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Kirkallanmuir

2FS caledonian



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#101 Allegheny1600

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Posted 02 December 2017 - 14:48

Hi Jim,

Sorry for the rash of "like"s etc but I've just been catching up.

Stunning work and what gets me is your photography! I find it really hard to photograph small parts well in H0 scale but in 2mm?

Well done, sir!

John.


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#102 Caley Jim

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Posted 02 December 2017 - 20:16

Stunning work and what gets me is your photography! I find it really hard to photograph small parts well in H0 scale but in 2mm?

Well done, sir!

Thanks john (and Northroader). They're nothing special.  Taken on my phone in ambient light as a wider shot, downloaded on to the PC, colour corrected with MS Picture Manager (I always include some white in the background) and cropped.

 

Jim


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#103 Caley Jim

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Posted 02 December 2017 - 20:52

Bits for the interior.

 

signal box #19.JPG

 

L-R instrument shelf and lever ID board; lever frame; desk and chair.

 

I have to confess that the way of producing the levers and the artwork for the desk have been blatantly copied from David Eveleigh.

 

I've still to work out the lever sequence, not only to get the colours correct, but also to have those which operate FPL's in the 'set' position.

 

Jim


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#104 Caley Jim

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Posted 05 December 2017 - 14:37

Progress will be slow this week due to life getting in the way of more important things. :no2:

 

Lengths of wire have been added along the ridges to help shape the ridge leading later; the gutters have been added in 20thou styrene and the down-pipes fitted.

 

signal box #20.JPG

 

You can just about see the levers sitting in place.  The support for the stairs is not leaning, that's just an illusion created by the camera. Both the box and the support are dead vertical to the base - I've checked with an engineer's tri-square!

 

Next up will be to paint the tops of the gutters black (well, dirty grey) and then glue a layer of paper to the roof slopes with Evostik onto which the strips of paper slates can be attached with PVA.  I don't trust PVA to stick to metal and gluing on the strips of slates with Evostik will be messy.

 

I've consulted with the Guru on CR signal boxes and the consensus is that handrails across the window mullions would probably not have been fitted until late in the companies history.

 

Jim


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#105 bécasse

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Posted 05 December 2017 - 20:51

Getting slates right is difficult in any of the small scales and especially so in 2mm. A pile of old slates in my cellar stacks almost exactly 100 to the foot, so they would be no more than 0,02mm (or a bit less than 1/1000th of an inch) thick each in 2FS and that needs quite a thin sheet of paper if overlapping is to be represented - and that doesn't include any allowance for the finite thickness of the adhesive. I am glad that it is your problem rather than mine!

 

What I can do, though, is to suggest the use of gloss acrylic artists' varnish, readily obtainable in small bottles from art shops or even some stationers, and applied by brush, which, by soaking through, should glue overlapping strips both to each other and to the brass base. I would sand the brass first to provide a key and possibly drill some random fine holes. The varnish dries quite quickly but should give adequate time for manoeuvring strips into their correct position. When completely dry it will give a good base for paint.


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#106 Caley Jim

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Posted 06 December 2017 - 13:51

Getting slates right is difficult in any of the small scales and especially so in 2mm. A pile of old slates in my cellar stacks almost exactly 100 to the foot, so they would be no more than 0,02mm (or a bit less than 1/1000th of an inch) thick each in 2FS and that needs quite a thin sheet of paper if overlapping is to be represented - and that doesn't include any allowance for the finite thickness of the adhesive. I am glad that it is your problem rather than mine!

 

What I can do, though, is to suggest the use of gloss acrylic artists' varnish, readily obtainable in small bottles from art shops or even some stationers, and applied by brush, which, by soaking through, should glue overlapping strips both to each other and to the brass base. I would sand the brass first to provide a key and possibly drill some random fine holes. The varnish dries quite quickly but should give adequate time for manoeuvring strips into their correct position. When completely dry it will give a good base for paint.

Thanks for that Bécasse.  I have some slates as edgings in the garden and they measure between just over ½" and just over ¼" thick.  In 2mm ½" is 0.083mm.  I plan to use 80gsm paper which is cc0.1mm thick (10sheets + 1mm).  I've allowed for 2x this thickness in the design of the etch, so I'm committed.

