The Science of Eurosprinters (and Eurorunners)

The Science of Eurosprinters (and Eurorunners)

Postby 1216 025 » Sun Aug 16, 2009 10:01 am

G'day...

The last three weeks saw my fleet of modern H0 scale locomotives expanded by a total of three new units. I would have to mention that the event which triggered this wave of purchases was my having done a ride on a professional training simulator about a month ago - this simulator, as if by good fortune, having represented a Siemens ES 64 U2 electric engine, better known to many as the "Taurus", which happens to be my probably most favoured type of European locomotive. It might therefore not be a big surprise that, after this ride, I felt the strong need to have a model of this type in my collection - but don't ask me why I did not buy one earlier!

Checking around, however, I found that Roco - who I believe do the best Taurus model in H0 scale - do not carry a model of the ES 64 U2 type at this time - a black MRCE Dispolok engine in the "BosporusSprinter" version, fitted for several countries in Southern Europe and indeed Turkey having been announced for late this year. But they do have several variants of the more recent ES 64 U4 type available at this time, and as this, too, is a member of the "Taurus" family I thought it would do nicely as well. The question then was which of the available variants I might like to have!

However, perhaps I should first give you a brief overview of the Eurosprinter family history. Basically, things started with the Spanish class 252 engine which was first delivered in 1989 and which was, to some degree, related to the DB class 120.1 engine from the earlier 1980s. The Portuguese class LE5600 is another derivative of this design which would later be further developed into the Eurosprinter.
Then in 1992, Siemens presented the actual prototype for what was now called the Eurosprinter family of electric locomotives. This engine was given the DB class number 127 001 - the manufacturer's designation being ES 64 P, P of course meaning "prototype" - and, after basic trials were completed, used in regular Bundesbahn service with both passenger and freight services. The DB, which was preparing to merge with the former East German Deutsche Reichsbahn at that time, did not initially acquire any additional engines of this type, however. Only the Greek railways - OSE - ordered engines directly derived from the ES 64 P type, but adapted for 25 kV AC instead of 15 kV and with their maximum power reduced to 5,000 kW instead of the original 6,400. These engines, initially known as H ("eta") 561 through 566 and later reclassified as class 120, remain the only electric locomotives operated by OSE until this day - 24 additional units having been purchased in 1997. Externally, all engines derived from the ES 64 P look quite different from the later incarnations of the Eurosprinter family. The original ES 64 P or 127 001 was later put into the pool of Dispolok, a motive power leasing company initially owned by Siemens, but later sold to MRCE. It remains in use until this day and has been given a new livery only recently.

In 1994 the newly formed DB AG then ordered 195 units of a new kind of engine derived from the ES 64 P, but optimized for freight work and also known as the ES 64 F type. These locomotives, which were delivered between 1996 and 2001, were designated as class 152 and meant to fully replace the class 150 and 151 Co'Co' engines. Also, they were fitted with ETS, push-pull controls and all other facilities to operate passenger services, if required. However, with a top speed of 140 kph the only kinds of passenger services they would have been able to operate reasonably would have been regional trains. They were actually used in that role in the early phase of revenue service, but not very frequently as the effects of the DB AG having been split into separate divisions for long distance passenger traffic, regional traffic and freight were quickly becoming obvious - with each division largely keeping its engines to itself. Apart from the engines for DB Cargo, as the DB freight division was called at that time, two additional ES 64 Fs were built for the Dispolok pool, but these engines have since been sold to private freight operator ITL.

DB Cargo - who would later be renamed into Railion, Railion DB Logistics and now finally DB Schenker - were also planning to operate their 152s in Austria, which is basically not a problem as the railways of Austria and Germany share most of the fundamental technical properties, such as the 15 kV AC system, OHLE geometry or the PZB and LZB train protection systems. However, when the 152 was put into acceptance trials on the ?BB network it was claimed to exceed the permissible track forces and therefore denied its certification for Austria. Several railway engineers later doubted the validity of this argument, however, pointing out that older Co'Co' engines like the ?BB classes 1010 and 1110 produced similarly high track forces, but were never faulted for this, unlike the 152 which is a Bo'Bo' design.

Meanwhile, the ?BB themselves had concluded they, too, would have to largely renew their locomotive inventory. The initial idea was to procure large numbers of the Austrian-built class 1012 which, however, was considered to be both "over-engineered" and overpriced, and thus built in only three units. In the end, the ?BB would also turn to Siemens and Krauss-Maffei who offered a completely improved Eurosprinter design, beating ADtranz, Alsthom and Ansaldo-Breda in the process. Thus was born what would be known as the "Taurus" family of high performance multipurpose electric locomotives and considered one of the most visually pleasing designs to hit the rails in quite a long time. In the end the ?BB would order a total of 332 engines - fifty of those actually being 15 kV only units designated as class 1016 and 282 dual system units known as class 1116 and capable of running under both 15 and 25 kV AC. Actually, the number of the 1116s would have had to be even higher at 325 units, but a change in strategic planning required a multisystem engine capable of both AC and DC operation to be acquired.

