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About this blog

A record of weathering work, intended to show both good and bad results, including explanations of what is used and how.

Entries in this blog

 

There's a first time for everything.

Exploring the blog concept with a view to maintaining a record of weathering processes, materials, tools and techniques. Entries will be sporadic and entirely dependent upon time and memory.

Mick Bonwick

Mick Bonwick

Sunbeam Talbot 90 - Rather Rusty. The Beginning and The End.

Sunbeam Talbot 90 - Rather Rusty. The Beginning and The End.

Another 1/43rd model, by Oxford Diecast.   Back in the days when cars were cars and boys were boys, I spent my time car spotting. Trains had no interest for me, where I lived they were all green and electric. One of the cars I drooled over was the Sunbeam Talbot 90, and when Oxford Diecast brought out their model of it in 7mm scale, I just had to have one.   This is what it looks like out of the box:     This is what it will look like at the end:  

Mick Bonwick

Mick Bonwick

 

Sunbeam Talbot 90 - Rather Rusty. Step 5 - Windows.

Even though the car is pretty grotty, I thought that the driver might make an effort to keep the windows clean. Clean white spirit has been used to remove the Dullcote layer. Soaking a cocktail stick (wooden variety) in the white spirit will allow a gentle rubbing action to gradually remove the dried Dullcote a little at a time, and if you don't go right into the corners it can leave an accumulation of 'dirt' there. The tiny flakes that will be left adhering to the plastic windows through static

Mick Bonwick

Mick Bonwick

 

Sunbeam Talbot 90 - Rather Rusty. Step 4 - Pigment 2.

The second application of pigment is AK Interactive Dark Earth. This has been used to represent areas of bodywork where rust is only just starting to show through the paintwork, and also to impart a dusty appearance to the whole model. Note that it has been used on some of the chromed areas (bumpers and hubcaps) to give the impression of rust taking hold. Application was achieved with the filbert brush.      

Mick Bonwick

Mick Bonwick

 

Sunbeam Talbot 90 - Rather Rusty. Step 4 - Pigment 1.

The Dullcote has presented a nice matt surface for the next stage - pigment application. The aim is to use two colours to represent various rust tones. Well, two, at least!   The first one is MIG Productions Track Brown, now marketed as Abteilung 502 Track Rust. It is used here to augment the rust spots by creating a larger rusty area with surface rust just starting.  

Mick Bonwick

Mick Bonwick

Sunbeam Talbot 90 - Rather Rusty. Step 3 - Removing the Shine.

Sunbeam Talbot 90 - Rather Rusty. Step 3 - Removing the Shine.

The application of rusty areas is now finished. Some of the more obvious blobs of wash have been either removed or significantly diminished in appearance. Simple wiping with a damp (white spirit) rigger brush, holding the bristles as flat to the surface as possible, will achieve this. The model was left to dry for an hour or so (measured in coffee consumption at the rate of one every 30 minutes) and then given a generous coat of Testor's Dullcote from an aerosol can. This part of the process ach

Mick Bonwick

Mick Bonwick

Sunbeam Talbot 90 - Rather Rusty. Step 2 - Rust Spots.

Sunbeam Talbot 90 - Rather Rusty. Step 2 - Rust Spots.

For some time now I have been meaning to have a go with a microbrush. I'm sure they've been on sale for years, and been used by thousands of modellers for all sorts of useful things, but I've never had a go. Until now. By applying a very small amount of wash from the tip of the rigger brush, I was able to just about colour the tiny bristles of the microbrush. The tip was then poked carefully at areas of the car where I thought rust would form. I have no photograph of a rusty SunbeamTalbot 90 to

Mick Bonwick

Mick Bonwick

Sunbeam Talbot 90 - Rather Rusty. Step 1 - Wash.

Sunbeam Talbot 90 - Rather Rusty. Step 1 - Wash.

This topic will use an AMMO by Mig wash, Africa Korps Wash A.MIG-1001. Why? Because I have some and it has a red tinge to it, which I thought would work on a green vehicle.   The jar needed a good shaking and mixing before being applied because the pigment had separated from the carrier and there was a ridge of hardened paint around the inside of the lid. I obviously didn't heed my own advice the last time I used it, and didn't clean the top and rim before replacing the lid.  

