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A chapel for Paynestown


Barry Ten

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I wanted a typically South Wales-looking chapel/church for Paynestown but as the layout developed, it didn't look as if there'd be room for it. However, I've since decided that I don't like the hill on the right side of the model (behind the carriage shed), which was done in a hurry and has never looked quite right to my eyes. By slicing the top off, I can create enough area for a reasonable sized building which will help reinforce the location.

 

There are enough chapels in my neck of the woods that one hardly needs to do any "research" (my nearest one is now a Jewson builders merchants), but rather than copy a prototype, I wanted to make use of some bits and pieces already in the scrap box and produce a representative hybrid. The main problem was going to be the windows, so I looked around to see if there were any chapels that used a similar style to the Wills wall/window pieces. My concern was that these windows wouldn't have the pointed arch that I associate with churches, but a quick trawl of Google soon threw plenty of chapels and churches that had round-topped windows much like the Wills ones, both in single and double storey varieties. I also spotted that there are often smaller windows above the door, for which the Ratio industrial windows would be just the ticket.

 

Other than that, it's largely imaginary; I don't know whether it's Wesleyan or Methodist or what have you. I do know that it won't be a Jewsons!

 

Paint to follow, it'll probably be red brick and stone trim although part of me likes the idea of painting the bricks white or cream and then offsetting this with red trim.

 

blogentry-6720-0-08361400-1299189372_thumb.jpg

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9 Comments


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  • RMweb Gold

Very appealing building Al. To me it looks decidedly like the Church of Persevering Modellers Worldwide :)

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Al,

.

Will it have 'Zoar' or 'Bethel' or 'Salem' over the entrance ?

.

Something I've never seen modelled before - I can hear the Cor Meibion Trepayne practising inside, it sounds like Handel's Messiah again this week !

.

Brian

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  • RMweb Gold

I saw one with Zion on it yesterday, in Camarthen. I must admit to knowing next to nothing about all these denominations - my knowledge of religions institutions would shame Father Dougal McGuire. But they are lovely buildings.

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That certainly is an attractive building that is instantly recognisable as a non-conformist chapel. My only concern is the doorway which, to me, looks far too elaborate for this type of building. Most non-conformist sects have favoured the more austere look which invokes some of their differences from the main established churches. Of course, you may have discovered a little known group of, perhaps, decadent baptists :blink:

 

Nick

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  • RMweb Gold

Nick - that shows how little I understand these matters, alas, as I don't doubt that you're right. The doorway was pinched from the scrap box - perhaps I should consider something plainer?

 

Here's the one I saw yesterday during a lovely afternoon in Camarthen (not my photo):

 

Zion, Mansel Street, Carmarthen

 

And here's one that provided the inspiration for the drain pipe, cunningly positioned to conceal the break between two pieces of Wills sheeting:

 

http://www.churches-uk-ireland.org/images/manc/manc/openshaw_beulah.jpg

 

Handy, when life imitates art!

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Yes, I think a plainer doorway would suit the size of your building. There certainly are chapels with ornate frontages, indeed the first of your images is quite restrained compared to some. However, the more ornate ones are usually larger, often with two rows of windows to light both the floor level and an upper gallery. Your second image is much more in keeping with the scale of your building.

 

The well-placed drainpipe is a useful trick to remember :)

 

Nick

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I'd not worry about the front at all Barry. Lots of non-conformist chapels embellished their doorways, often some time after the main chapel was built. Some look incongruous, others match well. Swansea has a few absolute gems to illustrate this.

 

The frontage often has dedication plaques also, noting the date the foundation stone was laid and by whom.

 

Tony

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I worship in the Church of The Barry Ten!

Great looking building there Al

 

More pics please!

 

Cheers matey

Roger

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