Jump to content
Image restoration from pre-May 2021 continues and may take an indefinite period of time.

GWR horse-drawn station bus


Mikkel

2,630 views

 Share

I’ve built a GWR horse-drawn station bus using a modified and detailed P&D Marsh kit.

 

 001.jpg.72d7bc80f99d9ac70be5bdfbc5ddf4d9.jpg

 

A colourized postcard showing omnibuses in the station forecourt at Minehead. A perusal of period photos suggests that the outside seating wasn’t necessarily the last choice option – on sunny days at least!

 

 

 

002.jpg.92903be9b758528a9d8ea147b9c05c8f.jpg

 

The forecourt at Teignmouth. Lettering on the door shows the fare and “A. Harvey (?), Proprietor”. Many horse-drawn station bus services were operated by individual entrepreneurs, nearby fashionable hotels, or local agents for the railway companies. Actual GWR-owned station buses certainly existed but were, I suspect, a minority.

 

 

 

003.jpg.35179362dbaf3a5486c68275aaf1349e.jpg

 

Old and new at Helston. The GWR’s first motor-driven road service was introduced at Helston in 1903, signalling the beginning of the end for horsedrawn omnibuses. The horse-drawn bus on the right served a local hotel.

 

 

 

 004.jpg.a4cb159933e8250c70fef7d4f2b4ff6c.jpg

 

Phillip Kelley’s two volumes on GWR road vehicles feature a small but useful selection of photo and drawings of GWR horsedrawn buses. Online, a couple of rather interesting GWR omnibuses can be found here (scroll down). An agent-operated GWR service can be seen on the Fairford pages here. For non-GWR omnibuses, Gail Thornton’s website is interesting.

 

 

 

005.jpg.b978de9750a3a062904b8dc4f3535b66.jpg

 

The P&D Marsh kit is a fairly simple affair but does represent an actual prototype built by the GWR in 1894. There's a Swindon drawing of it in Kelley’s “Great Western Road Vehicles Appendix”. Towards the end of the build I realised that I had overlooked an actual photo of the vehicle in Kelley’s main volume (“Great Western Road Vehicles” p.29). 

 

 

 

006.jpg.bc6e82904f0b0566717ea0380abbc85a.jpg

 

Assembly of the body leaves you with somewhat unsightly corners, as Mike also commented in his build back in 2013.

 

 

 

007.jpg.d85a3d96dedaa7d3841545c1c95cd917.jpg

 

Repeated applications of filler and sanding helped, followed by primer.

 

 

 

008.jpg.e3b77e94f9687c935f1047a97a600bf2.jpg

 

The basic components result in a reasonable overall representation of the original vehicle. 

 

 


 009.jpg.7837489760213ce8c546acfb8cf85897.jpg

 

Bringing it to this stage was a fairly quick exercise, but I decided to add some detailing.

 

 

 

 009B.jpg.22c991b73a69d87dccf441e866f54ff7.jpg

 

First step was some simple seating and glazing. The interior may or may not have been more lavish, but with the roof on very little is visible. 

 

 

 

010.jpg.209e5900a7e64fc36ef56e96c112962b.jpg

 

The kit’s roof casting is rather thick and does not reflect the pattern on the prototype. A replacement was made by laminating two layers of thin styrene, the top layer being a grid pattern drawn up in Inkscape and printed on my Silhouette.

 

 

 

011.jpg.a4bae153cb185345fc64216299ee8bf0.jpg

 

This was fixed with superglue, with temporary holes to allow the fumes to escape so they don’t frost the glazing.

 

 

 

012.jpg.cd9d4d3405972ed60d639c6195245eda.jpg

 

Luggage rails were fitted using 0.5 mm straight brass wire. Later I removed the front rail, as I discovered that the prototype didn’t have it. Same thing can be seen on some other omnibuses. Forward-sliding luggage not a problem on slow-breaking vehicles?

 

 

 

 012B.jpg.026f5034865f541a95eb8f15cab15dc9.jpg

 

The drawing and photo show what initially looks like a ladder at the rear. Closer inspection shows it to be three vertical rails with no apparent rungs. My best guess is that they are guard-/guiderails for raising and lowering heavy luggage to and from the roof without damaging the sides. Unless anyone knows better? Anyway, I fitted them using more brass wire. Also seen is the rear passenger step. The one provided in the kit is rather crude and doesn't match the drawing, so I made a simple replacement. The step could be folded down and away for stowage during transport.