 

I've already used this paper for the slates on the warehouse building .  I tried using tissue paper for the slates on the weighbridge office, but felt they were too 'flat'.  Sometimes I find things look better if they are very slightly overscale.

 

Thanks also for the tip on the varnish.  I only stick the strips to the roof, and not to one another.  This lets you 'lift' the odd slate or two slightly and give more texture to the roof.

 

Jim


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#107 Caley Jim

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Posted 06 December 2017 - 14:36

I've just checked out the thickness of newspaper and find that 10 sheets = 0.6mm, i.e.a sheet is 0.06mm thick.  This falls neatly between the scale 0.083mm of a ½" thick slate and the 0.0415mm of a ¼" thick one.  I've successfully printed out the 'grid' I use from which to cut the strips, so that's what I'll use!   ;)  

 

Jim



#108 bécasse

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Posted 06 December 2017 - 21:51

This lets you 'lift' the odd slate or two slightly and give more texture to the roof.

 

 

Slates don't lift slightly. They are laid with a considerable lap, ie the majority of any individual slate lies under other slates and that ensures that they lie flat. If a roof were laid with slates of varying thickness - and I think that very unlikely on any railway structure - it might just give the impression of "lifting" but the roof wouldn't be very watertight either.

 

What you might just get is the odd slipped slate where the fixing nail(s) have rusted through. Normally they slipped straight down, constrained by the remainder of the slates. A slate that had slipped right out of position might well still lie on top of other slates on the roof, pushed around by the wind and so lying diagonally. The odd chipped slate is a possibility too - although really I would have expected the Caley to have ensured that slates on its signal box roofs stayed in good order.



#109 BG John

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Posted 06 December 2017 - 21:57

What you might just get is the odd slipped slate where the fixing nail(s) have rusted through. Normally they slipped straight down, constrained by the remainder of the slates. A slate that had slipped right out of position might well still lie on top of other slates on the roof, pushed around by the wind and so lying diagonally. The odd chipped slate is a possibility too - although really I would have expected the Caley to have ensured that slates on its signal box roofs stayed in good order.

If the roofer doesn't turn up before it's light to fix my hole, I could take some photos in the morning if you like. I suppose I ought to have some for modelling purposes anyway!


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#110 Caley Jim

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Posted 11 December 2017 - 22:51

Slates finally applied and painted (they look horrible when they've just been stuck on with all the printed lines showing) and the lead ridging added.  I needed to put the brick paper on the chimney before applying the slates in order to get the flashing on that fitted under the slates at the top and sides.

 

signal box #21.JPG

 

The chimney pot is just sitting on the top as I don't want to fix it in place until the painting is finished for fear of it getting damaged.

 

Time to call in the painters!  :yes:

 

Jim


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#111 Donw

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Posted 13 December 2017 - 00:08

Slates don't lift slightly. They are laid with a considerable lap, ie the majority of any individual slate lies under other slates and that ensures that they lie flat. If a roof were laid with slates of varying thickness - and I think that very unlikely on any railway structure - it might just give the impression of "lifting" but the roof wouldn't be very watertight either.

 

What you might just get is the odd slipped slate where the fixing nail(s) have rusted through. Normally they slipped straight down, constrained by the remainder of the slates. A slate that had slipped right out of position might well still lie on top of other slates on the roof, pushed around by the wind and so lying diagonally. The odd chipped slate is a possibility too - although really I would have expected the Caley to have ensured that slates on its signal box roofs stayed in good order.

 

They dont lift but if the rafters warp or sag the slates have to respond. I have reroofed an outbuilding with the slates on new flat joists some of the slates seemed to have warped two as they are NOT flat  now. This has meant they are not lying as flat as I would like. I have had similar problems with tiles. Some old handmade ones were so warped you have to take about 6 at a time to find one which would lay flate next to the ones already laid.  That said I suspect the Caley would be using deep enough rafters for them not to warp or sag.

