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* * * * * 6 votes

GWR large flat dray

Posted by Mikkel , in The Old Yard, Horse drawn, Figures 07 August 2018 · 769 views

GWR Horse drawn dray figures goods Andrew Stadden Dart Castings

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Here's the third and last instalment about my recent trio of horse drawn wagons. This is yet another GWR "dray", as they are commonly known. GWR drawings generally use the term "trolley", which I understand was the original and more correct term for what is today popularly called drays.

 

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The wagon was built from an old Pendon kit, picked up on ebay. There is no mention of the prototype, but it resembles a 7 ton trolley drawing in the Great Western Horsepower book.

 

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An illustration of the variation in length and width of three kits for flat drays/trolleys – nicely reflecting how the prototypes varied too, as vehicles do of course. On the left is a Dart Castings offering (see earlier post), and on the right is the Slater’s kit which really is quite large. The Pendon kit is the middle one.

 

 

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The only structural modification I made was the addition of the rear flap (is there a proper name?). These are usually in the down position, held by chains.

 

 

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The main part of the project involved modifying the horse, the carter (aka carman) and "van lad".

 

 

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The horse is from the Dart Castings stable. The photo above illustrates some of their range (no connection), with the measurements as stated in their lists. I like their 1:87 draft horse, which has the bulk of a strong horse but isn’t visually overpowering, as I think some horses can be in a layout context.

 

 

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I had a couple of these horses so modified one of them by raising its head. The neck from a discarded old Langley horse helped achieve this.

 

 

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On the left is the original figure by Dart Castings (as used on my “Ratkin & Son" wagon), on the right is the modified one.

 

 

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Similar work was done to make the carter, using a Dart Castings body and an Andrew Stadden head. Period photos and early film show that on flat drays like these, carters very often sat on the left side, like this. Presumably it is the safest and most practical position when you have to get on and off frequently, as they did.

 

 

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The van lad was made by modifying an Andrew Stadden figure, as seen here. He has not yet reached the grade that allows him to wear a uniform.

 

 

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A load was made using surplus items from the goods depot, e.g. my DIY cotton bales and crates, and various kits and ready-made items.

 

 

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I added some indicative roping from EZ line. Just a couple of ropes, as too much of this sort of thing tends to distract the eye in my view. In any case, the roping and packing practices on horsedrawn vehicles seems to have been more relaxed than on the permanent way. Two examples here and here.

 

 

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The other side. I tried to avoid colour clashes when building the load.

 

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And finally the wagon in place on the layout. That concludes this little series of horsey updates for now. Keep on trotting!

  • Craftsmanship/Clever x 37
  • Like x 7





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webbcompound
Aug 07 2018 21:17

This is absolutely lovely. But there need to be some chains and straps holding the shafts and the harness together.

Inspiring stuff Mikkel, along with Mike and his Crampton type loco building and your horse drawn wagons, there's two more items for the todo list...

Not much more to say about your excellent observation and use of available figures / kits Mikkel.

I would hope to use these monograms of each waggon to produce something similar myself eventually in 7mm.

This small insight of the waggons as a whole is itself a subject on its own and you've done us proud here.

I still can't quite come to terms with the price sticker though !

Seems mine will have to be scratch built if it's to be a "local" waggon and also refer to a very early edition of the MRJ in which waggons for Pendon were the subject of a very interesting and useful article.

G
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The Great Bear
Aug 07 2018 22:39

Sublime modelling, Mikkel...

This is absolutely lovely. But there need to be some chains and straps holding the shafts and the harness together.

 
Thanks very much. I agree that in these close-ups it does look a bit odd that there are no chains, reins etc. However I'm reluctant to fit them for practical reasons. On an earlier wagon I fitted chains and it proved troublesome whenever I wanted to move the wagon in order to clean, move or store the layout. I anticipate I will have to do this often in the future as we are moving to a flat where I will probably have to set up the layout whenever I want to run trains. 
 
One option I have considered is to dig out an old idea I had of mounting the horse-drawn wagons on in-sets, as illustrated below. The challenge is what to do with the joins. I'm thinking that my next layout will have setts, so that may be a way forward...
 
 Image18b.jpg

 

Image1c.jpg
 
 

Inspiring stuff Mikkel, along with Mike and his Crampton type loco building and your horse drawn wagons, there's two more items for the todo list...

 
Thanks Snitzl, and yes please it would be good to see some horse drawn stuff on Fun Town - or in another context. I can easily imagine how good they would look -  especially in combination with some vintage Victorian locos á la Mike!
 

Not much more to say about your excellent observation and use of available figures / kits Mikkel.
 
I would hope to use these monograms of each waggon to produce something similar myself eventually in 7mm.
 
This small insight of the waggons as a whole is itself a subject on its own and you've done us proud here.
 
I still can't quite come to terms with the price sticker though !
 