 

 


 013.jpg.91c53ff889164b3320080668b83327bd.jpg

 

Discovery of the prototype photo led to some unpleasant surprises. I had overlooked horisontal bolections along the sides and ends, so they were retrofitted using thin wire. There are also what looks like ventilation louvres above the windows (or rainstrips?), these were indicated using thin strips of styrene. 

 

 


 014.jpg.e3086d4bd71cfcf392d48ad55586366a.jpg

I fashioned a pair of coach lamps using old loco lamps from the scrap box, fitted with bits from my tin of watchmakers’ spares. No particular prototype, just a nod to a certain type seen in some photos.

 

 

 

015.jpg.629f3fafb5a8d0785cc8a9df632038a7.jpg

 

Lettering and insignia will have to wait. The prototype photo shows the vehicle in factory finish in 1894, with sans-serif “Great Western Railway” below the windows in quite a small font size (smaller than on goods cartage vehicles), and a simplified garter behind the wheels. My printer can’t do such small lettering to a satisfying standard, so I’ll leave it unlettered until I find one that can.

 

 

 

016.jpg.f59fbefabdbe9e93689afbec263fc84b.jpg

 

The bus will be parked in the station forecourt at Farthing, with passengers outside. So I decided to add some luggage. The prototype photo shows leather straps (or similar) fitted to the luggage rails, so I painted some thin masking tape to imitate this. 

 

 

 

017.jpg.b4091c63079e7dcae68e961e6735dc0d.jpg

 

I'm not sure about the principles for how luggage was packed on omnibus rooves. Photos suggest pragmatic solutions.

 

 

 

018.jpg.b21d62a57d04ecafbebf3b5daeb31553.jpg

 

I replaced the horse in the kit. I first painted up the mare on the left, but decided it was more of a goods type. So an exchange was made with the pretentious type on the right. Both are from Dart Castings.

 

 

 

019.jpg.788920ebea33e5605d00d530fa9f3bea.jpg

 

I normally go with matt varnish for my horse-drawn vehicles, but couldn't resist a satin finish in this case. 

 

 

 

020.jpg.7ccd8458851a3660ceac49522391e469.jpg

 

I'm pondering my choice of driver. Current offerings aren't that good, so will probably modify a seated passenger. No reins, too impractical with my current layout arrangements.

 

 

 

 021.jpg.313ed575034d4b4bffd8457dea146ba5.jpg

So that's yet another horse-drawn vehicle for Farthing. Good thing I've got a big stable block! There are plans afoot for an early motor bus, but that's another story.

 

 

Edited by Mikkel

  • Like 19
  • Agree 1
  • Informative/Useful 1
  • Craftsmanship/clever 34
  • Round of applause 5
 Share

82 Comments


Recommended Comments



  • RMweb Gold
ChrisN

Posted (edited)

1 hour ago, Simond said:


 

perhaps more up to date, at least on the weights, 83.6 kg for men and 70.2 kg for women.  Assuming equal numbers, that would be 6.5 couples per ton.  Or, if you prefer, 12 men or 14.25 women to the ton.

 

 

https://www.google.co.uk/url?sa=t&rct=j&q=&esrc=s&source=web&cd=&ved=2ahUKEwjq0fqNtLH1AhWClFwKHeQrAyMQFnoECAoQAw&url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.bbc.co.uk%2Fnews%2Fuk-11534042&usg=AOvVaw3aH9rsMfO0sFl8JPW9VD6_

 

 

 

Interesting.  The standard man in Radiation Protection is still 70kg.  Still, it is not my problem now.

Edited by ChrisN
  • Informative/Useful 1
Link to comment

A beautifully done model, Mikkel. I have been thinking about buying the kit myself, so seeing how you've done it has come along at just the right time!

  • Like 1
  • Thanks 1
Link to comment
  • RMweb Gold

Many thanks Dana. Would be nice to see you build one. Let me know if I can help with drawings/photos. 

 

These horse-drawn vehicles really are addictive, I've had to force myself away to get on with other things!

  • Like 1
  • Thanks 1
Link to comment
  • RMweb Gold

Hi Mikkel,

 

Good to see an something from the latest edition of "Horse Drawn Weekly":)  Beautifully modelled, I particularly like the roof rails and luggage.