However, the development of the 1016 and 1116, which are also known as the ES 64 U2 type, would also provide the DB with a ready solution to operate new generation electrics in Austria after all. Therefore, the last 25 152s were cancelled and the order converted into an equal number of ES 64 U2s, which were designated as class 182. Additional ES 64 U2 engines were also built for the Hungarian state railways M?V (ten units) as well as private operator GySEV (five units), there being known as class 1047, two engines for German freight operator MWB and, of course, sixty engines for the Dispolok pool. What should be noted, however, is that, strictly speaking, only the ?BB engines may be referred to as "Taurus" as this name is a registered trademark. The ES 64 U2 has 6,400 kW - though there is a "booster" mode with 7,000 kW available for a maximum of ten consecutive minutes which must be activated with a separate button on the driver's desk - and a top speed of 230 kph/143 mph. Strangely, M?V decided to order its 1047s without LZB equipment, meaning these engines are limited to 160 kph/100 mph in both Austria and Germany as higher speeds are permitted only while operating with LZB guidance.

Another locomotive from the Eurosprinter line which was built and delivered between 1999 and 2000 is the Danish EG 3100 which is basically a 15/25 kV dual voltage Co'Co' version of the ES 64 F or 152 and which was specifically built to handle freight services between Sweden and Germany across the Great Belt. The tunnel there has a maximum gradient of 15.6% and it was found that only a twelve wheeled engine could provide sufficient power to transit the tunnel with a 2,000 tonnes train even in the event of a bogie being disabled.

The next major step in the Eurosprinter development was the ES 64 F4 type first presented in 2003. As the designation says, this is a freight engine capable of operating under 15 and 25 kV AC as well as 3 and 1.5 kV DC, and with a top speed of 140 kph. 100 locomotives were ordered by the DB and designated as class 189, 18 - designated as Re 474 - by the SBB, though only twelve of these were accepted due to repeated delays during delivery; the remaining six engines having then been sold to Swedish TOC HectorRail (two engines), Impresa Ferroviaria Italiana (formerly known as Del Fungo Giera - three engines) and Nordcargo (one engine). Also, 95 engines were ordered for the Dispolok pool, the last of these being scheduled for delivery in 2010. However, ten of the initial 45 Dispolok units were sold on to Italian TOC RTC and German operator Lokomotion, each of these taking five engines. Also, DB Schenker sold ten engines to Dispolok and subsequently hired them back, though several of these former DBS units have since been hired on to other TOCs. Finally, German freight operator MTEG bought one engine and Romanian freight TOC Cargo Trans Vagon two.
As it would be impossible for one engine to carry all the different types of pantographs and train protection systems for all countries at once, the ES 64 F4/189 comes in several variants, each fitted for a specific combination of countries.

As I mentioned before, the ?BB had decided to buy a series of DC-capable engines based on the Eurosprinter design in the meantime - the class 1822 engine from several years before which had been meant to be capable of running in Austria, Germany and Italy having been a dismal failure. After collecting practical experience with a number of ES 64 F4s leased from Dispolok an order was then made for what became known as the "Taurus 3" - the ES 64 U4 type, basically a 189 with a Taurus-style body and high speed bogies with the so-called "HAB" drive and capable of 230 kph, rather than the nose-suspended motors on the ES 64 F4 which are good for only 140 kph. For this purpose the last 68 class 1116 engines were cancelled and converted into 50 units of the new type, designated as class 1216.
As with the ES 64 F4, the U4 comes in a number of variants, each equipped for a specific combination of countries. The following variants exist at this time:

  • ES 64 U4-A - certified for Austria, Germany and Italy at this time
  • ES 64 U4-B - certified for Austria, Germany, Italy and Slovenia
  • ES 64 U4-C - certified for Austria, Germany and the Czech Republic, certification for Slovakia pending
  • ES 64 U4-D - certified for Austria and Germany, certification for Poland pending
  • ES 64 U4-F - certified for Austria, Germany, Slovenia and Italy, certifications for Croatia, Hungary and Slovakia pending
  • ES 64 U4-G - certified for Austria and Germany only and actually lacking their DC equipment, which means they should more properly be referred to as a new kind of ES 64 U2


Aside from the 50 ?BB units, 32 engines have been bought by the Slovenian railways; ten by the Polish railways (PKP) which are to be designated as class EU 44; four by Arriva operated as class 183; two by Austrian freight and MOW operator RTS; three by Austro-Slovenian operator Adria Transport; two by Austrian freight operator LogServ; and one each by Austrian operators LTE, Salzburger Lokalbahn (SLB) and Wiener Lokalbahnen Cargo (WLC) as well as German operator mgw Service.

All ES 64 U4s have a continuous rated power of 6,000 kW (slightly less than the U2 as the transformer had to be built lighter in order to allow for the weight of the DC equipment and additional train protection packages) and a top speed of 230 kph/143 mph in Austria and Germany, 140 kph/87 mph in Italy and 160 kph/100 mph in Slovenia. The maximum tractive effort is 300 kN/67,443 lbf.

Even while production of the Taurus family was only getting under way, the ?BB realized it would also have to renew its inventory of diesel locomotives. For this purpose they eventually turned to Siemens once again, who then developed and built what would be known as the Eurorunner family of diesel-electric mainline engines. Initially, these engines could only be had with a Bo'Bo' wheel arrangement, but in recent times a Co'Co' variant is being offered as well. However, Siemens basically merged the Eurosprinter and Eurorunner product lines in the meantime, with the same basic bodywork being used for both electrics and diesel-electrics - much like Bombardier is doing with its TRAXX 2E line. The first engines to be based on this new, unified design are the Belgian class 18 and Portuguese class LE4700 electrics as well as the Lithuanian ER 20 LG diesel-electrics, which look quite different when compared to both the Taurus and the 189 design.