 

Don



#112 bécasse

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Posted 13 December 2017 - 13:26

They dont lift but if the rafters warp or sag the slates have to respond. I have reroofed an outbuilding with the slates on new flat joists some of the slates seemed to have warped two as they are NOT flat  now. This has meant they are not lying as flat as I would like. I have had similar problems with tiles. Some old handmade ones were so warped you have to take about 6 at a time to find one which would lay flate next to the ones already laid.  That said I suspect the Caley would be using deep enough rafters for them not to warp or sag.

 

I don't disagree with your comments although in my experience slates that start to "warp" are actually life-expired and starting to delaminate (an effect which becomes quite serious when, typically, they near their centenary). However, as you suspect, and I stated, the Caley would have gone to considerable trouble to ensure that the roof of a significant signal box was in good order. I suppose that it is just possible that mining subsidence could cause the roof to warp, but if it did it would be causing much greater problems within the "delicate" machinery of the signal box (presumably concrete rafts were used as foundations for signal boxes in areas where subsidence was considered possible) and would be obvious from the general appearance of the box. In fact, the modelled box looks as immaculate as it should do.



#113 Caley Jim

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Posted 22 December 2017 - 17:35

Well, the painters have been and done their work, as have the glaziers, and the internal fittings are in place.

 

signal box #22.JPG

 

Yes, the box identification boards really were that small (Signaling the Caledonian Railway p195).  How train crew were supposed to read 3" high letters is anyone's guess!

 

signal box #24.JPG

 

A couple of the interior :-

signal box #25.JPG

signal box #26.JPG

 

Note the duster hanging on one of the FPL levers.

 

And finally the box in situ on the layout.

from the operator's side

signal box #27.JPG

 

And a couple from the viewing side.

signal box #28.JPG

signal box #29.JPG

 

It won't be getting properly bedded in until I get a coal bin for under the stairs made and possibly a plate layer's hut to put on the far side of the box from the steps.

 

Thanks to those of you who have persevered with this saga and for the kind and helpful comments.


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#114 Branwell

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Posted 22 December 2017 - 18:43

Lovely job, Jim - it looks very much at home.

 

Regards,

 

David V.


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#115 Donw

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Posted 22 December 2017 - 19:50

Well, the painters have been and done their work, as have the glaziers, and the internal fittings are in place.

 

attachicon.gifsignal box #22.JPG

 

Yes, the box identification boards really were that small (Signaling the Caledonian Railway p195).  How train crew were supposed to read 3" high letters is anyone's guess!

 

attachicon.gifsignal box #24.JPG

 

A couple of the interior :-

attachicon.gifsignal box #25.JPG

attachicon.gifsignal box #26.JPG

 

Note the duster hanging on one of the FPL levers.

 

And finally the box in situ on the layout.

from the operator's side

attachicon.gifsignal box #27.JPG

 

And a couple from the viewing side.

attachicon.gifsignal box #28.JPG

attachicon.gifsignal box #29.JPG

 

It won't be getting properly bedded in until I get a coal bin for under the stairs made and possibly a plate layer's hut to put on the far side of the box from the steps.

 

Thanks to those of you who have persevered with this saga and for the kind and helpful comments.

 

Lovely job Jim. If the driver doesn't know which box is which I don't think much of his route learning. That does leave the question of for whom the nameplates are intended.

 

Don


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#116 Caley Jim

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Posted 22 December 2017 - 22:36

Lovely job Jim. If the driver doesn't know which box is which I don't think much of his route learning. That does leave the question of for whom the nameplates are intended.

Don


Thanks Don.

According to the book having the name on the box was a BoT requirement.

Jim

#117 Donw

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Posted 22 December 2017 - 23:32

Thanks Don.

According to the book having the name on the box was a BoT requirement.

Jim

 

Ah so its the BoT Inspector who needs to know where he is!

 

Don



#118 Caley Jim

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Posted 27 December 2017 - 22:33

Despite the festive season I've managed to get a shed-load of modelling done! :-)

DSC_0651.JPG


Jim
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#119 Caley Jim

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Posted 31 December 2017 - 23:36

A Guide New Year tae all o' ye who have had the time on your hands to follow this thread and make such kind and encouraging comments.

Jim
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#120 Caley Jim

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Posted 10 January 2018 - 14:40

While I'm waiting on the etches for point rodding stools coming I've been making some of the boxes and ramps which the Caley were considerate enough to use to cover over the cranks, compensators, FPL's etc.

