time, many obsolete old locos (especially a strange assortment of Baldwin types and the L classes described above) were still serving on light country branch lines. The opportunity was taken to convert some of the tank engines to tender locos, which retained their old numbers, but with a “T” suffix (for tender). The work was done at both Clyde Engineering (NSW) and at Eveleigh Workshops. Older tenders from scrapped locos or from others that had been re-equipped with larger capacity ones were fitted to them. They continued to serve well in their new duties until the early 1970s.

 

Here is an image of 3028T on a special train on the NSW South Coast in early 1971:

28, 3028T RTM Sth Coast tour 6 Feb 71 - 4, near Dapto.JPG

 

TF(939)/D53 class

 

William Thow’s designs (P, T and S) had all passed through the “teething trouble” stage and were all working very well by the time he retired in 1911. He was succeeded by E.E. Lucy, who had been Assistant CME from 1906. Lucy had come from the GWR and was the uncle of Harold Holcroft – the inventor of the so-called Gresley conjugated valve gear – who had worked under him when Lucy was managing the GWR’s Wolverhampton Works.

 

When it became necessary to build further 2-8-0s (similar to the T class), Lucy modified the design to include a domed version of the GWR taper boiler, together with a few other changes, including superheating. They were introduced in 1912.

 

Some of these “improvements” to Thow’s design did not meet expectations, resulting in ultimate replacement of the tapered boiler with a parallel Belpaire boiler standard across T, TF and K class 2-8-0s, as well as reversion to flangeless 2nd and 3rd driving wheels.

 

All 190 locos were built locally. Examples remained in coal haulage until scrapped in the early 1970s.

 

Here are three images of late survivors at work on the Newcastle (NSW) coalfields:

34, 5482, Hexham, 18 Aug 71.JPG

 

32, 5486, entering Pt Waratah with non-air hoppers, 18 Aug 71.JPG

 

33, 5408 Dubbo, Hexham, 17 Dec 72.jpg

 

K(1353)/D55 Class

 

For completeness, I include some information about the K class 2-8-0s. These 120 locos, a further development of the T and TF 2-8-0s, abandoned their Allan straight link motion in favour of US Southern valve gear. Introduced in 1918, the last one was retired in July 1967.

 

Here is an image of 5597, taken during one of her last runs to Newcastle (NSW) before withdrawal:

34a, 5597s last run on short north, 23 Jul 67.JPG

 

AD60 class

 

These locos were ordered from Beyer Peacock just before a decision was made to change from steam to diesel traction. The original order of 50 was amended to 42 complete units, plus parts of another 5 as spares. They entered service in 1952 and the last was withdrawn in February 1973. They were the world’s largest (but not the most powerful) garratts.

 

Originally intended for use on lightly laid branch lines, they were soon displaced from these duties by new 48 class diesel electrics. Many were then modified to have increased axle loading on the driving wheels and therefore a higher tractive effort. They then saw many years’ work on main lines, hauling heavy mineral trains, some of which required double heading. The sight, smell, sound and feel of such workings – once experienced – is never to be forgotten, especially on such challenging places as the 1 in 42 hills known as Hawkmount or Fassifern Bank. Long before the train became visible, the noise of the twin engine units stammering into and out of synchronisation could be clearly heard. The volcanic exhaust would then be seen, going hundreds of feet into the air. As the engines came near, the earth would shake and the roar would be almost painfully loud. As they passed, cinders would rain down and would seem to do so for a minute or two after they had moved on. The locos would remain audible for about another ten minutes, while we shook the cinders from our hair and clothes.

 

Such work produced spectacular images, such as these:

35, 6042 & 6037, Newstan Colliery, 15 Dec 72 b.jpg

 

36, Double garratt tour 24 Sep 72 - 12 - 6029 & 6042, Hawkmount d.jpg

 

41 class

 

This class of ten bo-bo diesel electric locos was one of several small classes purchased to evaluate diesel traction in the early 1950s. (The remainder were US designs.) These locos were plagued with problems, resulting in no more UK diesel purchases until the advent of the XPTs. The design was from BTH, the engines from Paxman and the bodies from Metro-Cammel. They began service in 1953 and the last was retired in 1975.

