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Parkside Dundas 16T Mineral


halfwit

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These four have been on my workbench for a couple of weeks now. They are the Parkside kit for a BR diagram 1/108 mineral wagon, slightly modified. A pic;

 

blogentry-6749-084947300 1290506153_thumb.jpg

 

I've used MJT rocking w-irons to compensate, perhaps not necessary in EM but I felt like using them;

 

blogentry-6749-079888600 1290506261_thumb.jpg

 

I had a problem with the first wagon that I built this way (on the left in the picture above) in that the w-irons were attached onto the wagon floor and when the solebars were offered up the bearing hole in the axlebox was too high to locate in the bearing which meant some fiddling with a drill. I did accidently drill through one axlebox, see pic. below, awaiting a spare from MJT;

 

blogentry-6749-056400200 1290506562_thumb.jpg

 

The solution used on the other three wagons was to cut two strips of .020" plasticard 3mm wide and attach to the edges of the floor. Then the w-irons can be glued in place in the 'recess', the wheelbase being set with a Brassmasters jig which also makes sure that the axles are parallel. The solebars can now sit on the plasticard strip which puts the axleboxes in line with the bearings. Before I did all this the bodies were assembled onto the floors. ( To remove the moulded w-iron detail I filed it away from the back, making a stepped recess on the solebar but leaving the axlebox and spring detail. On the compensated end the axlebox and spring was seperated by cutting the spring where it meets the solebar. The seperated part can then be glued to the rocking w-iron, slightly trimmed so as not to inhibit movement).

 

Other mods. are replacing the buffers with cast MJT items and cutting the guard straps off the brakes and replacing them with ones bent from staples. I didn't use the supplied plastic door bangers either. New ones were bent up from .060" x .010" brass strip, to give them a good ancher I glued a piece of .040" x .060" plastic strip onto the solebar. Weight is aquarium plant weight, these weigh around 40-45 grams.

 

Paul.

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I tend to find that plastic open wagons have a tendancy to bow inwards overtime - very unprototypical as they would tend to bow outwards (if at all for steels). Make a lid of close fitting plasticard and cement it in place a few mm below the top of the wagon, upon which a load can be rested.

 

The guard strap (safety hangers?) mod is worthwhile and not one I have thought of before but it lifts the quality of the brakegear quite a lot.

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When assembling the bodies I use an offcut of sprue slightly wider than the interior jammed in place to bow the sides out very slightly. Pictures of steel wagons that have seen a lot of service can show some quite heavy bowing!

The guard strap/safety hanger mod only takes a couple of minutes and I feel does improve things without spending money on etched parts.

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Another way of dealing with the bowing is to scribe the door panel lines in deeply and bend the sides along these door lines before its assembled. It'll keep the slight outward bend when finished then. I did this successfully on all of my Parkside wooden body minerals previously.

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Thanks for the tip Craig. I was going to scribe door panel lines on the interior of my next batch of minerals so using them to help bow the sides out makes perfect sense.

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  • RMweb Gold

Nice work Paul you have really packed the lead in! Just out of interest do you find that any of your wagons have a wobble when an MJT W-Iron is installed? I'm trying to work out what I am doing wrong as sometimes when I use these I get a wobble on the wagon.

 

Kind regards,

 

Nick.

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Nick - I do get a wobble but I put that down to eccentric wheels, I've found it hard finding Gibson wheels that are concentric. The worst seem to be the 10mm lowmac type. Kean-Maygib are better but dificult to find.

 

Paul.

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  • RMweb Gold

Nick - I do get a wobble but I put that down to eccentric wheels, I've found it hard finding Gibson wheels that are concentric. The worst seem to be the 10mm lowmac type. Kean-Maygib are better but dificult to find.

 

Paul.

 

Cheers Paul,

 

That's really helpful. I might try some Exactoscale ones at some point.

 

Regards,

 

Nick

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The guard strap/safety hanger mod only takes a couple of minutes and I feel does improve things without spending money on etched parts.

 

Over the last few years I've throttled back a bit on my detailing but that's something I still do when practical. FWIW I also use flattened staples.

 

I didn't use the supplied plastic door bangers either.

 

Good man :yes: They're too thick; too many people IMO build a kit as it comes, without looking at a prototype photo

 

Nick - I do get a wobble but I put that down to eccentric wheels, I've found it hard finding Gibson wheels that are concentric.

 

Sometimes it's the interaction of wheel and bearing, swapping the wheelset onto another wagon can sort it (or at least minimise it). But the tyre-on-plastic composite construction is rarely as reliable as a machined wheel like a Romford.

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