 

I've made up the cover over the rods etc. at the front of the box along with the first sections of the rods which will cross under the Down Loop and then run along the 10 foot between that and the Down Main.  The ramp in the 4 foot covering these rods means that they can be made in two sections avoiding any risk of touching the rails and causing shorts.  The Down Main Home will have to be moved a couple of mm to keep it clear of the box covering the other ends of these rods.  This has allowed me to get the signal box finally bedded in and the lamp hut and coal bunker fixed in place.

 

signal box #30.JPG

signal box #31.JPG

 

Compare these with the lower photos in post 113.

 

Here endeth the saga of Kirkallanmuir Weighs signal box!   :sungum:

 

Jim  (edited to correct post number)


Edited by Caley Jim, 10 January 2018 - 14:41 .

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#121 Caley Jim

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Posted 21 January 2018 - 22:04

As the etches for the point rodding stools have still to arrive I have been working on another little building.  This is a small agricultural building which may well have started life as the home of a cottar - a small tenant farmer - as far back as the c17th or early c18th, originally thatched with turf, but, by the time of Kirkallanmuir, is now used for storage of feedstuffs, small tools etc. and roofed with corrugated iron.  A such it is not a carefully constructed building, but one which is of the 'rough and ready' school of architecture and has undergone modification over the years.

 

I started with a shell of 40thou styrene, 20thou small all round, with a roof of 20thou which overhangs the sides and ends by 20thou.  To make the stone surface I intended to use the Advanced Formula Pollyfilla Nigel showed us at the last group meeting, however our local ironmonger only had the regular stuff, of which I already had a tube.  Undeterred I just used that (there was no need for it to be flexible) and spread a 20thou thick layer on each wall in turn, letting each one dry before coating the next.  The filler was allowed to spill over the edges into the window and door openings and then trimmed back flush with the styrene with a craft knife.  Given the nature of the building, I made no attempt to make the walls perfectly smooth or the corners perfectly sharp, though any serious bumps were shaved back and any gross defects filled in.  This was the result at that stage.

 

Barn #1.JPG

 

The roof was deliberately made uneven.

 

I cut some templates from 20thou styrene to help me scribe the quoins, lintels and sills onto the surface and then painted them a 'sandstone' colour.  the rest of the walls were roughly painted a mix of grey stone colours to simulate areas which had been repaired and/or cement rendered.  Unfortunately the acrylic paint I used for this dried with a slight sheen, so I had to dust it all over with grey powder paint to flatten it.  I would use powder or poster paint if I was doing it again.  The doors and windows are styrene, the former with wire handles.

 

The roof was covered in strips of kitchen foil formed into corrugated iron using two bottle tops and these were glued on using a generous layer of Easitrac glue.  You need to cut a strip a good bit longer than you need as forming the corrugations takes up some of the length.  I found that the 100mm lengths I cut were down to 90mm by the time I had rolled them. I only needed 81mm, so between the surplus and some trial bits I have plenty spare 'sheets' to perhaps use as a wagon part-load.  Another strip of foil formed the ridging.  The roof was painted with a thin coat of grey, followed by some streaks of dark rust.

 

Barn #2.JPG

Barn #3.JPG

 

And in situ on the layout, though still to be fixed down and bedded in.

 

Barn #4.JPG

Barn #5.JPG

 

A bit of a 'quickie' as there was no need to be too precise about any aspect of it, but it will fill what would otherwise be an open space near the front of the layout.  I should add that the foil is very delicate where it overhangs the walls slightly, so the building has to be handled with care!

 

Jim

 

 


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#122 Lacathedrale

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Posted 14 February 2018 - 11:51

Hi Jim,

 

I keep coming back to your ingenious layout plan, but I was wondering if you had an overall system diagram (as opposed to track plan). It seems as though the mainline runs from fiddle-yard to fiddle yard across the back, with one end representing the platform ends of a through station. A branch diverges centre-left and exchange sidings for the branch are lower left. Middle and lower left are the goods yards and MPD for the station itself. Is that about right? The space used seems to be a hair under 10' and it's amazingly impressive how much you've fit in. Can I ask what kind of train lengths you're using? 