A total of 145 "classic" ER 20 engines was built for several operators in Austria and Germany. The ?BB have 100 of these engines, designated as class 2016 and carrying the protected name "Hercules" which, in a strict sense, may be used only for the ?BB engines. Other customers include Austrian operator STLB (Steierm?rkische Landesbahnen) with two engines; MRCE Dispolok with fifteen units, German operators Nord-Ostsee-Bahn with seven engines, Regentalbahn (an Arriva subsidiary) with twelve, and the Siemens company demonstrator. Also, five units were built for Hong Kong-based operator MTRCL, these engines being fitted with upgraded air conditioning and automatic couplers plus a number of additional modifications. All these engines belong to the ER 20 BU subtype, "U" meaning "universal" and indicating that these engines are fitted with ETS.
The rest of the lot belong to the ER 20 BF subtype, "F" meaning "freight." These engines are not fitted with ETS. Customers for this variant include Austrian operators RTS and LTE with three and two engines respectively, as well as German TOCs Pressnitztalbahn (PRESS) with two engines, Eisenbahnen und Verkehrsbetriebe Elbe-Weser (EVB) with four units, Osthannoversche Eisenbahnen (OHE) with three and Westf?lische Landeseisenbahn (WLE) with one unit.

All Bo'Bo' Eurorunners have a rated power output of 2,000 kW on the side of the prime mover, which is a 16 cylinder MTU 16 V 4000 R 41 unit operating between 600 and 1,800 rpm. Depending on whether or not ETS is fitted, the available power at the wheels amounts to 1,750 (without ETS) or 1,600 kW (with ETS). The maximum tractive effort is 235 kN/52,830 lbf and the top speed is 140 kph. The fuel capacity is 2,800 litres/616 UK gallons.

Been a lot of text until now, no? :lol: Well, I think it's on with the pictures now!

First up will be ?BB engine 1216 025. This model is Roco's item 62484, and some users on here will surely have an idea what this specific engine did in another guise...


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Wasn't it 1216 050 which set the 357 kph/222 mph speed record? :what Yes, it was, but 1216 050 and 1216 025 are actually the same engine :D . The engine has the works number 21136 and was first delivered in October 2005 to Siemens Transportation Systems. After setting its record the engine was sold to the ?BB and rebuilt into a normal ES 64 U4-A type, receiving its new number in the process. It was also given a new commemorative livery - which I think looks rather sharp 8) . Silver and black go together very well, if you ask me, and, together with the inscription on the body sides, provide a good and pleasantly understated reminder of the engine's performance, without looking flashy or otherwise obtrusive.



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The front is still very much Taurus-like, but some design changes have been implemented in the ES 64 U4 when compared to the U2. The U4 was fitted with LED headlights - like the ES 64 F4 - though the high beam lamps remain standard halogen units. Also, the centre light was relocated, now being placed above the windshield rather than below, which I think was originally meant to avoid blinding the driver when driving through fog. But for some reason or other it would seem that Siemens did not stick with this solution. Another item which was altered on the U4 is the handrail below the windshield, which was extended a bit more around the corners.
Two other noticeable details which can be seen from this perspective are the two engine numbers inscribed just above the windshield - E 190 025 above the driver's position and 1216 025 above the assistant's position. The former number is, to my knowledge, a concession to the Italian railway authorities who mandate that all electric engines must have a class number prefixed with an "E". Another item having to do with the engine numbers is that for some reason both the Austrian and German railways appear to be doing away with the check digit on the frontside numbers altogether. In recent months I've seen several engines, mostly 111s and 143s, where the check digit had been deleted, leaving only the class number and consecutive number.
The other detail I was meaning to point out, however, is the small red area at the upper edge of the buffer beam, right below the frontside panel. This, too, had to be applied by demand of the Italian network operator RFI as they require all engines meant to run in Italy to have at least a limited area of red on the fronts, which is to serve as a high-visibility area.



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There is a term in German railspeak for all the electrical stuff on the roof of electric engines: "Dachgarten" or "roof garden", which I think rather hits the nail on its head, especially on multisystem engines like the 1216. As with almost all Roco engines, the pantographs are amazingly fine and are, in fact, well suited for fitting them to other engines - even from other manufacturers, such as Fleischmann - which would otherwise be lacking in this optically vital area. The two outer pans are Siemens SBS 2T units with 1,950 mm wide heads used for Austria and Germany, while the inner two are meant for the Italian 3 kV DC system and have 1,450 mm wide heads with copper strips and (I think) forced graphite lubrication in order to reduce wear on both the pan head and the wire. In between, of course, are the AC and DC busbars - the large cylindrical object roughly in the centre of the roof being the vacuum circuit breaker. Also seen are the ventilation grilles for the rheostatic brake - which is normally used only during DC operation as DC networks cannot accept the same amount of recuperated energy as AC networks can. However, the electric brake is set up such that the regenerative mode is maxed out first, with the rheostats only being called upon if the regenerative brake cannot feed any additional power back into the grid. Finally, the horns are also located in between the roofside equipment.



