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About this blog

A record of weathering work, intended to show both good and bad results, including explanations of what is used and how.

Entries in this blog

Bachmann VAA (Maroon) 200119. Step 2 - Dirtying.

Bachmann VAA (Maroon) 200119. Step 2 - Dirtying.

Now it's the turn of the MIG Dark Wash, used in the airbrush without any thinners, but at 25psi. Once again, a thin coat, and then worked downwards immediately with a dry 1/2" flat shader brush. This will leave an accumulation of 'dirt' just above all of the horizontal ridges and tone down the previously applied ComArt Light Dust. If necessary, the downward movement can be applied several times to achieve the required result.     No attempt was made to mask underframe or roo

Mick Bonwick

Mick Bonwick

Bachmann VAA (Maroon) 200119. Step 1 - Fading.

Bachmann VAA (Maroon) 200119. Step 1 - Fading.

The ComArt paint is advertised as airbrush ready, but I've still thinned it down a little with a few drops of acrylic thinner from Ultimate. This product is usable with all acrylic paints including Tamiya. Applied from an Iwata Eclipse CS airbrush set to 20 psi, putting 3 very fine coats on and not bothering to wait between coats because it dries so fast. If you look closely at the finish, it's very grainy, but that will not be a problem because there is much more work to be done, which will dis

Mick Bonwick

Mick Bonwick

Bachmann VAA (Maroon) 200119. Introduction.

Bachmann VAA (Maroon) 200119. Introduction.

Similar vehicle in that it is a van. Otherwise it has a different body, different chassis, different livery and different payload!   This time the fading will be done first, using ComArt Light Dust, and then the dirtying will start.     The only work done on the model from the box is the removal of the couplings.

Mick Bonwick

Mick Bonwick

Bachmann COV AB / VDA van. A Change of Plan.

Bachmann COV AB / VDA van. A Change of Plan.

Having been shown the error of my ways by not fading the van before starting, I shall be embarking on another project where I do fade first. This project was completed as an exercise in using the MIG Dark Wash in all sorts of ways to represent a grimy COV AB.     The roof has been airbrushed with slightly thinned wash, applied as four thin coats and left to dry between each coat. This resulted in a very soft texture that was easily but not completely removed, leaving a sligh

Mick Bonwick

Mick Bonwick

Bachmann COV AB / VDA van. Step 1. A Thin Wash.

Bachmann COV AB / VDA van. Step 1. A Thin Wash.

The previously illustrated MIG Dark Wash has been applied from an airbrush as three VERY thin coats. This was achieved by thinning the already thin wash with white spirit and spraying from about 20cm away. The discolouration achieved each time was barely visible, but you should be able to see from this photograph that the wash has collected on the edges of moulded detail in much the same way as dirt would fall on the real thing.  

Mick Bonwick

Mick Bonwick

Bachmann COV AB / VDA van. Preparation.

Bachmann COV AB / VDA van. Preparation.

The plan is to use a dark wash and a couple of pigments to replicate as much of the dirt as possible that can be seen in the photograph. There may need to be some additions as I progress, but they will be identified as and when appropriate.      

Mick Bonwick

Mick Bonwick

Bachmann COV AB / VDA van. Introduction.

Bachmann COV AB / VDA van. Introduction.

The subject has been chosen and a colour photograph found to work from. Bachmann produced several livery versions of the 29 ton sliding door box van (COV AB, later VDA )and this one (38-141) is in Railfreight livery, numbered 200077. Paul Bartlett has many photographs of these on his website, and has given his permission for this photograph to be used in this blog.     The challenges are: Fade the reddish shade of brown to show age and wear Highlight areas of

Mick Bonwick

Mick Bonwick

 

December - a statement of intent . . . . . . .

Modelling commitments for December are minimal (a bit of planning was involved), so there should be plenty of time to work on another subject. He said, confidently.   One suggestion received involved a modern image van, VDA or similar, so I've found one in a box and will now look out for some suitable photographs to work from. There will be hundreds, if not thousands, on the Internet for me to investigate, so I'll just have to knuckle down and get to work on the keyboard.   Just to add a lit

Mick Bonwick

Mick Bonwick

A Land Rover Series 1 of indeterminate length. Step 9. Summary.

A Land Rover Series 1 of indeterminate length. Step 9. Summary.