 

Here is a step-plate of one of the locos.

37a, Top step plate from 41 class loco.JPG

 

The last survivor is 4102, shown here near 3137 at the NSW Rail Transport Museum, Thirlmere:

37, 4102, NSWRTM.JPG

 

46 Class

 

In 1956, the first of forty 46-class Co+Co electric locomotives began service on the NSWGR’s main western line across the Blue Mountains, west of Sydney. These 3400 hp units soon displaced steam traction on this route – and others, as electrification spread north and south of Sydney. They remained in front-line service until freight services were privatised in the early 1990s and the private operators found that the charges levied by Railcorp for use of the overhead electric wires were uneconomic compared with diesel traction.

 

The locos were built by Metropolitan Vickers and Beyer Peacock & Co.

 

Here is the builder’s plate from 4601:

38, 4601 builders plate, DELEC Enfield, 1983.JPG

 

Here is an image of triple-headed 46 class locos hauling a heavy goods train through Flemington (NSW) in 1991. The middle loco is still in largely original colours. The first and third locos are in the SRA’s “candy” colour scheme then in vogue.

39, 4636, 46 class & 4638, Flemington, 22 Mar 1991.JPG

 

SD EMU (“Red Rattlers”)

 

Sydney’s suburban rail network was progressively electrified from 1926. Some timber-bodied cars were built locally for this new service and 50 all-steel coaches were ordered from Leeds Forge Company in England. C3102 is one of a couple of survivors and entered electric service with the very first such train in 1926. It was retired around 1990. It displays the twin entrance vestibules that remained a feature of all suburban electric coaches built subsequently.

40, C3102, Sydney Terminal.jpg

 

XPT

 

The NSWGR was re-organised and restructured in the 1970s and 1980s, becoming the Public Transport Commission of NSW and then State Rail Authority of NSW (SRA). There have been further restructures since then.

 

In 1982, the first XPTs began service with the SRA. These had a long development from the UK-designed HSTs. A great deal of research and practical trial work was carried out by the SRA Laboratories in consultation with the Mechanical Branch Design Office before the design was settled with Commonwealth Engineering who assembled the vehicles, using “a blend of local and imported components”. Differences included:

  • Larger aluminium cooling groups (to cope with higher temperatures)
  • De-rated Paxman diesel engines (to cope with higher temperatures)
  • Higher capacity air conditioning systems
  • No guard’s compartment in the power car
  • Welded construction of bogies instead of bolted or riveted
  • Fluted stainless steel bodies on trailer coaches – consistent with other long-distance loco hauled coaches
  • Increased vertical travel of axleboxes in bogies
  • Different spring rates in all bogies
  • Lower maximum speed

The units have been a great success and are still in service. On test, they set a new Southern Hemisphere speed record (183 kph) in 1983.

 

Here is an image of one of the units entering Hornsby (northern Sydney), wearing its original livery:

42, XPT, Hornsby.jpg

 

Here is an image of one of the sets in the second livery on Maldon Curve on the main south line in 1993:

41, Southbound XPT, Maldon Curve, 21 Aug 93.jpg

 

2. Silverton Tramway

 

Broken Hill, in western NSW, is closer to South Australian ports than those in NSW. For many years it remained isolated from the main part of the NSWGR. The rich silver-lead-zinc mines needed rail transport and the nearest system was the 3ft 6in gauge South Australian system. However the NSW government would not permit the SAR to run their rails into Broken Hill.

 

The privately-owned Silverton Tramway filled that gap, running narrow-gauge trains from the border to and from Broken Hill. Even after the standard gauge reached Broken Hill, it remained more economic to rail the ore out via South Australia. Most of the designs of Silverton locos were copies of others already running in other states. Here are some examples.

