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Weighbridge Hut

wenlock

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blog-0854554001394530664.jpgI'm afraid very little progress has been made with the track laying for my project, It's far too cold, wet and windy here in Wales at the moment to contemplate crossing the garden to the workshop! I decided that a smaller project that I could build in the warmth of the house was in order, at least until the weather perks up a bit.

 

I decided that a little weighbridge hut would look good near to the entrance of the yard and shouldn't take too long to complete. Once again I used Southeastern Finescale brick embossed plastic card as a building material.

 

Basic shell, with inlaid arch brickwork

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Internal bracing

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Decorative brickwork on chimney and cornice added

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Roof substructure added

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Slates added

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Ridge tiles added

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Base coat of brick red (Humbrol 100)

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Window and Door

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Mortar paint added

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The mortar paint was applied once the brick red had been dry for a couple of days. A dark grey colour was painted onto the surface of the building and left to dry for about an hour. Once this hour had passed a piece of kitchen roll soaked in enamel thinners was used to remove most of the paint from the surface of the bricks, leaving the dark grey in the mortar courses. In order to acheive a little variation in the final mortar colour, I repeated the previous procedure using a paler grey paint. A few random bricks were then picked out using the original brick colour as a base, but with the addition of oranges,greys and purples. The windows and door were glued in position and some flashing around the chimney was cut from writing paper and glued in place. a little strategic weathering was added here and there, along with some green enamel paint on some of the window bars to represent moss.

Once the building is in position on the layout, I'm planning on representing some ivy growing up the end wall and some moss on the roof slates.

 

I'm sure that at one of the modelling shows I've been to, I saw a very nice etched brass weighbridge plate for sale. Unfortunately I can't remember who it was, so if anyone could point me in the right direction I'd be very appreciative!

 

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In the time that it's taken to construct this little building, the weather has perked up considerably. There's definitely a hint of spring in the air, so I guess Ive run out of the excuses that have been stopping me from track laying at long last!

 

Best wishes

 

Dave

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For such a small, utilitarian building it's got bags of character. The SEF brick sheet is quite an improvement over the Slaters sheet, and during my current dead-time have been wondering about how to tackle the brick buildings on Basilica. I'd written off the Slaters and was considering scribed Das - time intensive, but unique. Seeing what a lovely job the SEF sheet can make of things I may now plump for SEF on large expanses and Das for any unique intricate bits.

 

Lovely colour to the bricks and mortar too.

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Very natty. I think that Smiths do a suitable weighbridge plate. I believe Wizard Models stock them.

 

Adam

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I hope that you do not mind the question...  how did you get from flat sheet to walls of a building?  Or maybe:- what forms the shell of the building and how did you attach the SEF?

 

regards Graham (apprentice bricklayer for Basilica Fields)

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Not only a super result but an excellent description of how you built it - a very useful and informative post. Thank you.

 

Mike

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Smiths (available from Scale Link/Shire Scenes) do etched weigh bridges in other scales, I don't know for sure about 7mm. I have their N/2mm ones stashed for later use.

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Hi Dave, what a lovely building, and  a very useful step by step demo (I've got one of these planned for Farthing, so thanks for that). Agree about the SEF sheets, the 4mm ones work well too, I think.

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Bloody hell, even his sheds are exquisite...

I hear down the grapevine, that you've an exquisite shed of your own Al!

 

 

For such a small, utilitarian building it's got bags of character. The SEF brick sheet is quite an improvement over the Slaters sheet, and during my current dead-time have been wondering about how to tackle the brick buildings on Basilica. I'd written off the Slaters and was considering scribed Das - time intensive, but unique. Seeing what a lovely job the SEF sheet can make of things I may now plump for SEF on large expanses and Das for any unique intricate bits.

 

Lovely colour to the bricks and mortar too.

Thanks Adrian, yes the SEF sheet gives much crisper results than the stuff from Slaters. I think the fact that SEF sheet comes in A3 rather than A4 size sheets, helps to minimise joins when doing 7mm buildings. Though it obviously wasn't a major consideration in this little building's case! I think for stonework, handscribing is definitely the way to go. However for brickwork, Flemish bond in partcular, I've decided life's too short!

 

Very natty. I think that Smiths do a suitable weighbridge plate. I believe Wizard Models stock them.

 

Adam

Thanks Adam, I knew I'd seen one somewhere! I'll check out the Wizard website.

 

 

Beautifully done, as usual.  Have you decided on the layout name yet?

Thanks Paul! No name for the layout yet, I'm still looking for inspiration. Nick (Buffalo) has suggested setting it somewhere in the Chew valley area. I need to research further, but I'm looking for a town that "might" have had a line terminating in it around the 1860s to 1880s that William Clarke could have been involved in!

 

I hope that you do not mind the question...  how did you get from flat sheet to walls of a building?  Or maybe:- what forms the shell of the building and how did you attach the SEF?

 

regards Graham (apprentice bricklayer for Basilica Fields)

 

Hi Graham, I first cut out the SEF sheet using the brick spacing as my guide to building dimensions and window/door placement. Once this has been established I laminate this top brick surface onto 60 thou plasticard plain sheet using Daywat liquid poly solvent. Once this has dried over night I laminate a further 20 thou sheet to the "unbricked" side and allow to dry. I ony do this initially to the building ends, the sides remain just the cut out SEF brick sheet. The sides are then glued to the ends, ensuring that the brick courses line up properly at the corners. Once this has hardened, I then laminate the sides using the 60 and 20 thou sheet as before, but his time cutting it to fit exactly between the two ends. This method gives a good, strong staggered joint and allows the brickwork to continue around the building.

 

Good luck with the Basilica Fields brickwork, I reckon you're going to be busy!

 

 

Not only a super result but an excellent description of how you built it - a very useful and informative post. Thank you.

 

Mike

Thanks Mike, glad you found it useful!

 

 

It looks better than my actual house

Lol, I'm sure thats not true!

 

Smiths (available from Scale Link/Shire Scenes) do etched weigh bridges in other scales, I don't know for sure about 7mm. I have their N/2mm ones stashed for later use.

Thanks Rich, I'll check out Scalelink as well!

 

Thanks for all the positive comments guys!

 

Best wishes

 

Dave

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Hi Dave, what a lovely building, and  a very useful step by step demo (I've got one of these planned for Farthing, so thanks for that). Agree about the SEF sheets, the 4mm ones work well too, I think.

Thanks Mikkel, I'm looking forward to seeing some more from Farthing

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Dave,

What a lovely little building, really characterful.  I really like the "moss" on the glazing bars - really breathes life into the model.  In fact it was the first thing I noticed on the opening image when I opened up the blog entry.

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Hi Ian, glad you liked the "moss" on the glazing bars. It's something I've noticed on a number of prototypical buildings and had planned on representing on a model one day. Some people might say that that the fact that a window pane had been rendered opaque in one corner by the addition of too much liquid poly, might have influenced my decision to add some moss on this model!!

 

Best wishes

 

Dave

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