Mick Bonwick

Mick Bonwick

 

Set 732. Summary.

A coat or two of Railmatch Frame Dirt mixed with Weathered Black has been airbrushed over the ends of each coach, graduating the colour from darker at the top to lighter at the bottom. No tiger stripes, just a gradual change of tone.   All but finished now, just remains to add some lighter colouring to the footboards where feet fall. I'll use MIG Productions Rubbel (sic) Dust for that - just a touch applied with a filbert brush.  

Mick Bonwick

Mick Bonwick

 

Set 732. Step 6.

The roof has been airbrushed with a mixture of Railmatch Weathered Black and Roof Dirt to represent a well-used example. Care was taken to avoid paintless shadows behind the torpedo vents by painting those areas first. Only once the vents and surrounding roof were painted did the process move on to the remainder of the roof.   If airbrushing the roof of a ready-to-run coach, when the roof is not easily removed, a card mask can be used to protect the sides from overspray while this is being don

Mick Bonwick

Mick Bonwick

 

Set 732. Step 5.

When the whole underframe had been airbrushed it looked too pale, so I added some Railmatch Weathered Black to the mixture and airbrushed a thin coat of the new colour combination over the top of the previous layer. In this photograph you ought to be able to see that the left hand end of the chassis looks a bit darker than the right hand end, which has yet to be completed.   The roof has been removed for painting, something which is not usually possible with ready to run coaches. With these tw

Mick Bonwick

Mick Bonwick

 

Set 732. Step 4

A recycled piece of protective foam strip from a worktop is used while airbrushing the underframe. This helps access to the inside underframe details on the opposite side of the coach to the one I'm painting.   The whole of the underframe will now be treated to a thin coat of Railmatch Sleeper Grime, starting with the bogies. The air flow from the airbrush is used to turn the wheels and paint is then ejected for long enough to coat the whole wheel as it turns.  

Mick Bonwick

Mick Bonwick

 

Set 732. Step 3.

The application of dark wash to panel edges has been allowed to dry for at least 15 minutes. You can see from the photographs below that the colour has lightened and the white spirit has evaporated.   To remove blobs and other unwanted paint after application surpluses, I use the rigger brush dipped in clean white spirit and gently lay the bristles as flat as I can against the areas to be treated. By moving the tip of the brush around, I can absorb the only-just-dry paint from the appropriate

Mick Bonwick

Mick Bonwick

 

Set 732. Step 2.

The process continues. When hardly any fluid transfers from the brush to the panel corner, it is time to replenish the brush with thinner and wash. However hard you try there will inevitably be blobs appearing in some of the panel corners. Leave them! They can be dealt with later - at least 15 minutes later. Don't worry (at this stage) about uneven application, either, it will all be sorted in a subsequent step.  

Mick Bonwick

Mick Bonwick

 

Set 732. Step 1.

A rigger brush, a thin wash and capillary action are all used to get dirt into all the edges and corners of panels, doors and windows. By dipping the brush into clean thinners (white spirit) and then into the wash (MIG Productions Dark Wash), a good volume of fluid is ready to be transferred onto the model. The inevitable large blob on the end of the brush is removed by touching the tip against the rim of the bottle and the tip is then gently touched to a corner of a panel or junction of door sh

Mick Bonwick

Mick Bonwick

 

Set 732. Introduction.

Set 732 is to be depicted as a BR(S) liveried pull-push pair fairly late in the life of its green livery. An example of similar stock was found in a Michael Welch book containing many images of the southern region at the end of steam.   The plan, such as it is, is to produce a weathered pair of coaches that shows a build-up of dirt around panel and window edges, a very dirty underframe and roof, but cleanly maintained sides.   The dirt build-up will be achieved using MIG Productions Dark Was

Mick Bonwick

Mick Bonwick

 

Quick Advertisement.

D3721 and Peckett No. 883 will be at the Hornby Magazine Great Electric Train Show this weekend, so if you plan on going, come and see how/if they differ from the photographs.       Look for a bloke doing weathering demonstrations. Point and snigger all you like, he won't mind He'll have his back to you.