 

All the very best,



#123 Caley Jim

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Posted 14 February 2018 - 20:29

For Bill's benefit (and anyone else whose interested) here is a schematic diagram of the layout which I hope clarifies things.  The red line represents the (still to be produced) backscene.

 

Schenatic Diagram.JPG

 

Your assessment is partially correct,except that there is no MPD, only a turntable and water tank.  The colliery is imagined to be only ½ mile away and the branch is worked one-engine-in-steam with the loco always at the Kirkallanmuir end (i.e. empties are propelled to the colliery).

 

The cassettes are 700mm long, giving c688mm train space (12mm at each end is taken up with connections and a door) allowing a loco and 13-14 wagons and a van, or a loco and up to 5 45' coaches.  I have other shorter cassettes as well.  The interchange sidings are around 500mm long and will take the same 13-14 mineral wagons.  that's about as many as my 0-4-2 can comfortably handle.

 

Jim


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#124 Caley Jim

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Posted 01 March 2018 - 20:51

Modelling time has been somewhat sparse of late as other things have taken priority, however, being confined to barracks by the snow has given me some time to install the first run of point rodding using Laurie Adam's etched stools as described in the last MRJ.  Having studied photos of CR rod runs and consulted on the CRA forum it is clear that the supports are not the same as the LSWR ones.  The top rollers are simply pivoted on a bolt running across the top of the stool and there is no horizontal slot for them to run in.  There is, however a slight 'cox-comb' effect to the top as each side support projects slightly above the aforesaid bolt.  I therefore opted to omit part E and cut part A midway through the top set of holes.

 

To fit the stools I set my dividers at 16mm and marked a row of holes where the run was to go.  I then went along with a craft knife and made a cut at each mark at right angles to the track through the DAS slurry ground cover and into the Ply baseboard, just deep enough for the leg of a stool.  A stool was then fitted into each cut and aligned using the Mk1 human eyeball, adjusting the cuts where necessary.  The rods were then threaded in, any further adjustment needed made and the ends soldered to a small piece of sleeper strip.  One end goes into the boarding in front of the box and the other is at the baseboard joint.  Any of the cuts showing at the side of the stools was filled in by softening the DAS slurry with a little water and making it good.  Any gaps under the stools were similarly filled with some slurry by pulling the stool up slightly and putting a little under it before pushing it back down. 

 

The CR was very considerate of we modelers and boxed in the cranks etc.  One such box can be seen in the first two photos where a rod branches off to a turnout.

 

My cunning plan to disguise the joint between the baseboards is to have the compensators there, boxed in, of course, the box fitting over the joint and being removable for transit.  It will not be quite in the middle of the run, but since the far end disappears under a bridge, this should not be too noticeable.

 

The run was painted with two thin coats of a mix of Humbrol Nos 70 and 173, which I think are 'leather' and 'track dirt' respectively.  The challenge will be to mix the same colour for the other runs!

 

Point rodding #1.JPG

Point rodding #2.JPG

Point rodding #3.JPG

 

The down home signal has been moved a couple of MM to give room for the rods coming across from the box into the ten foot between the down loop and the down main.  You can just about see them behind the signal.  The box covers the cranks and there will be a (initially) 9 rod run going along the ten foot.

 

Jim


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#125 Caley Jim

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Posted 05 March 2018 - 21:10

Before tackling the big run down the ten foot between the Down Main and Down Loop, I decided to do the single rod run at the other end of this board.  This goes from the catch point on the up sidings to the associated turnout on the Up Main. I knew this would be a tricky one as it is up against the boundary wall of the Allanmuir Agricultural Supplies warehouse.  I have a habit of doing the hard bits first.  After that the rest is easy (or should be!).

 

In view of how small the tabs on the single rod stools are I used a No 11 scalpel blade to make the cuts, despite this most of the tabs didn't have much grip, but some DAS slurry took care of that.  Again there will be a boxed in compensator to disguise the baseboard joint.

 

Point rodding #4.JPG

 

Also fitted are the rods crossing over from the main run and the boarding over them.  The turnout in the foreground has passenger routes over it in both  facing directions, so it has a double FPL as was CR practice, hence the three rods going to it.

 

Jim


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