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Portable test track


RichardW1

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A while back I mentioned that I had been busy making a portable test track. Two have been built, one for Peter Clark (who conceived the idea), and this one.

 

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Case closed.

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The basis is a cheap aluminium snooker cue case. The innards are ripped out, and replaced with a baulk of timber, on which the track is laid.

the overall case dimensions are 34" long, 3" wide 2"mm high. the internal timber is 2 1/2" x 3/4".- length to suit.

 

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Case open for business

 

I left the timber a bit short to give room for a 9V battery controller (Thektronics in my case), and a single length of track is glued in place. Job done.

 

For Peter's track, we made the infill board full length and double sided. Each track is wired to a standard power socket to allow a variety of controllers to be connected. For Peter the requirement was to have one side laid with 2mm FS standard gauge and a length of NN3, and the obverse laid with PECO N track and a length of Shinohara Code 40, also N.

 

There is plenty of space to fit other combinations- N one side, P4/EM the other.. do as you please.

 

The intrepid could fit other connectors for DCC or analogue power supply, switched via a DPDT for safety.....the options are limited only by your imagination.

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Nice idea. I'd like to know a bit more about your controller, particularly how 2mm/N scale locos perform with it.

 

I've tried building a battery controller myself using a Timpdon Electronics motor speed controller run from a PP3 battery (plus 2 AAs because that's what it needs). This works reasonably well with modern low friction mechanisms (pinpoint bearings and so on) but is much less happy with older Farish and Trix mechanisms.

 

Regards, Andy

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Nice idea. I'd like to know a bit more about your controller, particularly how 2mm/N scale locos perform with it.

 

I've tried building a battery controller myself using a Timpdon Electronics motor speed controller run from a PP3 battery (plus 2 AAs because that's what it needs). This works reasonably well with modern low friction mechanisms (pinpoint bearings and so on) but is much less happy with older Farish and Trix mechanisms.

 

Regards, Andy

Andy

The controller was recomended to me, from memory by either Mark Fielder of Tom Knapp- I obtained it via the internet from a US source- I can't remember the exact details, but a search for thektronics msy turn it up.

 

It works fine with N, 2mm, Z (NN3) mechanisms, it is very smooth. The max 9V means that it doesn't over run most motors. \\some of Nigel Lawtons small motors may be at risk, but that's another story.

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What a great idea! The next step would be to build a whole layout in there. An industrial siding with half-relief buildings maybe, and the backsene on the inside of the lid. Hmmm... :-) 

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What a great idea! The next step would be to build a whole layout in there. An industrial siding with half-relief buildings maybe, and the backsene on the inside of the lid. Hmmm... :-) 

 

As Richard said "the options are limited only by your own imagination".

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