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Close view of the inscriptions on the number 2 end. I can, of course, see the ?BB's reasoning behind using a very light colour for the lettering, but am a bit doubtful whether the inscriptions are sufficiently legible this way. The most important pieces of information inscribed here are, from left to right: minimum vertical hump radius of 250 metres; minimum curve radius of 90 metres; engine weight of 87 tonnes; braking weights: R+E 160 180 tonnes, R+E 168 tonnes, P+E 124 tonnes, R 111 tonnes, P 100 tonnes, G 80 tonnes and arresting brake weight of 36 tonnes; the trademarked "Taurus" logo; owner's inscription: ?BB Traktion; overall length of 19.58 metres and distance between bogie pivots of 9.90 metres; certification grid with entries for Austria (?BB), Germany (D) and Italy (I) and space for many more; braking inscriptions: brake setting "R" according to UIC norms (R inside the rhomboid), Knorr-Einheitsbremse with settings G, P and R, Electric brake and ("mit") direct brake valve ("Zusatzbremse"), disk brakes (encircled yellow "D") and electropneumatic brake, then some pieces of advice concerning the bogie brakes and associated optical brake condition indicators located immediately below the frame; and, finally, the type designation for this engine: ES 64 U4-A.



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And the remaining inscriptions towards the number 1 end: revision grid with the last completed overhaul which was finished on 23 June 2008 and the somewhat odd remark "km-abh.", meaning "dependent on mileage" - to be honest, I have never seen this sort of inscription before. The way I have only ever seen these revision grids filled out was the location of the last overhaul in the centre box and the corresponding date in the rightmost box. But anyway - the next major item is the engine number in both the Austrian and Italian format - with the Austrian number being preceded by 91, referring to an electric engine with a top speed of more than 100 kph/62 mph, and 81, indicating that this engine is registered in Austria. However, there are no suffixes like "A-?BB", which I believe should be present on all ?BB engines. You may also have noticed those smallish indications on the frame right above the wheelsets, like "1R", "2R" and so on. These simply indicate the number of the corresponding wheel in relation to the engine side. Funnily, while I have seen such indications on ICE sets before, I have not yet seen even the cab doors having been numbered!

Well, this was the first engine to pop out from the parcel, but there also was another one! As I had seen RTS engine 2016 905 on MOW work on my line last summer I had been hoping for Roco to do this variant eventually. Well, they did, and as I thought the price to be alright I ordered this one right along with 1216 025. So, here we go again...


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While RTS is a subsidiary of Austrian track builder Swietelsky I actually do not think their engines really look like MOW stock at all - though the colours do lend themselves rather well to their engines also shuttling the company's MOW machinery around. 2016 905 was delivered to RTS on 26 June 2007 and has the works number 21153. In the meantime RTS took delivery of two additional 2016s, these being numbered 906 and 907. The Roco model is item 62838, if you should want to get one yourself!



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Frontside view of the engine. As you can see here, the engine number is again lacking the check digit. The windshield wipers have to be manually fitted on this model, which I admit was a task which almost drove me mad as I needed at least 15 minutes per wiper to get the d**ned retaining pin to slide into the hole!



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And now for the inscriptions on this engine, beginning on the number 2 end. From left to right: engine weight of 80 tonnes; braking weights: R 120 tonnes (115 for Germany, but don't ask me why), P 72 tonnes and G 65 tonnes, as well as 20 tonnes for the arresting brake; minimum curve radius of 100 metres and minimum vertical hump radius of 250 metres; overall length of 19.28 metres and distance between bogie pivots of 10.36 metres; braking gear: "R" setting according to UIC norms, SW4 type brake valve with settings G, P and R, electric brake and direct brake valve, disk brakes and electropneumatic brake.



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The remaining inscriptions towards the number 1 end: revision grid with no data entered; engine number: 92 81 2016 905-9, where 92 indicates this engine as being a diesel locomotive with more than 100 kph top speed, and 81 as it being registered in Austria. However, I am still at loss as to what the "PZB: 951.595" number below the normal Austrian-formatted number means. I have seen Dispolok engines carrying DB style numbers like "182 9xx" and "189 9xx" for operation under control of the LZB protection system as this cannot handle numbers like "ES 64 U2-035" - but I have never seen separate PZB numbers before. I would have thought that the Austrians would have adapted their PZB gear to their four digit class numbers long ago - well. Anyway, further to the right is the certification grid which indicates this engine to be certified for Austria and Germany.
The shoe-like thingy below the bogie frame between the wheelsets is, of course, the PZB transmitter, which you will have seen on the 1216 as well.



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Naturally there is not as much to be seen on the roof of a diesel engine as on an electric. However, the boxy item in the recess to the left houses the cooling fans for the braking rheostats. Also note the horns, which are located above the cabs on the 2016, are actually pointing inwards, and I believe the 2016 to be the only engine I have seen thus far with this arrangement.

As some of you may remember, me and my girlfriend then went on vacation to Leipzig, and I did not forget to check up on the local model shops beforehand. It turned out one of them, conveniently located in the rather nice city centre, had a Roco 182 left in stock - the 182 being the German version of the Austrian 1116, as mentioned before. So, one afternoon I then popped into the store and - you guessed right - got hold of this very engine. It is one of Roco's initial releases of the 182 (item 63685) and will require some decals to give it its present appearance.