Seems mine will have to be scratch built if it's to be a "local" waggon and also refer to a very early edition of the MRJ in which waggons for Pendon were the subject of a very interesting and useful article.
 
G


Thank you Grahame. A scratchbuilt 7mm farm wagon in the style of the MRJ article that you sent would be something very special, especially knowing your skills.
 
Incidentally I was debating whether to spell it waggon or wagon. I read somewhere that the former describes road vehicles, and the latter rail vehicles. But then I read somewhere else that waggon is simply an outdated version of wagon. I wonder which is correct.

 

Sublime modelling, Mikkel...


Thanks very much GB. It's odd how much enjoyment can be had from a project as small as this. Adding that goods load was one of the most relaxing little exercises I've been doing for months. The joys of simple things...

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Job's Modelling
Aug 08 2018 06:55

Excellent modelling. Think I can learn a lot of your approach of metal figures. Hope I can achieve the same result with ny Edwardian diorama.

Your way of handling the load of the flat dray learned my a lesson. I had an idea for my Northall 1959 diorama's but skipped it because I thought it would take to much time. I will pick it up again. Your are right: it is mostly the joy of simple things.

£1.50 for a wagon kit, those were the days!   Another splendid wagon, the modified horse really captures the stance of a beast during a busy working day.

 

The picture of the different horse sizes is very useful, the Suffolk Punch is quite some animal, you wouldn't want your foot trodden on by him!

 

Hopefully someone else will take over Horse Drawn Weekly, I think we are probably both done for the time being:-)

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Northroader
Aug 08 2018 10:48
Another lovely job, the way you chop up the figures,two legs and four, to get the right posture is a real inspiration, and the load looks good, too.
Regarding the use of the word "waggon" I prefer to maintain Old Engish whenever possible in descriptions ( ok call me old fashioned :) ) but I'm of the school where if these words and descriptions aren't used they could possibly be lost forever. The word was mainly used throughout the 18c into the 19c when it progressively became shortened until we have the common usage today. Yours Ann Edwardian :)

Are you compensating for a boyhood wish to become a surgeon, Mikkel?  I do like the variety you introduce by manipulating commercial figures.  Your illustration of different trolleys also makes it clear that dimensional differences of a few inches are irrelevant, when modelling such vehicles.

 

Your loads are very attractive as well but, if you are going to add any roping, I feel the need for some fore and aft restraint - these boxes look in danger of tumbling off what I think is called the tailboard.

 

I like the modular concept too, as a means of allowing variety and different running periods.  I think KNP uses the idea on Little Muddle to some extent.

 

I'm still wondering what's in those sacks that I can see, lurking in the background on the last photo in your post :)

Superb modelling Mikkel, everything looks right, the pose of the figures, the colour pallet, the tone.

Simply lovely and well observed.

Terrific stuff yet again Mikkel.

Love the way you modify the nags head not just the people’s head!

Superb modelling as always... :good:
Thanks everyone, away from computer now but will reply later.
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PaternosterRow
Aug 10 2018 01:06
More brilliance from the master. Lovely work.

Ah, yes, two posts I missed.  It is inspirational, especially the figures.  When I get some modelling time, and I have finished my coaches. 

 

I assume the children have moved out and you do not want them coming back!  :-)  We downsized to a smaller house.  I told my wife it was not big enough as she likes to have all three of our lads round at Christmas.  Fortunately one lives locally but the other two families could not fit in our house on their own.  I am struggling to get my layout up.  I need to get my two eldest grandchildren on to it, "Nana, I really want to play with the railway."

Mikkle

 

As usual just stunning work

Excellent modelling. Think I can learn a lot of your approach of metal figures. Hope I can achieve the same result with ny Edwardian diorama.

Your way of handling the load of the flat dray learned my a lesson. I had an idea for my Northall 1959 diorama's but skipped it because I thought it would take to much time. I will pick it up again. Your are right: it is mostly the joy of simple things.

 

Thanks Job, I see you are already underway with a horse. I wonder what that idea is. More of your whiskey boxes maybe? 

 

£1.50 for a wagon kit, those were the days!   Another splendid wagon, the modified horse really captures the stance of a beast during a busy working day.

 

The picture of the different horse sizes is very useful, the Suffolk Punch is quite some animal, you wouldn't want your foot trodden on by him!

 

Hopefully someone else will take over Horse Drawn Weekly, I think we are probably both done for the time being:-)

 

Thanks Dave, I have to say that the Suffolk Punch looks a bit over powering. I bought two to replace my Shire horses which I found a bit too big - but I should have done my homework first!

 

Another lovely job, the way you chop up the figures,two legs and four, to get the right posture is a real inspiration, and the load looks good, too.

