Jump to content
  • entries
    30
  • comments
    57
  • views
    20,634

About this blog

West of Exeter and east of Penzance

Entries in this blog

Building the Churchward 45xx Part Nine

Right. Return to action after a heavy cold, family matters and cleaning up weekends which have stolen the time.   Now I’ve completely cream crackered the drilling of holes in the cab rear it’s a matter of cutting out a new set from 10thou brass – or shall I use nickel-silver?   This is just like Brian Williams had to do as reported in MRJ Compendium 3.   I consider myself in good company.   Be back when I can actually show some progress. And it’s a good job I have a squad of piercing saw

Coombe Barton

Coombe Barton

Building the Churchward 45xx Part Eight

Cab Rear   The cab rear windows have had their etched bars cut and filed out and the whole thing filed smooth. Now it’s time to mark out the positions of the holes where I’m going to fit the replacements. Marking out that accurately will be a problem unless I employ some subterfuge. So a scan of the GA drawing cab rear, a printing out and then measuring to find out how much to reduce the image, then doing that, then reversing the image so we get the other cab side then you get this. And then I

Coombe Barton

Coombe Barton

Building the Churchward 45xx Part Seven

Cab   Right, so it’s the cab. Enquiries on a thread have produced answers that help. What the people answering didn’t know was that I can quite successfully bu99er up their suggestions and delay delivery of the necessary wire to complete the cab rear. So now I’m going to cut out the necessary bits to dry fit them on to what’s already built. Or may be to cut out another set from brass. We’ll see.   The inside of the back of the cab, Seats and coal door in place.   A bit of thought first h

Coombe Barton

Coombe Barton

Building the Churchward 45xx Part Six

The Cab   This week’s purchase was an A4 cutting mat from The Works for three quid. This may seem a little unnecessary as I’ve already got a couple of A2 size, one atop the workbench and one for extra space. I did notice that as I was cutting small items off the frets and cutting up solder that one small area was getting significantly more wear then the rest, so an A4 mat chopped into an A5 and two A6 portions will allow me to chop and discard when necessary. OK, I could just buy another A2 bu

Coombe Barton

Coombe Barton

Building the Churchward 45xx Part Five

Nuts   I said – “The next bits are the 8BA nuts to secure the body to the chassis. Must remember to open out the holes to take the bolts BEFORE soldering on the nuts.”   Then I changed my mind. Instead of opening out the hole to clearance I opened the holes to the tapping size approximately with a broach – this way you can centre up the nut more closely and then run a tap through it to allow the bolt to go through. I have been equipping with tools over the past few years – blame Guy Williams

Coombe Barton

Coombe Barton

Building the Churchward 45xx Part Four

Buffer Beams   I’m glad I’m keeping this blog – saves me having to remember which bit comes next. However finding the right place in the instructions and the correct bits is another matter ...   So buffer beams. This model is of one of those built with full length frames, so there’s no fiddling with the appearance of modifications. However the instructions tell you how to bend things for the shorter frames, but does not tell you what do for the longer frames. Studying a pic of 4564 suggests

Coombe Barton

Coombe Barton

Building the Churchward 45xx Part Three

More on the footplate   Right, so the cleanup.   The brass is usually attacked with a glass fibre brush and that’s quite quick. For excess solder I use gravers. First found out about them from Eileen’s but bought from somewhere else when I was buying other tools (where they cost less) and mounted them in a couple of Axminster file handles. I use the ones made from 1.5mm and 2.5mm square section. A graver is simply a scraper with which you can get into the right angle and get the excess solde

Coombe Barton

Coombe Barton

Building the Churchward 45xx Part Two

Soldering the footplate laminates.   Flux   Now there’s a lot written about fluxes. A lot of people swear by this, that or the other flux, all with secret recipes. Some of the most respected people in the field say phosphoric acid, 9% or 12% for more challenging metals, going to as low as 7% or lower for whitemetal. Iain Rice has information on this in Rice, I. (1990). Etched Loco Construction. Didcot: Wild Swan Publications. p. 31.   Now fluxes are hard to post and running out on a Sunday

Coombe Barton

Coombe Barton

Building the Churchward 45xx Part One

Churchward 45xx   It’s about time. I’ve had this kit for about a year. And seeing threads such as A Nod To Brent, Wencombe, Mayhill, Salcombe and, just yesterday, Western Diversion have all prompted me to get up off my ars backside and start.   So what is it? One of the last, if not THE last, 45xx 4mm Churchward 45xx kit sold by Modelex, just before the range went to Phoenix Precision. At the time of writing no 4mm kits and just one 7mm 45xx kits are listed on the Phoenix Precision website.

Coombe Barton

Coombe Barton

Building Resources - Thatching Links

Building Resources - Thatching Links   Thatching resources - inspired to add by scanman of this parish   Thatching from Building Conservation Long Straw Thatching Thatching Gallery Thatch in England

Coombe Barton

Coombe Barton

Buckland Hard - Frames

Buckland Hard - Frames   The frames that I've managed to rescue appear to be beech - but they're quite light, but well seasoned and strong. The layout is divided into two 3ft by 15inch boards, each with integral backscene, sidewall and top.     This is a schematic of the left hand frame, the right hand one being nearly a mirror image. Because of the nature of the wood and the position in the house, on permanent display, the framing wood will be waxed and polished rather than painted. Lig

Coombe Barton

Coombe Barton

Buckland Hard

Buckland Hard   I want a test track – I want to try out building styles and materials – Scalescenes stuff needs experimentation – but above all I need to have somewhere to run something without mounting the whole layout while I get the stock built.   But I also want to have somewhere to play.   Buckland Hard is part of the fiction of the passing of the Buckland Regis and Coombe Barton Railway Act in 1853. Both lie along the River Sether (look up a Cornish dictionary if you’re

Coombe Barton

Coombe Barton

Building Resources - Cornwall Conservation Area Character Appraisals.