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Overall view of 182 001, which carries the works number 20298 and was delivered to DB Cargo in 2001. Like all 182s it is allocated to the Nuremberg depot. Strangely, although the 182 has a top speed of 230 kph/143 mph and thus is the fastest locomotive in the DB inventory it is almost exclusively used for freight work.
(As you may have noticed, my girlfriend has actually managed to sneak into the background... :lol: )


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As I mentioned before, there are a number of external differences between the ES 64 U2 and U4 types. I also forgot that another item which was not carried over from the U2 into the U4 is the horns being located behind the grille above the right-hand buffer, having been relocated onto the roof on the Taurus 3. By the way, the 1016 (15 kV only) is also referred to as the Taurus 1, the 1116 (15/25 kV dual voltage) being the Taurus 2. However, the numerals are often left out when talking about these engines in practice.



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The inscriptions on the side towards the number 2 end. Far as I know, when 182 001 was originally rolled out several smaller inscriptions which are present today had not yet been applied, so I would have to add these as decals as well.
Present here are the following bits of information: engine weight of 86 tonnes; braking weights: R+E 180 tonnes, P+E 100 tonnes, R 140 tonnes, P and G 67 tonnes each. Generally speaking, the "+E" braking weights may only be used for the brake force calculation if at least 16 wheelsets are present in the train and if all carriages are equipped with brake application accelerators, the "E" meaning that the electric brake force has been included into the respective braking weight. In those cases where the standard braking weights without the "E" must be used, however, it does not mean that the electric brake were disabled. As a matter of fact, the electric brake has a higher priority than the pneumatic brake, the latter being blended in only as required to ensure sufficient brake force. Of course, in the event of an electric brake failure the pneumatic brake, which then is the only one working, is sufficiently dimensioned to be able to bring the engine to a halt safely alone.
Continuing with the inscriptions, we see the braking gear indication: "R" setting according to UIC norms, Knorr-Einheitsbremse with settings G, P and R, electric brake and direct brake valve, disk brakes and electropneumatic brake; overall engine length of 19.28 metres (30 centimetres shorter than the 1216) and distance between bogie pivots of 9.90 metres. Located below the frame just ahead of the door and ladder are optical brake state indicators referring to the number 2 bogie (left), number 1 bogie (centre) and the arresting brake (right).
One other feature which was not carried over from the ES 64 U2 into the U4 and which can be seen here is the door arrangement. The U2 was designed with only one door per side which leads into the engine room rather than directly into the cab. I believe the idea here was to simplify the task of pressure-sealing the cabs for high speed running, as well as to eliminate a possible source of draught which might have annoyed the driver. However, I think it was safety concerns which led to the U4 being fitted with the standard arrangement of two doors per side again, enabling direct access to the cabs. Also, drivers complained that the absence of external cab doors made it difficult to operate the talk-back sets often installed by the trackside in stabling areas and depots for direct communication with the signalman without the need to use the radio. The ES 64 F4 also has this door arrangement.



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Not too much in the way of inscriptions towards the number 1 end - will have to check whether any inscriptions have been added here in the meantime as well. As you may be able to see, the revision grid is empty. 182 001 had its last overhaul completed at the Dessau repair works on 21 June 2007, so the grid would have to read "REV | LDX | 21.06.07".
In case you were wondering what the rounded rectangular panel to the rear of the cab is about - this is an escape hatch which can be opened from the inside only. The idea here was to enable the driver to quickly exit the cab in the event of an imminent collision or other danger, even though there are no external cab doors. I'm not sure how realistic it might be to expect the driver to get up from his seat, turn to the right rear of the cab, drop to his knees, pop open the hatch and then jump out, all in a matter of just a few seconds, though...



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The roofside equipment is far less extensive on the U2 than it is on the U4. Several of the ?BB 1116s would have been fitted with a third pantograph located towards the number 1 cab in their early years, this pantograph having a 2,060 mm wide head and having been meant for the Hungarian OHLE. However, the Hungarians have since adapted their overhead lines to match the Austrian and German geometries, so the separate Hungarian pan was no longer required. In recent times, however, those Dispolok U2s fitted as "BosporusSprinters" have had a third pan with a 1,600 mm head fitted as the Bulgarian and Turkish OHLE requires this head width. Also, those U2s fitted for operation in Switzerland (which now includes several ?BB engines slated for Railjet services) also have a third pan, with a 1,450 mm head in this case.



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And all three engines standing side by side...



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...plus a profile shot :D .



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And, finally, a direct comparison between the profiles of the ES 64 U4 and ER 20...



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...and the ES 64 U4 and U2. Actually, ES 64 U2s can operate in multiples with the U4 and F4 types, the ER 20 and indeed the older classes 1144 and 1142, although these are not based on three-phase technology at all.


And a handful of Youtube videos showing the three types from this posting in action...




1216 004 with the "Italy" promotional livery from the 2008 European football championship departing...




...and a driver doing a drag race with his 1216 8) .




Test ride with another 1216 on the new Dutch HSL.





1016 023 with the "Kyoto" promotional livery departing...




...and DBS 182 003 working some freight.




Cab ride on a 1116.





Early morning departure of an ?BB 2016 with a freight service.




Another ?BB 2016 having brought a special to Ljubljana - not much in the way of clag on this engine, I'm afraid! :lol:




...and a third one departing light.


I'm quite sure I will also try to get hold of a 189 eventually. When I do, I will amend this thread.

Well, hope I could provide you with some useful information!
You have been bamboozled!