That's all I plan to do with this subject, remembering that it was an exercise in weathering for as little cost as possible/practical.   I have attempted to clear an area of windscreen where the wiper would have cleaned, but on reflection (!) that was not such a good idea. The wheels were only made muddy on one side.     Just for comparison, the topic started here:   http://www.rmweb.co.uk/community/index.php?/blog/2349/entry-21469-a-land-rover-seri

Mick Bonwick

Mick Bonwick

A Land Rover Series 1 of indeterminate length. Step 8. Wheels again.

A Land Rover Series 1 of indeterminate length. Step 8. Wheels again.

The front wheel and wheel arch have been further treated to show the effects of recently collected mud. In the case of the wheel hub, a dry brush was used to pick off some of the white spirit-infused pigment before the mixture had dried. This excess was wiped off on a paper towel, and the remaining trace of pigment on the brush tip just gently touched onto the wing surface, leaving a trace of discolouration thereon. The rubbed appearance on the tyre sidewall was done by rubbing the thin layer of

Mick Bonwick

Mick Bonwick

A Land Rover Series 1 of indeterminate length. Step 7. Windows.

A Land Rover Series 1 of indeterminate length. Step 7. Windows.

The glazing is currently covered in a coat of Dullcote, so the driver and any passengers who might be present will have difficulty seeing where they are going. Not to worry, the trusty cocktail stick is close by. A wooden cocktail stick will absorb white spirit, and white spirit can be used to remove even hardened Dullcote from glazing without doing any damage. As long as the cocktail stick is gently rubbed against the glazing using the side of the tip rather than the point of the tip, a clear p

Mick Bonwick

Mick Bonwick

A Land Rover Series 1 of indeterminate length. Step 6. Muddy wheels.

A Land Rover Series 1 of indeterminate length. Step 6. Muddy wheels.

In 7mm scale and larger, it is quite reasonable to use pigments to add texture without the look achieved being overdone. In the case of our Land Rover, pigment can be used to replicate accumulated mud on the wheels. A generous (for a change) amount of pigment is collected from the pot and deposited on the wheel hub, having supported the model on its side (hence the strange viewing angle).     When happy with the general arrangement of the pigment pile, a drop of white spirit

Mick Bonwick

Mick Bonwick

A Land Rover Series 1 of indeterminate length. Step 5. Pigment.

A Land Rover Series 1 of indeterminate length. Step 5. Pigment.

The key to successful appearance when using pigments is to apply small quantities at a time. This approach allows the gradual build-up of colour and texture, so that the subject is not overwhelmed. My technique involves the following steps: Make sure that the lid of the container is properly screwed on Give the container a brief shake Tap the container firmly on the work surface Open the container and inspect the inside of the lid/cap, where you should see a thin fil

Mick Bonwick

Mick Bonwick

A Land Rover Series 1 of indeterminate length. Step 4. Dullcote.

A Land Rover Series 1 of indeterminate length. Step 4. Dullcote.

Once all the wash areas have been tidied up, the Dullcote can be applied. My preference is to use the aerosol can, but there is another method, which is to use it from the bottle. Whether it is applied by bristle brush or airbrush it will need thinning, which requires cellulose thinners. I am not a fan of cellulose for anything to do with weathering, because I consider it unnecessary in that context. The effect of the toluene in aerosol Dullcote can be minimised by applying it outside in the fre

Mick Bonwick

Mick Bonwick

A Land Rover Series 1 of indeterminate length. Step 3. Tidy Up.

A Land Rover Series 1 of indeterminate length. Step 3. Tidy Up.

Once the model has been left to dry for a short while (15 to 20 minutes) the cleaning up can begin. For models to 4mm and below scales I normally use the rigger brush slightly dampened with thinners for this operation, but with models as large as this, with larger areas to clean up, I use a very tightly bound cotton bud (intended for make-up rather than babies) without thinners. If I need to get into tight corners (such as the small panels on the cab roof on this model) then I will use the rigge

Mick Bonwick

Mick Bonwick

A Land Rover Series 1 of indeterminate length. Step 2. Wash.

A Land Rover Series 1 of indeterminate length. Step 2. Wash.

The first thing done with high gloss diecast models is to add the wash, if dirty areas are to be depicted. It's done at this stage because enamel washes work very well on a high gloss surface. Using the rigger brush and my trusty Mig Productions Dark Wash (because I can't find the one I bought to do the original Land Rover!) I've added fluid to all the corners, edges, lumps and bumps to highlight detail and prepare for dirty areas. Note that there are many blobs and runs that look a right mess.

Mick Bonwick

Mick Bonwick

A Land Rover Series 1 of indeterminate length. Step 1.

A Land Rover Series 1 of indeterminate length. Step 1.

Diecast models have a high gloss finish when new, which is absolutely no use when you need to apply pigments (weathering powders). The solution is to apply a layer of something to present a matt finish for the pigment to 'stick' to. Why is the word 'stick' in quotation marks? Because the fine particles of powder fall into the valleys in the surface of the matt finish rather than stick to it. A gloss finish is smooth and reflects light, which is why it appears shiny, whereas a matt finish is roug

Mick Bonwick

Mick Bonwick

A Land Rover Series 1 of indeterminate length. Bonus Photograph.

A Land Rover Series 1 of indeterminate length. Bonus Photograph.

Subsequent to the decision to weather a Land Rover, it occurred to me that it could be incorporated into a diorama. The vehicle operator states that Massey Ferguson tractors are sold and serviced, so a situation that incorporated a Land Rover and a Massey Ferguson tractor was envisaged.   The weathering process for the tractor was no different to that for the Land Rover, except for a little bit of glossy stuff here and there.  

Mick Bonwick

Mick Bonwick

A Land Rover Series 1 109" (According to Oxford Diecast). Introduction.

A Land Rover Series 1 109" (According to Oxford Diecast). Introduction.

Ever since failing my driving test for the second time, in a Land Rover in Cyprus (exotic lifestyle!), I have had a soft spot for the machines. When at Railex in 2017 I found an Oxford Diecast 1/43rd version and decided to use it for a minimum cost weathering exercise.   The idea was to spend as little as possible to weather this model, but end up with the wherewithal to continue weathering as many more models as possible with the materials purchased. My purchases were:   Tes

Mick Bonwick

Mick Bonwick

Peckett W4 No. 883. Step 9.

Peckett W4 No. 883. Step 9.

Final step. Some Mig Productions Dark Mud has been added to the firebox sides that show through the frames under the cab to represent the rusty state of that area, but it's difficult to see in photographs. The whole locomotive has been subjected to cleaning up and running tests to make sure that all pickup surfaces are clear of paint. This is achieved by wiping the surfaces with a Tamiya cotton swab dipped into isopropyl alcohol, which will remove even hardened enamel paint. Wheels were turned w

Mick Bonwick

Mick Bonwick

Peckett W4 No. 883. Step 8.

Peckett W4 No. 883. Step 8.

To represent soot and other associated grime that falls on horizontal surfaces, I have used Mig Productions Black Smoke pigment, applied with a filbert brush, where appropriate. This means cab roof, top of boiler, running plate, tool boxes, etc. The previous layer of Black Night PLW has helped this pigment to 'stick' to these surfaces.     I have also applied a small amount of Black Night to enhance the dirt buildup on the buffer beams.  

Mick Bonwick

Mick Bonwick

Peckett W4 No. 883. Step 7.

Peckett W4 No. 883. Step 7.

Areas like the chimney, cab roof, firebox door, pipes and running plate will be dirty to some degree, even on a well-maintained locomotive. For this subject I have prepared these surfaces with some brush-on AMMO by mig Panel Line Wash (PLW) Black Night. This fluid is a very thin enamel paint, basically, and has a very small content of pigment compared with carrier. I have used it here to introduce a small build-up of dirt around the chimney top and base, the cab roof, the pipework and the runnin

Mick Bonwick

Mick Bonwick

Quick Advertisement.

Quick Advertisement.

D3721 and Peckett No. 883 will be at the Hornby Magazine Great Electric Train Show this weekend, so if you plan on going, come and see how/if they differ from the photographs.       Look for a bloke doing weathering demonstrations. Point and snigger all you like, he won't mind He'll have his back to you.

Mick Bonwick

Mick Bonwick

Peckett W4 No. 883. Step 7.

Peckett W4 No. 883. Step 7.

The saddle tank on this model is a hefty lump of metal, but still well detailed. In order to emphasise the uneven surface of the tank, I have used T-Cut applied with small cotton swabs to create the shine. Yet again, only small quantities have been applied, and the result is a nicely subdued shine that has proved extremely difficult to photograph successfully.  

Mick Bonwick

Mick Bonwick

Peckett W4 No. 883. Step 6.

Peckett W4 No. 883. Step 6.

The paint finish on this model as supplied is very good, but satin. The idea with the weathering to be done is to present a well looked after locomotive, so the satin finish needs to be altered to a shiny one, but not uniformly so. The cab sides and bunker have been polished with a gentle application of isopropyl alcohol (IPA) on a Tamiya cotton swab. These swabs are very tightly bound and shaped, the ones that I normally use being pointed at the tip. This shape allows me to be quite precise wit

Mick Bonwick

Mick Bonwick

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