Conservation Area Character Appraisals and Management Plans   In the links below many more areas are designated as conservation areas - but those listed are the only ones with character appraisals.   Appraisals look at:   The history of the buildings Topography and landscape setting Settlement form Important views and vistas Locally distinctive features and vernacular building styles Past and present activities and uses Streetscape and the public realm Green spaces and trees

Coombe Barton

Coombe Barton

Building Resources - Devon Conservation Area Character Appraisals.

These documents are recent and give plenty of detail about the coonservation area. More importantly they usually give plenty of high quality photographs.   I've linked to the man websites where I can, but some of the detail is proving elusive. I will update as and when I can.   Each is arranged by the authority carrying out the appraisal. After each authority is the list of areas covered.   Dartmoor National Park Authority   Ashburton, Buckfastleigh, Chagford, Crockernwell, Drewsteignt

Coombe Barton

Coombe Barton

Historical Resources - Cornwall Industrial Settlements Initiative

I've been collecting resources for years about Devon and Cornwall for purposes other than modelling. I've been using them for modelling research so sharing them seems the natural thing to do. Many of them in Cornwall may suffer webdeath because of the new Unitary Authority - these are based on the post 1974 districts.   All links are to the CISI or CSUS (Cornwall & Scilly Urban Survey) sites.   Main CISI map Main CSUS Map Penwith   St Just Nancherrow-Tregeseal Botallack Carny

Coombe Barton

Coombe Barton

Starting at the Wrong End - building the control panel first

Control Panels   At some recent exhibitions I’ve been looking at the control panels people have been using. Some are almost as large as the layout they control. Others are a tad smaller. Most are maps of the system. So in my perverse way what better to start designing the layout than with the control panel.   The design of Coombe Barton requires that the control panel is incorporated within the layout, hence why I’m starting with it. And the room taken up by said control panel will deter

Coombe Barton

Coombe Barton

Anti Spill Bunds for Fluids - saving the carpet and the wrath

The Bunds   So the anti spill in plastic caused problems. Especially with plastic solvents. To be expected, wasn’t it?   Yes, well ...   So this time a visit to Pets at Home (the dogs sent me, actually, to get them some treats) to get a couple of £1.59 stainless steel dog bowls. Small ones will do – you only need to use them as a bund in the most extreme circumstances so the volume needs be over twice that of the largest bottle/tin you’re going to put in them. They’re for stabili

Coombe Barton

Coombe Barton

The Obligatory Workbench - building one in the first place

Coombe Barton Workbench   For the past twenty five years I've been using half of an old church notice board as a modelling workbench. However age as taken its toll and the ply is seriously delaminating. So this is the construction of a replacement. I can now incorporate features that will make life easier that I'd neglected to do for the past quarter century.   I've been using the modelling workbench for a whole variety of things, sometimes including railway modelling. However from the model

Coombe Barton

Coombe Barton

Slight change of plan

Measure twice, cut once, they say.   This one fell at the 'measure once' stage.   The layout was designed to have four boards 3' 6" long, 2ft wide and one 2' square. It's portable and would have to be stored, and the design takes care of this. It also has to fit in the back of the car, a Focus estate. That's where the problems come in - I made an assumption (which is the mother of all cocks ups). So now there are four boards 4' x 1'9", two mainly station, one mainly river and one fiddle.  

Coombe Barton

Coombe Barton

Signalling

Following a great deal of help from RMWeb members here http://www.rmweb.co....al-box-diagram/ and here http://www.rmweb.co....ease-crossover/, the signal box diagram is now finalised.     Levers 1 - Home 2 - FPL 3 - Main to loop and trap 4 - Main to goods 5 - Dummy main to goods 6 - Dummy main to loop 7 - Dummy loop to main 8 - Starter 9 - Adv starter 10 - Shunt 11 - Dummy from goods to main 12 - Spare 13 - Engine release 14 - Dummy for engine release   Lever 12 will control

Coombe Barton

Coombe Barton

Alex Jackson Uncoupling

Alex Jacksons   This is a schematic of the position of the electromagnets for uncoupling Alex Jacksons. That's as far as it's got apart from more component buying.  

Coombe Barton

Coombe Barton

And at last we get started - stock building.

Stock Building   Well, I've been buying, now all I have to do is build it.   Partially completed, left over from the last time I was modelling, are a Churchward 45xx, and a 14xx on a Perseverance chassis, and complete (00) Mainline 57xx and 2251 Collett goods. eBay has provided me with another 14xx body and bits, eBay also provided me with another Airfix autocoach. I can now build both an A30 and an A28 version. At Warley from Dart Castings I collected a Frogmore AA3 brake van.   The 57xx

Coombe Barton

Coombe Barton

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue.