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Image restoration from pre-May 2021 continues and may take an indefinite period of time.

A CR 323 class part 1 , wheels


Dave John

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One of the CR engines I have always fancied making is the 323 class, also known as the Jubilee Tanks, first built 1887. There is no kit, so they are rarely modelled, though Jim Watt has made a lovely example in 2 mm fs.

 

A pic.

 

1164707690_CRclass323.jpg.db0ef357b3da09769bdb523dbc560168.jpg

 

 

 

 

The first issue is the wheels. As  built they had 4’ 6” 10 spoke T section wheels. Later rebuilds had plain spokes, but thats after my time period. Nobody makes them, nearest offering is Gibson 11 plain spoke, so I’m going to have a go at converting them.

 

Some parts cut out with the silhouette.

 

1990417502_CRjt11.JPG.485fc75bc58f04425296995751879658.JPG

 

 

The rear face of the wheel is skimmed down very carefully on the lathe. Over the christmas period I fitted a new motor to the lathe, one of the sewing machine types with electronic speed control. I really don’t know how I managed with the old 1920s open frame motor it used to have. Thanks to snitzl for that tip.

 

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The silhouette cut parts are then glued to the wheels.

 

 

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The parts cleaned up, assembled and a spray of paint.

 

 

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I feel that they do look sufficiently like the prototype, certainly in terms of normal viewing distances on the layout. I know that there have been developments in printing custom wheel centres to fit manufacturers tyres, but for now I am content to have a go with the resources available to me.

 

 

Edited by Dave John
pics replaced

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11 Comments


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First thought: unusually skinny tank.

Second thought: unusually fat boiler? No.

Third thought: unusually narrow engine, at least for a tank engine - perhaps no more than 7 ft over footplate?

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I commend you on your choice of locomotive, they are wonderful wee pugs.

 

Many years ago I was lucky enough to see an EM gauge version built by the late Peter James. He wrote an article briefly describing how he went about building it. If I remember rightly he made his own wheels, and possibly even the motor as well. Peter was a true master and his locomotives were straight out the top draw. I often wonder what happened to his collection.

 

I'll look forward seeing your progress.

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Just Revell contacta Regularity.

 

They are narrow compound , I think not much over 7' footplate. I have cut a footplate at 29 mm, I'll make some other parts and eye things up. 

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snitzl

Posted (edited)

Very interesting to see you doing wheel modifications with the lathe, and I'm so glad that the motor worked out for you.

I now have these sewing machine motors on three machines, here's one fitted to the BCA jig Borer / Mill.

106-IMG_1933.JPG.5d8d0da4cc304d1c3473f1f4aa77445a.JPG

 

Edited by snitzl
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A nice installation there Snitzl. 

 

I was surprised how controllable they are for the price. 

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Nice work on the wheels, but, just for the record:-

"The first issue is the wheels. As  built they had 4’ 6” 10 spoke T section wheels. Later rebuilds had plain spokes, but that's after my time period. Nobody makes them, nearest offering is Gibson 11 plain spoke, so I’m going to have a go at converting them."  Phoenix-Paints are listing Jubilee Pug wheels from the Sharman range as currently in stock. https://www.phoenix-paints.co.uk/products/sharman-wheels/4mm-steam-locomotive-driving-wheels/4-6-4-8/sw-m152 

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snitzl

Posted (edited)

On 16/01/2022 at 13:23, Dave John said:

I was surprised how controllable they are for the price. 

Two of the functions in the controller that I've found very handy is having the abilty to set the maximum top speed and also reverse the motor.  I use two motors on the lathe with one controller and switch the plug as required

24-IMG_1646.JPG.3980cb15a680133ec7abe168cf75b55d.JPG

 

 

Edited by snitzl
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Thanks Nick, searches didn't bring up the Sharman wheels, but useful for folk to know.

 

 

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Certainly a loco I thought about building some time ago, but not now - too much else to do.

I look forward to seeing the progress.

Jim P

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