 

Many thanks North, there is nothing in this world that can't be modified - which is why modelling isn't really under threat from the increasing accuracy of ready to purchase products, in my opinion :-)

Regarding the use of the word "waggon" I prefer to maintain Old Engish whenever possible in descriptions ( ok call me old fashioned :) ) but I'm of the school where if these words and descriptions aren't used they could possibly be lost forever. The word was mainly used throughout the 18c into the 19c when it progressively became shortened until we have the common usage today. Yours Ann Edwardian :)

 

Thanks for clarifying that Grahame. I anticipate a major onslaught on how we spell things in the years to come, as the current text and chat generations grow up!    

 

Are you compensating for a boyhood wish to become a surgeon, Mikkel?  I do like the variety you introduce by manipulating commercial figures.  Your illustration of different trolleys also makes it clear that dimensional differences of a few inches are irrelevant, when modelling such vehicles.

 

Your loads are very attractive as well but, if you are going to add any roping, I feel the need for some fore and aft restraint - these boxes look in danger of tumbling off what I think is called the tailboard.

 

I like the modular concept too, as a means of allowing variety and different running periods.  I think KNP uses the idea on Little Muddle to some extent.

 

I'm still wondering what's in those sacks that I can see, lurking in the background on the last photo in your post :)

 

Hi Mike, many thanks and good of you to provide the word for tailboard, I was wondering what the term was! I did initially add a rope providing fore/aft restraint as you put it, but didn't like the look of it (certain things look wrong to me in model form). I then checked various images and noted that there was suprisingly little roping on horse drawn wagons in that respect, except when the loads were actually overhanging the tailboard. I may revisit it for my next load though. 

 

Superb modelling Mikkel, everything looks right, the pose of the figures, the colour pallet, the tone.

Simply lovely and well observed.

 

Thanks very much Angus. I'm glad you like the colours and tone as I put some effort into that. I'm trying to help set the period by using goods that aren't took bright and is made from natural products.

 

Just been admiring your LNWR carriages, really nice work!

Terrific stuff yet again Mikkel.

Love the way you modify the nags head not just the people’s head!

Superb modelling as always... :good:

 

Thanks Pete, the next step will be a Centaur. But then again, maybe not!

 

More brilliance from the master. Lovely work.

 

Thanks very much Mike. Looking at Kevin's recent lorry scene makes me want to start over though! 

 

Ah, yes, two posts I missed.  It is inspirational, especially the figures.  When I get some modelling time, and I have finished my coaches. 

 

I assume the children have moved out and you do not want them coming back!  :-)  We downsized to a smaller house.  I told my wife it was not big enough as she likes to have all three of our lads round at Christmas.  Fortunately one lives locally but the other two families could not fit in our house on their own.  I am struggling to get my layout up.  I need to get my two eldest grandchildren on to it, "Nana, I really want to play with the railway."

 

Hi Chris, fingers crossed you will get some modelling time soon.

 

Yes, the children are now out, but we will actually be moving closer to them. I hope they don't mind too much! Downsizing is a bigger challenge that I thought it would be. And packing all the model railway stuff is turning out to be quite a task in itself! 

Mikkle

 

As usual just stunning work

 

Many thanks Paul. It's rather small progress compared to the sizeable townscape you are building though!

Welcome to Farthing!

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This blog chronicles the building of "The Farthing layouts", a series of small OO layouts that portray different sections of a GWR junction station in Edwardian days.

 

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The trials of Mr Bull
A most implausible arrival
A parcel for Mr Ahern
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The Remains of the Day
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Gallery (1914)
All in a day's work, Part 1
All in a day's work, Part 2
All in a day's work, Part 3
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Short trains for short layouts
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Low-tech coach restoration (2)
Low-tech coach restoration (3)
Low-tech coach restoration (4)
Low-tech coach restoration (5)

 

Wagons
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3 plank Open in GWR red
Outside Framed 8 Ton Van

In the red: GWR 1900s wagon liveries
In loving memory...
Scratchbuilt GWR one-plank wagon (1)
Scratchbuilt GWR one-plank wagon (2)
MSWJR 3-plank dropside
LSWR 10 ton sliding door van
SDJR Road Van
LSWR stone wagon
Fake news and wagon sheets
Same but different: 1900s wagons

 

Locos
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GWR 1854 Saddle Tank (2)
Shiny domes and safety valve covers
Backdating the Oxford Dean Goods (1)

 

Horse-drawn
GWR large flat dray
Ratkin & Son horse-drawn wagon
Kit-bashed GWR light dray
GWR horse-drawn trolley
GWR 5-ton horse-drawn wagon
Parcels van and coal trolley

 

Goods
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HO figures for an OO layout
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Shunting Puzzle
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A roof for "The depot"

A tall bird from Paddington
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Constructing the Old Yard
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Wagon propulsion
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A shed and a lock-up
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Kicking back in Gloucester

 

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