 

BW

 

Dave

  • Like 1
  • Thanks 1
Link to comment
3 hours ago, Mikkel said:

...These horse-drawn vehicles really are addictive, I've had to force myself away to get on with other things!

I agree - I'm doing a lot of reading at present, with future modelling in mind.  It's a fascinating world of splinter bars, swingles, futchells, and lots of other mysterious paraphernalia.

 

Incidentally I read that the raised box 'seat' for the driver is usual, with a lower seat sometimes provided for a passenger to ride alongside - this appears to be the correct configuration for the horse bus.

 

Mike

  • Like 2
Link to comment
5 hours ago, MikeOxon said:

Incidentally I read that the raised box 'seat' for the driver is usual, with a lower seat sometimes provided for a passenger to ride alongside - this appears to be the correct configuration for the horse bus.

The driver's seat is often raised and wedge-shaped, tilting forwards.  One adopts a position which is more upright, more like perching on a bar stool.  It enables you to put more pressure on your feet which helps controlling the horse(s).  I did a bit of driving some years ago.  If I had the space I would do it again.

Edited by davidbr
  • Thanks 1
  • Informative/Useful 2
Link to comment

Mikkel.  Your work has often been described as 'inspirational' and for once, I have been inspired actually to do something.  I have had this omnibus part-made for some time but your post here has got me going.

 

The kit is very similar to yours but I am not sure of it's origin as there are differences.  The roof is cast in the checked pattern which I filed down and filled the holes with some paint to reduce the chunky look.  The two mouldings around the waist are cast on my kit.  I can't remember the corner joints as I had already made and painted the model.  

 

However, I have aded the railings around the top and added a couple of small rollers of brass micro-tube at the top of the luggage hoist; there is a rail around the driver's seat; I have painted a faint gold lining on the mouldings and added 'Great Western Railway'.  The latter I culled from a photo of a cast sign, bumped the resolution up to 300dpi then reduced it to 1mm tall and printed it on ivory coloured paper.  I have coloured the tyres with an HB pencil, a tip I was given recently and to get the silver in to the lamps I used a very small burr.

 

The horse is temporary, just for the photos.

 

I apologise for the photos.  I just cannot take a decent one at the moment, whatever I do.  Perhaps it is the poor winter light but I am more inclined to my ineptitude.

 

Thank you, Mikkel.

 

Station-Bus_S2725.jpg.397f9cad67069aa34e3f46425b2abf2c.jpgStation-bus_S2726.jpg.db9886a312ba730cbe4d1d3d547af682.jpg

Edited by davidbr
  • Like 9
  • Craftsmanship/clever 4
  • Round of applause 2
Link to comment
  • RMweb Gold
Mikkel

Posted (edited)

On 20/01/2022 at 11:33, wenlock said:

Hi Mikkel,

 

Good to see an something from the latest edition of "Horse Drawn Weekly":)  Beautifully modelled, I particularly like the roof rails and luggage.

 

BW

 

Dave

 

Hi Dave, many thanks. I had forgotten about Horse Drawn Weekly! I hope it will feature an entry from Sherton Abbas soon? If all else fails, a 7mm horsebox will do.

 

 

On 20/01/2022 at 12:25, MikeOxon said:

I agree - I'm doing a lot of reading at present, with future modelling in mind.  It's a fascinating world of splinter bars, swingles, futchells, and lots of other mysterious paraphernalia.

 

Incidentally I read that the raised box 'seat' for the driver is usual, with a lower seat sometimes provided for a passenger to ride alongside - this appears to be the correct configuration for the horse bus.

 

Mike

 

Now you've made me look up swingle-trees and futchells. Excellent words, I'll see if I can discretely pop them into a sentence at work to test my English-speaking colleagues :)

 

 

On 20/01/2022 at 17:54, davidbr said:

The driver's seat is often raised and wedge-shaped, tilting forwards.  One adopts a position which is more upright, more like perching on a bar stool.  It enables you to put more pressure on your feet which helps controlling the horse(s).  I did a bit of driving some years ago.  If I had the space I would do it again.

 

Thanks for confirming that David, good to hear it from the horse's mouth (sorry!). I think this superb photo demonstrates the position:

 

2_2004-3354-LGOC-horse-bus-on-Peckham-Pa

London 1895. Source: Embedded link from MyLondon. 

