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Bits and Pieces - Hornby Britannia Miscellany


Silver Sidelines

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Matters have moved on since my recent Post detailing the arrival of the Diamond Jubilee Britannia (R3094).

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The donor – Hornby William Wordsworth R2563

Firstly a view of the model that was to provide the tender with the Late Crest. At the time of writing my last post there were issues with William Wordsworth. I would give it a new identity with a tender with an early emblem and at a suitable time I would sell it.

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After recovering the white roof, R2563 Left R3094 Right

Perhaps I should have attempted to strip the white paint off the roof of Britannia R3094? My first attempts at repainting were not altogether successful. As the paint dried the rivet detail began to appear through the new paint as a pattern of white dots. I would start again. This time I over coated the whole of the white roof area with Humbrol matt black paint. When this had dried the central area was given a second coat of matt black and the sides above the windows were coated with Humbrol GWR green. Now nearly three weeks later it is still looking nearly very good.

I hadn’t compared Britannia (R3094) with any other models but placing it next to William Wordsworth (R2563) highlighted a difference in the size of the sliding hatches on the roof. I have searched the web for pictures of cab roofs without success. Which one is correct? Are they both correct? Did British Railways change the design of the cab roofs on the later engines?

In my previous Post I published a picture by Nigel kendall of the front of 70000 Britannia. Nigel has suggested that railway modellers might also be interested in another of his pictures, showing the cab – but not unfortunately the cab roof!

Where is all this leading? My researching into the history of various ‘Britannias’ is suggesting that where engines received new smoke deflectors to replace the ‘dangerous deflectors’ (with the handrails) the deflectors were changed after or at the same time as the tender received a Late Crest. William Wordsworth has replacement smoke deflectors and as such should only be paired with a tender with Late Crest. I would keep it that way.

What about 70000 Britannia? Returning to Derek Dean’s notes Britannia is recorded as gaining a Late Crest in 1958, new deflectors in 1959 and a speedometer in 1960. The Hornby model R3094 (with or without white roof) is thus either representative of the engine in preservation – when it should additionally be fitted with an air compressor inside the one of the smoke deflectors – or in pre 1958 days when it would not have had a speedometer or overhead warning plates.. As to my 1960s layout – I shall bide my time and enjoy the model for how it might have been!

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Compensating for old age

If I was keeping William Wordsworth there were several jobs to attend to. A number of bits had dropped off. How best to reattach these small parts? I would use Blu-Tack to help me hold the smaller items whilst I introduced a drop of Butanone from a tiny paint brush to make the joint.

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Attaching a lamp iron

There was a more fundamental problem with William Wordsworth – it didn’t run smoothly. It had a stiff point - I deduced it had a cracked drive gear.

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Replacement gear left, cracked gear right

Why a cracked drive gear and not just faulty quartering? Observing the movement of the engine showed that the stiffness did not occur at the same point for each revolution of the driving wheels but corresponded to something like one and quarter revolutions – so obviously there was something wrong in the engine’s drive train not directly connected with the wheels.

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Hornby Britannia Chassis – deconstructed

As shown above, the drive gear is buried deep within the Hornby chassis. Luckily Hornby have used screws to hold everything together. It is a straightforward task to tunnel down into the chassis and to replace the gear wheel. Ideally the motor should be lifted clear. This is helped by carefully peeling the wires off the metal chassis where they are attached with black rubbery glue. If this is done carefully the wires can be reattached on completion using the original glue.

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Hornby William Wordsworth R2563 and Britannia ex R3094 with repainted roof

Finally a view of renovated William Wordsworth and Britannia as might have been in the early 1960s if it had not had its ‘dangerous deflectors’ replaced.

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  • RMweb Gold

The few photo's I can find showing the cab roof ventilators, show the wider type, but knowing the number of modifications the class went through, it maybe correct.

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  • RMweb Gold

Thanks - I do just wonder if Hornby got it wrong first time round.

 

Regards

 

Ray

Having found a picture of Williiam Wordsworth (on google) showing the roof vents, they are wrong.

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Thanks TBG

Having found a picture of Williiam Wordsworth (on google) showing the roof vents, they are wrong.

I am wondering if you found the Peter Wilcox picture - certainly looks as though the ventilators on 70030 should be wider as on the Hornby model of 70000.

Regards

Ray

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  • RMweb Gold

Yes that's the photo in question. I'm wondering if any of the other R25xx releases of the Brit have the same problem

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Oh thanks for that,

 

Well looking at pictures of Hornby Models I have owned I would say that Apollo and NRM Oliver Cromwell have the wrong size cab ventilators.

 

There must be a thread somewhere, I cannot think tha it has gone unnoticed for so long!

 

Regards

 

Ray

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  • RMweb Gold

I just checked the Apollo donor (which became Ariel) and the roof ventilator's definitely smaller than that on the Clive of India donor (Thomas Hardy) that is currently on the workbench.

 

It never got mentioned in any of the reviews which was odd for a clanger (from Hornby) and I wouldn't go starting a thread on it now, as they (Hornby) have quietly fixed it.

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Thanks (TBG)

 

Yes after some further research - Clans McGregor and McLeod, and Brit William Shakespeare all have the larger (correct) ventilators.  Rather amusing that the usual suspects have not noticed.   There are a lot of detailed differences amongst the different models some of which are rather clever - William Shakespeae has the original split front steps which had been replaced by the time it arrived on the West Coast main Line - even though it was 1964 before it got its Late Crest..

 

I shall not be complaining, especially when I still use 16.5mm Code 100 track!

 

Regards

 

Ray

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  • RMweb Gold

Another blooper I spotted is the box Clive of India comes in - the overhead picture quite clearly shows the earlier/narrower ventilator - the models is correct lol

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Nice one

 

Thanks

 

Ray

 

PS The picture on the box for Shakespeare also shows narrow ventilators whilst the model is correct.

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Thanks Chris

.......great idea of yours

I think  it was my wife's Blu-Tack.  So perhaps not all my idea.

 

Regards

 

Ray

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Hello Ray, being a Britannia fanatic I gave up finding faults with the Hornby models as there are just too many variations in real life to accurately model them all. I have just accepted minor detail differences and added odd bits if I thought they looked more like a photo of the real thing, such as battery boxes. I did change the front bogies of all my earlier models for the later ones but resisted changing the cylinders as the costs would become too much. I have 28 of the locos with 2 specials on order from Hornby concessions. I am sure that you have seen the fantastic articles on David Heys website  http://www.davidheyscollection.com/page90.htm and pages 91 & 92.

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Hello Vespa

Hello Ray, being a Britannia fanatic I ..

 

Perhaps I too am a Britannia fanatic.  I do think the latest Hornby models are amongst the best Ready to Run models made to date.  To my mind they look good, there is a lot of intricate detail and they have great haulage power.  I don't have anywhere near 28 types - just a selection of those that might have been around in 1961.

 

The Britannia models, or more correctly their spare parts, have also been a useful source of bits for improving Duke of Gloucester.

 

The David Heys collection is most interesting.  I referred to it in some of my other Blogs.  There seems to be a problem with the link that you have posted.  This one seems better.

 

Speak again

 

Regards

 

Ray

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