 

Y-class 2-6-0

These were also used in Queensland, Tasmania, South Australia, Northern Territory, and Western Australia. Most seem to have been built by Beyer Peacock, but some also were built locally. The Silverton locos entered service in 1888.

58, Sulphide Station Museum, Broken Hill, 22 Sep 87 - Silverton Y 1 - Beyer Peacock 2791_1888.jpg

 

A Class 4-6-0

These locos were copies of the TGR E class and all 4 were built by Beyer Peacock around 1915.

60, Mile End Rly Museum, 1 Jan 78, Silverton Tramway A21, Beyer Peacock 5913 of 1915.JPG

 

W Class 4-8-2

 

This class of four locos was simply a streamlined version of the WAGR W class. They were built by Beyer Peacock and operated from 1951 to the early 1960s.

61, Mile End Rly Museum, 1 Jan 78,  Silverton Tramway W25 HF Gerry Walsh, Beyer Peacock 7553 of 1951.JPG

 

3. Locos Built for Other Private Railways

 

Many British manufacturers exported their products around the Empire/Commonwealth. Here are some images of just a few of them that came to NSW.

 

Andrew Barclay

 

Associated Portland Cement Co No.3 (Barclay 1234/1911), Portland

55, APC 3 - Barclay 1234 of 1911 , Assoc Portland Cement Co, Portland, 30 Nov 73.JPG

 

“Alison” (Barclay 1738/1923)

Here are details of her varied career: http://www.australia....com/Alison.htm

56, Alison, Barclay 1738 of 1923, RVR museum, 3 Jan 2010.JPG

 

Avonside

 

Richmond Vale Railway 0-6-0ST No.2 (Avonside 1916/1922).

This loco worked for Abermain Seaham Collieries (which was taken over by the Richmond Vale Railway) from 1922 until 1969.

42a, 2, RVR, Hexham, 3 Sep 73.JPG

 

South Bulli No. 4 (Avonside 1574/1909) worked at South Bulli Colliery from 1909 until 1967.

57, South Bulli No 4, Avonside 1574 of 1909, Bulli, 15 Feb 70.JPG

 

“Marjorie” (Clyde Engineering 462/1938) was a copy of an Avonside design. Here is her biography: http://www.australia...om/Marjorie.htm

54, Richmond Main museum, Australia Day, 1990 - Marjorie, Clyde Engineering 462 of 1938 - copy of Avonside.jpg

 

Beyer Peacock

 

South Maitland Railway 2-8-2T

These large locos were essentially a tank version of the NSWGR T(524)/D50 class, also built by BP. The entire class of 14 locos survived into preservation, having worked from their introduction in 1912 until the closure of the Richmond Vale Railway in 1986.

 

Here are some images of them in regular service:

48, SMR 23, Between Maitland & Cessnock, SMR, 18 Aug 71.JPG

 

47, RVR visit, 18 Aug 86 - SMR 27, Hexham.JPG

 

Hudswell Clarke

 

Hudswell Clarke 2ft gauge cane locos were used in many canefields around NSW and Queensland to haul newly harvested sugar cane to nearby sugar mills. Several of them found a new career on tourist tramways. Here are two of them:

 

Hudswell Clarke (1862/1953), Timbertown (near Wauchope), NSW

This loco once worked at the Macknade Mill, near Ingham (Qld.).

52, Timbertown, NSW, Dec 79, Hudswell Clarke, Leeds, 1862_1953.JPG

51, Timbertown, NSW, Dec 79, Hudswell Clarke, Leeds, 1862_1953.JPG

 

Hudswell Clarke 1098/1915, Goulburn Steam Museum.

This loco used to work at the Gin Gin Mill, Wallaville (Qld).

50, Goulburn Steam Museum 4 Sep 71 - Hudswell Clarke 1098_1915.JPG

 

49, Goulburn Steam Museum 4 Sep 71 - Hudswell Clarke 1098_1915.JPG

 

Kitson

 

Richmond Vale Railway Kitson 0-6-0ST

 

RVR No.3 (Kitson 2263/1878) was a copy of NSWGR No. 20N (a favourite of the owner, John Brown). It survived to be preserved in the 1970s.