Recent rail-related events:
* NEW: Railway and trams in Leipzig, 28 July till 11 August 2009 - an image gallery - now completed

Kind regards
Dominik
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Re: The Science of Eurosprinters (and Eurorunners)

Postby allegheny1600 » Fri Aug 21, 2009 12:39 am

Hi Dominik,
Many thanks indeed for such a comprehensive explanation of these fantastic Siemens locomotives, i always got confused when "Today Railways Europe" spoke about BR182's, 1216's and ES64's etc more or less in the same paragraph.
I've only really seen BR152's hauling freight through the Romantic Rhine region, i'd certainly love to see more of them!
I have a Heljan model of the Danish EG class Co-Co electric, it's certainly an impressive model (not Roco running quality though!) and there is a model of the Greek (OSE) H561/120 class locos available from Electrotren, who also do the Spanish (RENFE) and Portugese (CP) variants.
I believe there is a double unit loco modelled by Roco, that runs in Norway on the iron ore trains that is also based upon the Eurosprinter design?
Best regards,
John E.
"In the shuffling madness, of the locomotive breath,
Runs the all-time loser, headlong to his death,
He feels the piston scraping, Steam breaking on his brow,
Old Charlie stole the handle and, The train wont stop going,
No way to slow down,
No way to slow down,...."

I. Anderson. "Aqualung" 1971
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Re: The Science of Eurosprinters (and Eurorunners)

Postby Fosterboy » Fri Aug 21, 2009 1:52 am

Dominik,

I swear I'm learning more about the technicalities of modern European locomotives from your posts here than I have from magazines and books. These are a generation of traction that haven't yet found a place in my collection, as my focus is the late 1990s- a 152 is about as modern as would fit in. Still, when the collection is more complete I expect that there will be more up to date models joining the ranks. Thanks to you I feel I actually know what I'm looking at!

Cheers
Regards

Rich

M?rklin Model Railway Club, Wellington, NZ

Dr Pepperami - What's the Wurst that could happen?
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Re: The Science of Eurosprinters (and Eurorunners)

Postby Dutch_Master » Fri Aug 21, 2009 2:26 am

allegheny1600 wrote:I believe there is a double unit loco modelled by Roco, that runs in Norway on the iron ore trains that is also based upon the Eurosprinter design?

It is: the Swedish (not Norwegian) MTAB/LKAB has 9 sets of these locos based on the BR185 from DBAG by ADtranz. Pics: http://www.railfaneurope.net -> click to enter, then Pictures (top menu), select the Swedish flag (blue/yellow, marked SE) then Private -> MTAB. And while you're there, check out other countries you'd fancy ;) For even more, google for IORE Wiki article
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Re: The Science of Eurosprinters (and Eurorunners)

Postby 1216 025 » Fri Aug 21, 2009 6:27 am

As Dutch_Master said, the IORE is an ADtranz design, and thus turned into a Bombardier product when ADtranz was bought up. Actually, it does carry the manufacturer's designation as TRAXX H80 AC, even though it was actually ordered and developed before 1999, when the first 185s appeared. As such, it doesn't have anything to do with the Eurosprinter.

allegheny1600 wrote:I have a Heljan model of the Danish EG class Co-Co electric, it's certainly an impressive model (not Roco running quality though!) and there is a model of the Greek (OSE) H561/120 class locos available from Electrotren, who also do the Spanish (RENFE) and Portugese (CP) variants.



The Heljan EG sure is an interesting model :) . One thing you might consider correcting on it is that the driver's desk is located towards the left side of the cab, whereas it should be to the right.
Electrotren also did the ES 64 P in the yellow and silver original Dispolok livery, but this one has sold out in the meantime, unfortunately. However, far as I remember the Electrotren model is based on the shorter frame of the actual ES 64 P/OSE 120 with 19.28 metres, whereas the Spanish 252 (and I believe the Portuguese LE5600 as well) have been built to a length of 20.38 metres. On the other hand, the Mehano model, which was also used to represent all these types, was based on the longer Iberian engines and thus could not really represent the shorter ES 64 P. Fundamentally, from what I've been hearing I think the Electrotren model is a lot better overall than the Mehano one.
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Re: The Science of Eurosprinters (and Eurorunners)

Postby DaveGeo » Wed Sep 02, 2009 7:22 pm

1216 025 wrote: .... First up will be ?BB engine 1216 025. This model is Roco's item 62484, and some users on here will surely have an idea what this specific engine did in another guise...

Image

Wasn't it 1216 050 which set the 357 kph/222 mph speed record? :what Yes, it was, but 1216 050 and 1216 025 are actually the same engine :D . The engine has the works number 21136 and was first delivered in October 2005 to Siemens Transportation Systems. After setting its record the engine was sold to the ?BB and rebuilt into a normal ES 64 U4-A type, receiving its new number in the process.


As usual Dominik, another one of your dedicated and detailed expose's of European MPU design and history - I hope you're putting all this in an e-book (almost a la your Leipzig pdf - see your pm).

Anyway, I had to be reeled in with your Taurus and Vmax 357 comments, so here's my previous picture of my ES 64 U4-A in the Class 1216 Vmax 357 - World's fastest Locomotive post - just for comparison photos:

Image

But I have a question: in your commentary you mentioned that 1216 050 was rebuilt into a normal U4-A - are you able to highlight what the rebuild elements were? In the Siemens publicity document it says "it was set on the new Ingolstadt – Nuremberg high speed line during a normal gap in regularly scheduled 300 km/h ICE® train service and without any modifications to the locomotive". I know they had to add speed measurement devices to 2 axles and the pantograph. Elsewhere, they also mention it was a series production model.

