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Bury goods 0-4-0


5&9Models

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This scratch build is something I have been wanting to do for years but have never quite plucked up the courage.

 

There are several 'sticking points' in modelling a bar framed Bury loco, the obvious one being the distinctive wheels. All Bury locos had them so unless you get those right you might as well not bother with the rest. Thankfully, a friend very kindly drew some up and 3D printed the centres to be fitted into Gibson tyres of the appropriate diameter. However, I found the prints to be exquisitely detailed but not very strong. So I decided the best way forward was to use one of the prints as a master and cast a set in white metal. These came out well and are considerably stronger than the prints. The down side is that they are conductive so once cleaned up on the lathe and fitted with tyres, the centres had to be bored out and a tiny plastic sleeve forced in before being bored out again and secured to the axle.

 

I first made a master for the bar frames out of styrene to use as a master for casting them in white metal but decided that the castings would not be robust enough so instead some brass bar was used to fabricate the frames. They're now plenty strong enough for the job as I made them slightly chunkier than the originals for peace of mind. Springs were made from some very useful etches, bearings added and a buffer beam built up from nickel silver and brass. 

 

The buffer beam was soldered in position but a trial fit of the wheels revealed that the buffer centre height was too low by just over 1mm. Rather than unsolder and move the buffer beam higher which would look daft, I decided to unsolder the bearings and fit them lower down in the frames. This sounded like a horrible job, unsoldering the bearings whilst not accidentally disturbing any other soldered joints. However, it went well and before refitting the bearings I cut and fitted the footplate to ensure everything was square and spaced properly. This actually made it easier to get the bearing in exactly the right place. Lesson learned for when I tackle the Bury passenger 2-2-0 later on.

 

The photo shows progress so far. The next job will be to scratch build the gearbox and ensure the motor sits at the right level so it can hide inside the boiler. Something tells me that this won't be particularly straightforward but I feel up for the challenge. Wish me luck...!

 

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Bury Goods.jpg

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kitpw

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There's almost nothing on that engine that you don't have to scratch build, I can see why you needed a dose of courage to even start it - but what a start! Those frames and wheels really give a distinctly 1845 look to the engine - bravo!

 

Edited by kitpw
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Thanks kitpw, even 1845 is a bit modern for this one, it’s an 1838 model. 
I do seem to make life difficult for myself…!

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A good solid looking start . The wheels are an awkward design with the spokes offset at the hub like that but your castings have worked out really well. 

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Just a thought - having got conducting wheels, did you consider going down the split frame route?

 

Best wishes

 

Richard

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I once tried building up bar frames by soldering up bits of brass bar, but as fast as I made one joint, the heat had run to the rest and undone them. It’s a terribly finicky thing to attempt, so well done. Then there’s those wheel centres...

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I made some bar frames for a 7mm scale Schenectady 2-6-0 but rather than risk what happened to Northroader I drilled, fretted and filed them from steel plate. It took ages and a lot of effort but enabled me to solder in frame spacers, motion plates etc. without ending up with a collection of bits. I think that 5 & 9's model is looking splendid. I have been meaning to make an 1848 Jenny Lind for decades now but have only got as far as machining the boiler fittings. Maybe watching this thread will spur me into action?

 

Dave

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Really enjoying this already. Re-heat soak causing disassembly as fast as assembly I employ technique used for welding (although looks like I'm probably teaching the OP to sick eggs given what's been done already).

 

Set your piece up so that there is a heat sink between your new joint and the existing ones. Tool makers clamps are good for this or a steel block. You need a reasonable surface to surface connection. Use more heat but less time to melt the joint. You may need to let it cool and go again several times to get a full/neat joint.

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2 hours ago, Richard Jones said:

Just a thought - having got conducting wheels, did you consider going down the split frame route?

 

Such a good question. I did consider split frames then chickened out as I was concerned about the structural integrity of the loco considering there's not a lot tying one side to the other, and the firebox and smokebox were going to be castings to provide tractive weight. On the other hand I think there are ways around this and I'm still considering the split frame option for the two 2-2-0 passenger versions I have yet to build. It's a case of 'watch this space'.

 

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1 hour ago, Dave Hunt said:

I have been meaning to make an 1848 Jenny Lind for decades now but have only got as far as machining the boiler fittings. Maybe watching this thread will spur me into action?

The Jenny is definitely a great choice. Best wishes with that project and please share progress, I'd love to see how you get on.

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Glad you could use the wheel prints as casting masters. It all looks brilliant, as ever. Looking forward to eventually seeing some of this sometime in the future. Cheers, Ian

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1 hour ago, ianmaccormac said:

Glad you could use the wheel prints as casting masters. It all looks brilliant, as ever. Looking forward to eventually seeing some of this sometime in the future. Cheers, Ian

Thanks so much for the prints Ian, it’s the sort of thing that makes or breaks this kind of model. I also have the passenger versions you printed waiting for tyres to be fitted. I’ll try Richard’s suggestion of a split chassis for that one and we’ll see how it goes.

Cheers!

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