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Porth Dinllaen in 0

0 gauge O gauge Cambrian coast Nefyn GWR 1930s Porth Dinllaen




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#851 Simond

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Posted 28 June 2018 - 23:21

Clockmaker? - there’s skill in that trade, and it’s pretty unusual. I guess the skills & experience of metalworking shows in your modelmaking. How did you get into that?

I’ve got quite a bit of cad experience, but I’m not at all sure it’s hugely relevant - still, if I can help, don’t hesitate to ask.

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Simon
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#852 hayfield

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Posted 29 June 2018 - 07:55

Simond

 

I guess to a certain degree programs become more operator friendly, plus the hardware to do the cutting becomes both cheaper to buy and easier to use. So for anyone interested it is easier to get involved in the design and or manufacture of items. Then of course many have restricted time on their hands, so many things we would like to do with so little time available

 

Having said this the ability to put these sequences into operation from an idea in the mind to a set of usable parts does in my mind take a lot of special skills coming together


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#853 Simond

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Posted 29 June 2018 - 13:30

Hi John,

It’s certainly true that CAD & CAM have become hugely more accessible over the last decade or so, I guess the increase in availability of PCs as their cost came down, boosts the market potential, and businesses see the opportunity.

I recently employed a young engineer, he’s very interested in 3D printing, and occasionally makes bits for me, alongside some pretty technical stuff to improve his own printer. It cost around £300. Lasers are in the range of £500, Silhouette cutters are a couple of hundred, even NC milling & engraving at a few hundred, none of which was mainstream 10 years ago. I remember being utterly captivated by an NC miller at a Model Engineering exhibition some years back, and it was utterly unaffordable - £’000’s.

So it’s exciting times for those of us who enjoy such toys!

Regarding bringing it all together - I guess it’s my profession, so I’m not at all sure why I do it for fun too!

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Simon
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#854 Focalplane

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Posted 29 June 2018 - 18:30

Simon

I have always thought of myself as a Jack of All Trades, Master of None. I have dabbled in this and that and learned and forgotten a lot along the way. When I retired I was thinking of doing what Alan Buttler is doing so successfully. I even thought his choice of 3D printer was the way to go, but I am glad I didn’t because Alan has taken his business model way beyond my ken and I am a much better customer than competitor.

I can’t remember my first CAD program, it was for an 8086 CPU! But then I found myself the owner of a Mac IIfx when a potential business partner declared bankruptcy and I had to buy the damned thing for thousands of dollars. Actually, it was a turning point and although I wanted to pursue CAD, as a geologist it was not the ideal machine (all the major oil companies dropped Macs around 1986 because the Mac threatened their IT job security). Sometimes being different actually helps one’s career. I became good at economics thanks to an industry downturn and Excel on the Mac worked really well. Then it was desktop publishing and the Mac came into its own though my employer at the time, who knew nothing about computers, could not understand why I used my own Mac at work. i made him a wealthy man and then he fired me. True!

I am rambling but the point is that when you cast around with a fishing rod you never know what you might catch. The odd old boot one day, 50 mackerel the next.

I remember a saying when starting out in America. It’s not true you can’t teach an old dog new tricks, he’s fed up with the old ones.

So true, Paul
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#855 Simond

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Posted 01 July 2018 - 08:08

Well, after some though, and measurement, and head scratching, the floor and pits of the #1 model have been consigned to the bin, and a complete new floor cut. Call it a prototype. The issue was to do with chairing the rails. I’m going to Didcot on Castle’s tour in a few weeks so there’s an opportunity for more photos, and they’re required, but I now have the “shelf” along the sides of the pit a bit wider, and the pit a bit narrower. I’ve gone for 25mm, which is a shade over 3’6”, which is a “believable number”, but of course the track is 43mm further apart in reality! I suppose I could have made the shed track to 33mm, I don’t suppose anything would have fallen down the gap...

The whole floor has now been cut, pre-painted, and the first quadrants are glued together. The laser will accept pieces up to 9”x12”, which is what I now cut from the 3’x4’ sheets, but I had a stock of A4 originally, and designed the floor panels around that.

Effectively the floor is 8 sheets each a bit less than A4, each cut to a horseshoe, to drop the inspection pit in. The open ends are glued together, and drying as I type. Photos later today I hope.

The pits are slot-and-tab and are now made. I probably won’t glue them in til they’re weathered.

I had a pot of pale grey emulsion from my daughter’s bedroom redecoration, which I took some of, and thinned. Two coats, with a bit of brushing out here & there forms a reasonable base for a bit of specking, and a good helping of dirt. Not too much, the shed is supposed to be no more than a few years old, but locos are grubby, oily beasts at the best of times.

More later,
Best
Simon
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#856 Simond

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Posted 01 July 2018 - 15:16

Photos...

DED0FEC6-2363-4887-AE77-33D2B12C5739.jpeg

Rear half of the floor with rails fitted & pits clipped into place.


7EAE80EC-BCF5-4EEE-8FCA-2E7D85C43D49.jpeg

Front half, glue drying...

Best
Simon
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