Just wondered, do you know what changes they made in the workshop - before repainting it?
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Re: The Science of Eurosprinters (and Eurorunners)

Postby 1216 025 » Wed Sep 02, 2009 9:28 pm

DaveGeo wrote:Just wondered, do you know what changes they made in the workshop - before repainting it?


Not in complete detail, but the engine did have a couple of modifications applied to it before the record. Among these was the removal of the snow plough and windshield wipers on the cab end which was not coupled to the measuring car - the thing with the plough having had to do with the idea of allowing more air circulation around the traction motors. Another modification was the temporary reduction of the maximum brake cylinder pressure to avoid overheating in case of an emergency braking from very high speed. Also, the overhead voltage was slightly increased over the normal 15 kV, which I believe necessitated a modification to the circuit breaker so as to not falsely cut out due to "excess" voltage. I do not know the normal operating range on the 1216's circuit breaker, but on the 1116 it is between 10.5 and 18.5 kV when operating in 15 kV mode, and 17.5 to 29 kV when in 25 kV mode. Finally, the onboard train protection equipment had to be disabled as neither PZB nor LZB would have allowed the engine to accelerate beyond the maximum permissible speed.

I also think 1216 050, as originally built, was not actually certified to run in Italy at the time of the record.
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Re: The Science of Eurosprinters (and Eurorunners)

Postby ShedcombeUponFrome » Thu Sep 03, 2009 6:11 am

Dominik,

Thanks so much for your thorough essay. Much appreciated.

We have had 1216 050 on tests twice, on the HSL Zuid ( High Speed Line South ) from Amsterdam to Belgium.
In 2006 it was in plain ?BB red with the advertising text " Borderless - Powerful - Fast , The first European High-Speed Locomotive , Siemens "
In 2007 it came in it's grey 357km/h record livery.

If you Google for HSL and Taurus, you'll find the info easily.

Regards, Michel
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Re: The Science of Eurosprinters (and Eurorunners)

Postby 1216 025 » Thu Sep 03, 2009 6:17 am

I might have mentioned it before, but I once did see 1216 050 on the road. However:

* I had not had any knowledge it would be in the area that day,
* I subsequently didn't have my camera with me,
* which means that even if I had had the camera with me that day I would not have had any time to position myself for a good shot,
* plus it was rainy and windy that day, which means lighting conditions the little camera I had back then would hardly have been able to handle.

:wall :wall :wall
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Re: The Science of Eurosprinters (and Eurorunners)

Postby Dutch_Master » Thu Sep 03, 2009 2:09 pm

?BB 1216 050 at Hoofddorp HSL, 21-7-06
img_0235.jpg
?BB 1216 050 at Hoofddorp HSL, 21-7-06
img_0240.jpg
?BB 1216 050 at Hoofddorp HSL, 21-7-06

Taken from moving trains with very dirty windows :? I did see it later, in it's "Weltrecord" livery at the HSL yard last year, but I didn't take photos of it then.
img_0545 (Modified in GIMP Image Editor).jpg
RD 189 074-8 with sister in Leiden, 24-11-08

RD (now DBS) 189 074-8 with sister in Leiden, 24-11-08 Unusual, as these sets pull heavy coal trains from Amsterdam Westhaven to Germany. Finding a double-traction set w/o it's train, especially at this station, is remarkable.
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Re: The Science of Eurosprinters (and Eurorunners)

Postby 1216 025 » Thu Sep 03, 2009 2:18 pm

Dutch_Master wrote:RD (now DBS) 189 074-8 with sister in Leiden, 24-11-08 Unusual, as these sets pull heavy coal trains from Amsterdam Westhaven to Germany. Finding a double-traction set w/o it's train, especially at this station, is remarkable.


A few days ago I read that 18 DBS 189s are to be fitted with automatic couplers next year in order to handle ore trains without having to change engines at the German border - the only DBS mainline engines fitted with automatic couplers (or "AK", as most German railfans say) at this time being several of the older 140s and 151s. In fact, those "ore bombers", as they are usually called, headed by a pair of 151s, are hugely popular motives for spotters!
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Re: The Science of Eurosprinters (and Eurorunners)

Postby Dutch_Master » Thu Sep 03, 2009 2:36 pm

Dominik, note that RN/DBS have a number of bulk-freights: coal from Rotterdam (Europoort) to Germany, coal from Amsterdam (Westhaven) to Germany and iron ore from Rotterdam (Europoort) to Germany. Only the latter uses these "AK" sets, the coal trains have regular, standard couplers. It's unlikely the entire RD/DBS fleet of 189's are converted to AK's. Also, the loading facilities at these ports are diesel-only, so at least some RN/DBS 6400's require a similar treatment, or the current practice of coupler-conversion cars remains.
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Re: The Science of Eurosprinters (and Eurorunners)

Postby 1216 025 » Thu Sep 03, 2009 3:14 pm

Dutch_Master wrote:Dominik, note that RN/DBS have a number of bulk-freights: coal from Rotterdam (Europoort) to Germany, coal from Amsterdam (Westhaven) to Germany and iron ore from Rotterdam (Europoort) to Germany. Only the latter uses these "AK" sets, the coal trains have regular, standard couplers. It's unlikely the entire RD/DBS fleet of 189's are converted to AK's. Also, the loading facilities at these ports are diesel-only, so at least some RN/DBS 6400's require a similar treatment, or the current practice of coupler-conversion cars remains.