43, 3, RVR, Hexham, 3 Sep 73.JPG

 

RVR No.4 (Kitson 1620/1870) was originally NSWGR No. 20N (a favourite of the owner, John Brown). It survived to be preserved in the 1970s.

45, 4 Sir Edward Warren, ex RVR, Broadmeadow, Nov 74.JPG

 

Richmond Vale Railway 2-8-2T

 

RVR Nos 9 & 10 (Kitson 4567/1908 and 4798/1911) were typical British industrial export tank engines. Locos of similar style, exported to South Africa, can be found in Colin Garratt “Steam Safari” (Blandford, 1974) in plates 11, 12, 18, 29, 34 and 44. These locos remained in service until about 1976 when they were replaced by South Maitland Railway 2-8-2Ts (described above).

46, Richmond Main Museum, 08 Jan 95 - RVR Nos 9 & 10.jpg

 

Manning Wardle

 

“Possum” (Manning Wardle 1802/ 1912) was a steelworks engine that worked in both Lithgow and Port Kembla. Her career is described here: http://www.australia....com/Possum.htm

62, Possum, ex-AIS, Lithgow Museum, 22 Jan 71, Manning Wardle 1802 of 1912.JPG

 

4. Visitors

 

Stephenson’s Rocket Replica

This interesting replica drew many curious crowds when exhibited in Sydney during 1982 as part of an overseas promotional tour for the National Railway Museum (York).

53, Stephensons Rocket replica, Hyde Park, Sydney, Feb 82.JPG

 

References:

  1. C.H.Lake “The World’s Locomotives” (Percival Marshall, 1906)
  2. J.H.Forsyth: “Steam Locomotive Data” (Public Transport Commission of NSW, 1974)
  3. Colin Garratt “Steam Safari” (Blandford, 1974)
  4. Leon Oberg: “Locomotives of Australia” (A.H. & A.W.Reed, 1975) – ISBN 0 589 07173 4
  5. J.W.P.Rowledge: “Heavy Goods Engines of the War Department, Volume 1, The ROD 2-8-0” (Springmead Railway Books, 1977)
  6. Alex Grunbach: “A Compendium of NSW Steam Locomotives (ARHS, 1989) – ISBN 0 909650 27 6
  7. R.G.Preston ”The Richmond Vale Railway (Shepp Books, 1990) – ISBN 0 909862 26 http://www.australia.../nswgrframe.htm
  8. http://en.wikipedia....Harold_Holcroft

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#62 69843

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Posted 01 April 2013 - 05:49

That...is a long list!

 

I'd just been told by a friend of the replica Rocket visiting Sydney, and the Easter Show. That would have been a most unique sight to behold.

 

As I said earlier, 6029 is due back into service this year. Something tells me once I hear her, I shall never be the same again...I hope they take her up Como Bank, that good ol' infamous 1 in 40 right near me.



#63 br-nse-fan

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Posted 01 April 2013 - 18:28

Dominion of Canada... in Canada...

 

http://www.rrpicture...aspx?id=3179424

 

http://www.rrpicture...aspx?id=3180680

 

Class 66's awaiting export from Canada to the UK...

 

http://www.railpictu...t/photo/178889/

 

And a couple more.. one each one the following pages:

 

http://www.therailwa...OD_Oct2006.html

 

http://www.therailwa...OD_Jan2007.html

 

I don't think you can get much more of a British Outline and oversea's... ;)



#64 Bernard Lamb

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Posted 01 April 2013 - 18:43

I seem to remember seeing a Double Fairlie locomotive in the museum in Dunedin many years ago.

Similar machines must have been exported to a good many other countries.

Bernard



#65 EddieB

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Posted 01 April 2013 - 22:38

I seem to remember seeing a Double Fairlie locomotive in the museum in Dunedin many years ago.

Similar machines must have been exported to a good many other countries.