 

Edited by Mikkel
  • Like 3
  • Agree 1
Link to comment
  • RMweb Gold
41 minutes ago, davidbr said:

Mikkel.  Your work has often been described as 'inspirational' and for once, I have been inspired actually to do something.  I have had this omnibus part-made for some time but your post here has got me going.

 

The kit is very similar to yours but I am not sure of it's origin as there are differences.  The roof is cast in the checked pattern which I filed down and filled the holes with some paint to reduce the chunky look.  The two mouldings around the waist are cast on my kit.  I can't remember the corner joints as I had already made and painted the model.  

 

However, I have aded the railings around the top and added a couple of small rollers of brass micro-tube at the top of the luggage hoist; there is a rail around the driver's seat; I have painted a faint gold lining on the mouldings and added 'Great Western Railway'.  The latter I culled from a photo of a cast sign, bumped the resolution up to 300dpi then reduced it to 1mm tall and printed it on ivory coloured paper.  I have coloured the tyres with an HB pencil, a tip I was given recently and to get the silver in to the lamps I used a very small burr.

 

I apologise for the photos.  I just cannot take a decent one at the moment, whatever I do.  Perhaps it is the poor winter light but I am more inclined to my ineptitude.

 

Thank you, Mikkel.

 

Station-Bus_S2725.jpg.397f9cad67069aa34e3f46425b2abf2c.jpgStation-bus_S2726.jpg.db9886a312ba730cbe4d1d3d547af682.jpg

 

That's fantastic David! 

 

And very interesting to learn that there seems to be an improved version of the kit - unless it's a different one altogether. In any case your extra detailing looks great. The lettering does add a lot (the 1894 prototype photo shows all over chocolate, but you could always claim it was repainted at a later stage!).

 

 

  • Like 2
Link to comment

My Marsh horse-drawn station bus kit is in the mail!

 

I really wanted to mention that Langley do a horse drawn omnibus kit with two horses (Kit G21), should anyone be so inclined.  

  • Like 2
Link to comment
  • RMweb Gold

 

57 minutes ago, Dana Ashdown said:

My Marsh horse-drawn station bus kit is in the mail!

 

Sounds good, in the end there'll be enough of us to form a club :) It will be interesting to see which version of the kit you get. IIRC mine was bought directly from PD Marsh too.

 

57 minutes ago, Dana Ashdown said:

I really wanted to mention that Langley do a horse drawn omnibus kit with two horses (Kit G21), should anyone be so inclined.  

 

Ah yes, very tempting. @SVS  has built that kit with great results, it's on his Ludgate Circus thread here:

 

https://www.rmweb.co.uk/community/index.php?/topic/157713-ludgate-circus/&do=findComment&comment=4107622

 

  • Like 1
Link to comment
  • RMweb Gold

I will post this here as this is about buses, but you can tell me to go back to my own thread if you like.

 

I was wondering what bus I should have for Traeth Mawr, not wanting a double decker, and wondering if there was a different one than the one you built.  I have not found anything, so I thought I would look at my favourite Barmouth picture sight to see what ran in Barmouth.

 

In 1896 there was this, and the next one on.  In 1910, they were still there in this postcard.  The sign on the side of the first one says Barmouth Dolgelley, so I think these are sightseeing buses, but of little use to me for taking luggage and passengers to the local hotels.  Mind you they are less than half a mile away so I will only need something for the luggage.

 

However, these are very interesting.  I have never seen a kit for them, although I may I suppose make one to take tourists u the Naf valley.

 

They were later replace by motor driven ones of the same sort of style.  Glad it does not rain in Wales.

  • Like 4
Link to comment
  • RMweb Gold
Mikkel

Posted (edited)

I agree Chris, those are interesting vehicles and would be lovely models.

 

7 hours ago, ChrisN said:

In 1896 there was this,

 

Funny how that looks like a modern day re-enactment. Perhaps because there are no beards?

 

7 hours ago, ChrisN said:

In 1910, they were still there in this postcard.

 

The one on the right is particularly attractive. I like the boys hanging on at the back. Is that cloth draped across the seats?

 

I haven't seen any kits that come close to this, although as Dave says I suppose you could use the chassis and lower sides of the Dart Castings or Scale Link offerings (I think the former would be easier to work with in this case).