Yes - as I said, only eighteen 189s will be converted to automatic couplers as per current plans. However, 31 of those 189s not yet fitted for operation in the Netherlands will have the necessary equipment added till the end of this year, which means that 58 of the 90 DBS engines will then be able to operate there.

Just out of curiosity, which engines are used for these coal and ore trains on the Dutch section of their runs? I only ever saw images of 6400s working the coalers, and I believe I once read that the 1600s, though basically capable of multiple heading, are rarely ever used in this setup due to the 1.5 kV DC system not being sufficiently powerful to feed enough power for two of these engines at once.

Oh, and one more for us Taurus aficionados :D ... Engine 1047 504 of Hungarian operator GySEV has recently been given a rather sharp promotional livery commemorating Austrian composer Joseph Haydn, and now looks like this: http://bahnbilder.warumdenn.net/9307.htm . Fittingly, Roco, who appear to have co-sponsored the livery, have just announced this very engine as an addition to their new releases for the winter season. Definitely a must-have for me! :thup
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Re: The Science of Eurosprinters (and Eurorunners)

Postby DaveGeo » Thu Sep 03, 2009 10:46 pm

1216 025 wrote:.... the engine did have a couple of modifications applied to it before the record. Among these was the removal of the snow plough and windshield wipers on the cab end which was not coupled to the measuring car - the thing with the plough having had to do with the idea of allowing more air circulation around the traction motors. ...


Thanks for clarifying that. Interestingly, found this image, which shows the snow plough and wiper alterations. In the full size image, the loco looks a bit worse for wear - although I've always liked the distinctive set of 10 corporate logos on the body side.
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Re: The Science of Eurosprinters (and Eurorunners)

Postby Dutch_Master » Fri Sep 04, 2009 1:00 am

1216 025 wrote:Just out of curiosity, which engines are used for these coal and ore trains on the Dutch section of their runs? I only ever saw images of 6400s working the coalers, and I believe I once read that the 1600s, though basically capable of multiple heading, are rarely ever used in this setup due to the 1.5 kV DC system not being sufficiently powerful to feed enough power for two of these engines at once.

The RD 189 are used for the Amsterdam coal trains, the Rotterdam trains (coal and ore) are the domain of the RN 6400. These RN 6400's are especially equiped with a "Deutschland Pakett": Indusi/LZB, removal of fauling parts (armrests on the cab) and some other items I don't know about I suppose. I'm not exactly sure about the numbers, but IIRC 6491-6520 are allowed on DB track.

As for the 1600, these are indeed capable of double traction, but as you've said correctly, the power supply isn't capable to handle that. The reason the more powerfull NS-R 1700 are allowed in a consist is that these are automatically limited once another set has coupled (even if that's a mDDM set, which has half the power of the 1700). If the 1600's had such limiters on board, their double traction would have been allowed. In theory, the RN and ACTS 1600's are still capable of being used in the DDM-1 push-pull sets.

Hint: http://www.rolandrail.net/div/index_e.htm and http://www.rolandrail.net/div/index_d.htm ;)
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Re: The Science of Eurosprinters (and Eurorunners)

Postby OgaugeJB » Fri Sep 04, 2009 1:26 am

These models are absolutely stunning... too small for my tastes, but still appreciably attractive, and such good detail on R-T-R stock !! :thup

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Re: The Science of Eurosprinters (and Eurorunners)

Postby 1216 025 » Fri Sep 04, 2009 5:11 am

DaveGeo wrote:In the full size image, the loco looks a bit worse for wear - although I've always liked the distinctive set of 10 corporate logos on the body side.



The missing snow plough really does spoil the appearance of the engine, if you ask me. As if somebody had knocked out the lower front teeth of another person, or something like that :shock: .


Dutch_Master wrote:As for the 1600, these are indeed capable of double traction, but as you've said correctly, the power supply isn't capable to handle that. The reason the more powerfull NS-R 1700 are allowed in a consist is that these are automatically limited once another set has coupled (even if that's a mDDM set, which has half the power of the 1700). If the 1600's had such limiters on board, their double traction would have been allowed. In theory, the RN and ACTS 1600's are still capable of being used in the DDM-1 push-pull sets.



Yes, I remember the 1700s had a couple of improvements fitted to their traction circuits. Wasn't there also something about the inverters on the 1600s producing excessive interference in some situations when operating in double traction, thereby fouling signalling circuits?
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Re: The Science of Eurosprinters (and Eurorunners)

Postby DaveGeo » Fri Sep 04, 2009 9:02 am

1216 025 wrote: The missing snow plough really does spoil the appearance of the engine, if you ask me. As if somebody had knocked out the lower front teeth of another person, or something like that :shock: .


Absolutely agree and hopefully there weren't any swarms of bluebottles and moths when they ran hi-speed with no wipers :mrgreen:
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Re: The Science of Eurosprinters (and Eurorunners)

Postby 1216 025 » Fri Sep 04, 2009 6:39 pm

Just to give you an idea of how different liveries can alter the appearance of the very same engine - here are links to three photos of the ES 64 P or 127:

Original livery of magenta and silver with grey frame

Initial Dispolok livery with the magenta having been replaced by yellow

Current MRCE Dispolok livery - but don't ask me what the H this pink high-vis area below the windshield is supposed to be about :shock: . Far as I know this high-vis panel is a silvery grey on the number 1 end, though.
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