Mick Bonwick

Mick Bonwick

 

Peckett W4 No. 883. Temporary Diversion.

Before starting work on this locomotive I decided to remove the rather large supplied couplings. My original intention was to simply have no couplings at all, but then I noticed that there is a coupling hook on both buffer beams, albeit grossly over scale. A delve into a box labelled 'Couplings', that hasn't been opened for years (because it contains, mainly, supplied couplings from RTR rolling stock) revealed the presence of a couple of packets of Roger Smith unassembled 3-link couplings. A qui

Mick Bonwick

Mick Bonwick

 

Peckett W4 No. 883. Step 9.

Final step. Some Mig Productions Dark Mud has been added to the firebox sides that show through the frames under the cab to represent the rusty state of that area, but it's difficult to see in photographs. The whole locomotive has been subjected to cleaning up and running tests to make sure that all pickup surfaces are clear of paint. This is achieved by wiping the surfaces with a Tamiya cotton swab dipped into isopropyl alcohol, which will remove even hardened enamel paint. Wheels were turned w

Mick Bonwick

Mick Bonwick

 

Peckett W4 No. 883. Step 8.

To represent soot and other associated grime that falls on horizontal surfaces, I have used Mig Productions Black Smoke pigment, applied with a filbert brush, where appropriate. This means cab roof, top of boiler, running plate, tool boxes, etc. The previous layer of Black Night PLW has helped this pigment to 'stick' to these surfaces.     I have also applied a small amount of Black Night to enhance the dirt buildup on the buffer beams.  

Mick Bonwick

Mick Bonwick

 

Peckett W4 No. 883. Step 7.

The saddle tank on this model is a hefty lump of metal, but still well detailed. In order to emphasise the uneven surface of the tank, I have used T-Cut applied with small cotton swabs to create the shine. Yet again, only small quantities have been applied, and the result is a nicely subdued shine that has proved extremely difficult to photograph successfully.  

Mick Bonwick

Mick Bonwick

 

Peckett W4 No. 883. Step 7.

Areas like the chimney, cab roof, firebox door, pipes and running plate will be dirty to some degree, even on a well-maintained locomotive. For this subject I have prepared these surfaces with some brush-on AMMO by mig Panel Line Wash (PLW) Black Night. This fluid is a very thin enamel paint, basically, and has a very small content of pigment compared with carrier. I have used it here to introduce a small build-up of dirt around the chimney top and base, the cab roof, the pipework and the runnin

Mick Bonwick

Mick Bonwick

 

Peckett W4 No. 883. Step 6.

The paint finish on this model as supplied is very good, but satin. The idea with the weathering to be done is to present a well looked after locomotive, so the satin finish needs to be altered to a shiny one, but not uniformly so. The cab sides and bunker have been polished with a gentle application of isopropyl alcohol (IPA) on a Tamiya cotton swab. These swabs are very tightly bound and shaped, the ones that I normally use being pointed at the tip. This shape allows me to be quite precise wit

Mick Bonwick

Mick Bonwick

 

Peckett W4 No. 883. Step 5.

It's all been left to dry properly for 36 hours.   To represent well worn but properly maintained underparts, a layer of AK Interactive Fresh Engine Oil has been brushed onto the rods and wheels. This fluid has some strange characteristics in that it will react with not-quite-dry enamels and make them wrinkly (maybe I should not get quite so close to the bottle in future ). Once again, to keep the applied layer even and consistent, the wheels were rotated during the process with the PP9 batt

Mick Bonwick

Mick Bonwick

 

Peckett W4 No. 883. Step 4.

With the model still in its foam cradle I have airbrushed some more Sleeper Grime onto the buffer beams. I left it to dry for 15-20 minutes (time for a coffee) and then started to remove the paint with a damp brush. The brush is not dampened by dipping it into thinners, but by placing a couple of drops of thinners onto the bristles with a disposable pipette. The combination of not-quite-dry paint and slightly damp brush gives a lot of control over how much paint is removed. With the use of light

Mick Bonwick

Mick Bonwick

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