 

Edited by Mikkel
  • Like 2
Link to comment
8 hours ago, ChrisN said:

In 1896 there was this

Surely this one is actually a stage coach, such as this kit - probably in HO though.  Wasn't there a revival in interest in stage coaches in the 1890's, some years after the railways had forced the original ones off the road.  Four horses and lots of attendants, including a post-horn seems a bit over the top for taking passengers from the station to their hotel. Welcome to Disneyland, Victorian-style!

 

image.png.786eea154a849f98135901e2b5332a0f.png

  • Like 4
Link to comment
  • RMweb Gold
ChrisN

Posted (edited)

9 hours ago, Dave John said:

Dart castings Brougham might form a basis for one Chris. 

 

https://www.dartcastings.co.uk/dart/L55.php

 

I have made one, a delicate kit but comes out nicely. 

 

Dave,

Thank you.  That might be interesting.

 

2 hours ago, Mikkel said:

I agree Chris, those are interesting vehicles and would be lovely models.

 

 

Funny how that looks like a modern day re-enactment. Perhaps because there are no beards?

 

 

The one on the right is particularly attractive. I like the boys hanging on at the back. Is that cloth draped across the seats?

 

I haven't seen any kits that come close to this, although as Dave says I suppose you could use the chassis and lower sides of the Dart Castings or Scale Link offerings (I think the former would be easier to work with in this case).

 

 

Mikkel,

I think you are right about the cloths.  Maybe they were to soften the hard backs of the chairs.  Not many customers though.

 

I wonder if the boys were meant to be there, or, more likely, just hanging off the back for fun until they were noticed?

 

 

1 hour ago, Nick Holliday said:

Surely this one is actually a stage coach, such as this kit - probably in HO though.  Wasn't there a revival in interest in stage coaches in the 1890's, some years after the railways had forced the original ones off the road.  Four horses and lots of attendants, including a post-horn seems a bit over the top for taking passengers from the station to their hotel. Welcome to Disneyland, Victorian-style!

 

image.png.786eea154a849f98135901e2b5332a0f.png

 

Nick,

The next picture is clearer and shows it has no roof.  It is surprising how like the stage coach it is in design.  I am sure it is a tourist coach for taking people up the A496.

 

If I modelled that stage coach then Stadden figures would have to walk as only the Preiser ones would fit.

 

I once found a website dedicated to a forum for people who made model horse drawn vehicles, but larger the 4mm.  It was depressing, but reassuring to find out that by the third post down one person was having a go at someone else for not doing it the correct way.

Edited by ChrisN
  • Like 2
Link to comment
17 minutes ago, ChrisN said:

Nick,

The next picture is clearer and shows it has no roof.  It is surprising how like the stage coach it is in design.  I am sure it is a tourist coach for taking people up the A496.

 

If I modelled that stage coach then Stadden figures would have to walk as only the Preiser ones would fit.

The two vehicles are very different:

image.png.568f380e3fe69428eaa13dcabf685376.png

I agree the second is a tourist design, but the first is definitely based on a stage coach.

I've located a book published by the BBC in connection with a 1985 programme, and it appears the renaissance of coaching started earlier than I thought, around the end of the 1860's and lasted until 1928.  It was more like the current preservation scene.  The coaches were not expected to be particularly profitable, and were run mainly for the benefit of the owners who often took part in the driving, and for travellers to experience a way of life that had all but disappeared - much like riding behind a steam loco.

It includes an advertising item from 1909, which shows the seating arrangement on the roof.

image.png.c3b69516f8d2b5d60310b2b582af7de0.png

 

  • Like 4
  • Thanks 1
Link to comment
  • RMweb Gold
24 minutes ago, Nick Holliday said:

The two vehicles are very different:

image.png.568f380e3fe69428eaa13dcabf685376.png

I agree the second is a tourist design, but the first is definitely based on a stage coach.

I've located a book published by the BBC in connection with a 1985 programme, and it appears the renaissance of coaching started earlier than I thought, around the end of the 1860's and lasted until 1928.  It was more like the current preservation scene.  The coaches were not expected to be particularly profitable, and were run mainly for the benefit of the owners who often took part in the driving, and for travellers to experience a way of life that had all but disappeared - much like riding behind a steam loco.