Bernard

Yes.  Inter alia, Avonside, Yorkshire Engine and Sharp Stewart supplied Fairlie locomotives to the Poti-Tiflis and Tambov-Saratov railways (both later Trans Caucausus Railway) in Russia,   RW Hawthorns built a couple that went to the 750mm gauge lines of the Saxon State Railways.  Others went to Sweden, Norway, France, Australia  and Burma (and South Africa, if you count "modified Fairlies" built by North British*).  I'd recommend the book by Donald Binns, "Fairlie Articluated Locomotives, Vol 1 - On the American Continent" for coverage of the many North and South American countries that received and ran Fairlies (a second volume, covering the rest of the world, was planned but AFAIK never published).  (See also "Fairlie Locomotives" by RAS Abbot, although alleged to contain some errors, including some perpetuated from Robert Fairlie's own records).

 

I did enjoy finding a picture recently of a double Sentinel, built for South Africa, that seemed similar to the Fairlie principle.

 

*Better not get started on the other articulated locomotives these resembled - the Beyer Garratts.



#66 Valentin

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Posted 02 June 2013 - 07:55

[...] Or the British-owned Danube and Black Sea Railway - apparently the North London Railway minutes record the sale of an 0-6-0 in 1867, but the rest of its history is obscure (before and after the sale). [...]

 

According to the information I've got, there are seven "Beyer Peacock" C-n2 locomotives built for the Danube & Black Sea Railway (DBSR) between 1860 and 1862:

  • 120 (DBSR no. 1 - "Ovidius") and 121 (DBSR no. 2 "Tomis") in 1860
  • 191 (DBSR no. 4), 192 (DBSR no. 3 - "Tighina"), 193 (DBSR no. 5) and 194 (DBSR no. 6) in 1861
  • 329 or 330 (DBSR no. 7) in 1862

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#67 EddieB

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Posted 02 June 2013 - 11:06

Yes, Beyer Peacock supplied a seven locomotives new to the Cernavoda-Constanta section of the Danube and Black Sea Railway.  BP 120/1859 "OVIDIU" and 121/1859 were the first of a batch of six ordered, but were the only two sent (b/ns 122-125 went to the LNWR).  These locomotives were joined by two second-hand Manning Wardle 0-6-0STs (originally named "CHRISTOPHER" and "CHESHIRE"), which the railway renumbered 8 and 9.  This section of railway passed into ownership of the Roumanian Tate Railways (CFR) in 1882, with the Beyer Peacocks renumbered consecutively 681-687 and the Manning Wardles 04 and 05.

 

The Danube and Black Sea also opened another section from Ruse to Varna (modern Bulgaria) and it is to this section that the second-hand locomotives from British main line railways went (putatively).  The North London Railway 0-6-0 no. 11 apparently sold to the Danube and Black Sea Railway was built by Sharp Stewart (although the builder's details given as 843/1854) don't tally to the builder's lists). There is also a record of a North London 0-4-0ST no. 12 (again a Sharp Stewart product, "856"/185) being sold there too - whether either or both these locomotives actually went is still a mystery, A third rumour concerns the erstwhile LNWR 1106, also reputedly sold to the Danube and Black Sea Railway.

 

Concerning new locomotives, the position is clearer.  BP built three 0-6-0s: 330/1862, 834/1868 and 925/1869 as nos. 11-13.  (Some sources add a fourth, claiming that BP 329/1862 went here instead of Cernavoda-Constanta, becoming Oriental Railways no. 289).  Sharp Stewart supplied eight 0-6-0s (b/ns 1865-8, 1871-4 of 1868), which took number 14-21.

 

The Ruse-Varna line was sold to the Ottoman Government in 1869, who later passed operating rights to the Oriental Railways.  In 1888 the line was bought by the Bulgarian government.

 

Famously one of the Sharp Stewart batch survives in the railway museum at Ruse, Bulgarian.  Originally no. 20 (SS 1873/1868), it carries the number allocated in the Bulgarian renumbering of 1908.