It includes an advertising item from 1909, which shows the seating arrangement on the roof.

image.png.c3b69516f8d2b5d60310b2b582af7de0.png

 

 

Nick,

Yes of course.  The more I look at them the more obvious it becomes.  I think I did not notice as I did not even consider that the first could be a stagecoach.  That opens up all sorts of possibilities, but an H0 one would look too small.

Link to comment

Found another example of the second type on Gail Thornton's website, but only three horses.

 

image.png.f8f6779c5dd3e347efc436882b98c43f.png

There are a couple of stage coaches on Shapeways, but only in HO and Z(!) at the moment.

  • Like 2
  • Interesting/Thought-provoking 1
Link to comment
  • RMweb Gold
14 minutes ago, Nick Holliday said:

Found another example of the second type on Gail Thornton's website, but only three horses.

 

image.png.f8f6779c5dd3e347efc436882b98c43f.png

There are a couple of stage coaches on Shapeways, but only in HO and Z(!) at the moment.

 

I suppose you could always ask them to resize to 00 as I did on this site for the hats.

  • Interesting/Thought-provoking 1
Link to comment
14 hours ago, Dave John said:

Dart castings Brougham might form a basis for one Chris.

Unfortunately, the Dart Castings Brougham is listed as 'not currently available'.  Langley models list one (25 available) at: https://www.langleymodels.co.uk/awd1/index.php?route=product/product&path=190_191_200&product_id=5681

 

P&D Marsh and Scale Link both do kit for a bus like Mikkel's, which I believe is appropriate for more rural locations, as shown by the photo at Bampton - http://www.fairfordbranch.co.uk/History.htm

 

Mike

  • Informative/Useful 2
Link to comment
  • RMweb Gold

Rural yes, but these designs were also used for some big city station shuttles, as per the LNWR example up thread.

 

On a related note, I attach an article by Jack Simmons: Railways, Hotels, and Tourism in Great Britain 1839-1914, which I found interesting. It is not specifically about station buses, but he mentions them on occasion, e.g.: 

 

"Railway stations, on the other hand, were almost always sited on the outskirts of towns; and though they were furnished with waiting rooms, and presently with refreshment rooms too, as a rule they were much less comfortable places than the coffee-rooms of even rather indifferent inns. Most passengers spent as little time in them as possible, using the horse-bus services that immediately started running between stations and town centres, to the advantage of the innkeepers, who thus recovered some of the business they had lost from the dis- continuance of the long-distance coaches."

 

Simmons 1984.pdf

 

 

 

  • Informative/Useful 3
  • Interesting/Thought-provoking 2
Link to comment
1 hour ago, Mikkel said:

....

 

"Railway stations, on the other hand, were almost always sited on the outskirts of towns; and though they were furnished with waiting rooms, and presently with refreshment rooms too, as a rule they were much less comfortable places than the coffee-rooms of even rather indifferent inns. Most passengers spent as little time in them as possible, ..."

Rather like airports today!

  • Like 4
Link to comment
On 31/01/2022 at 09:55, MikeOxon said:

P&D Marsh and Scale Link both do kit for a bus like Mikkel's, which I believe is appropriate for more rural locations, as shown by the photo at Bampton - http://www.fairfordbranch.co.uk/History.htm

I wonder if you could modify the Marsh omnibus to something close to that pictured on the Fairford Branch page? The top and stairs would have to go.

  • Like 1
  • Interesting/Thought-provoking 1
Link to comment
  • RMweb Gold
Mikkel

Posted (edited)

It's certainly delightful, the sign alone is a little work of art:

 

 image.png.684100d7ebc98e250559607bc9bf037c.png

 

 

Edit:  Found this, an advert from the 1911 Kelly's Trade Directory
 

W_Payne___Son__Great_Western_Railway_Co_Agents__Bampton_and_Lechlade.jpg.ceadcd499305e64d67288b424898c70e.jpg

 

Source: https://atom.bamptonarchive.org/index.php/chipping-norton?listPage=2&sort=lastUpdated&listLimit=100

 

And from ebay:

 

image.png.9fac998a949729b9db5042748347a4e6.png

 

 

So what you might say, but I am interested in what type of businesses the GWR's agents were, i.e. what type of work did they do apart from their GWR contracts, how important were the GWR contracts compared to their other work etc. It all adds a bit to the understanding.

 

Edited by Mikkel
  • Agree 1
Link to comment

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

×
×
  • Create New...