 

BDZ146a.jpg

 

 


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#68 25901

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Posted 02 June 2013 - 11:32

Hi

Here's one just stopped working last year I believe after 70 years service (yes 70). No one from the UK is wanting it from what my Italian co factory work mates tell me

http://www.trenomani...bum=142&pos=133

I know how important this one is in shunter history


Edited by 25901, 02 June 2013 - 11:35 .

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#69 EddieB

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Posted 02 June 2013 - 19:23

That shunter does indeed represent an important piece of British history, and I'd be disappointed if there is no interest from the UK.

 

It was an LMS design, built at Derby in 1941, becoming WD 70055 and one of a batch sold to the Italian State Railways in 1946.  Happily one of its classmates is preserved in the railway museum at Torino.


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#70 SM42

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Posted 02 June 2013 - 20:56

EWS liveried class 66s in Poland. 66173 to be precise, I was certainly surprised to see it.

 

There are 15 ex EWS 66s  out there apparently

 

The Polish EU06 was, I believe, an English Electric product.

 

Andy



#71 Michael Edge

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Posted 02 June 2013 - 21:06

That shunter does indeed represent an important piece of British history, and I'd be disappointed if there is no interest from the UK.

 

It was an LMS design, built at Derby in 1941, becoming WD 70055 and one of a batch sold to the Italian State Railways in 1946.  Happily one of its classmates is preserved in the railway museum at Torino.

There's a lot of interest from here, we have a 1:87 scale kit nearly ready. It covers 700 003 and the one at Turin which is rather less altered from the original - and also the WD LMS locos.

Michael Edge

Judith Edge kits


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#72 25901

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Posted 02 June 2013 - 21:29

That shunter does indeed represent an important piece of British history, and I'd be disappointed if there is no interest from the UK.

 

It was an LMS design, built at Derby in 1941, becoming WD 70055 and one of a batch sold to the Italian State Railways in 1946.  Happily one of its classmates is preserved in the railway museum at Torino.

The one at Torino is I believe is in a bad condition due to the museum storage yard being flooded in 2000, most of the main stock has been moved to there new museum but this has been left at the old storage site. Don't know how to copy it over but you can see it using Bing maps, 

Type or paste in  "Via Borgo Dora, 10152 Turin"  ( the yellow shunter )

 

 

 

 

 


Edited by 25901, 02 June 2013 - 21:43 .

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#73 faulcon1

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Posted 28 June 2013 - 03:43

Here are three recent photos taken at the Rail Transport Museum (now known as 'Trainworks') in 2012.

They show the current condition of three exhibits out of normal public view. The first is a set of incomplete bogies for a Metropolitan Vickers 46 class electric locomotive.

The other two show the current state of Ex Mersey Railway 0-6-4 tank No.1/ Ex J.A Brown No.5. The current management don't seem to think this priceless relic is worthy of storage in the new museum. In fact it's been stored in the open ever since it came to the Thirlmere site and was originally on their 'condemmed road'.

 

faulcon1.

Attached Thumbnails

  • RTM 083.JPG
  • RTM 080.JPG
  • RTM 079.JPG

Edited by faulcon1, 07 November 2017 - 20:20 .

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#74 EddieB

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Posted 28 June 2013 - 12:59

Well, I suppose we should be thankful that Thirlmere isn't Chamdor.

 

Sadly the other ex-Mersey Railway 0-6-4T saved for posterity has been in long-term storage in Bootle and is not on public display.



#75 faulcon1

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Posted 28 June 2013 - 13:33

Here's some photos of Dorrigo steam 'museum' locos. There is a gate with a sign which reads: "Museum not open". That notice was on that gate when I was 10. I've just passed my half century and it's STILL there. I don't think there will ever be a museum here. All photo taken in October 2012.

Two ex J.A Brown ROD's, numbers 20 and 24 but which is which is hard to say as the locos had cast number plates like GWR locos.

Attached Thumbnails

  • 2012 holiday 024.JPG

Edited by faulcon1, 30 November 2014 - 23:29 .

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