Jump to content

Four o'clock blues, ca. 1902

Mikkel

2,084 views

002b.jpg

 

Goods checker J. Peerybingle was tired. It had been a long day in the goods depot, and his feet hurt.

 


003b.jpg

 

Life is so dull, he thought. I should have gone to sea. I should have married Emily.

 


004.jpg

 

He looked up at the skylights. There was a bird up there. Was it a crow?

 


005b.jpg

 

He thought: How lucky birds are, how free.

 


006e.jpg

 

Up on the roof, the crow looked down at Peerybingle.

 


007b.jpg

 

It thought: How fortunate that man is, working with the trains. He must be very happy.

 


IMG_0330xx.jpg

 

I wish it was me, thought the crow. How lucky humans are, how free.

  • Like 32


30 Comments


Recommended Comments



Tell that crow to keep smoking the "good stuff" - "How lucky humans are, how free" - made me smile.

Share this comment


Link to comment

Wonderfully pensive Mikkel. Truely.

 

Of course, when entrancing the mind with a such a wonderful story, it's easy for us to overlook the actual detail within the pictures.

 

I somehow think your scenarios are almost akin to stage sets: Each and every picture is impeccably composed, including a subliminal use of light and shadow.

 

Wonderful modelling - bearing a true sense of individual expression toward the hobby too.

Share this comment


Link to comment

Tell that crow to keep smoking the "good stuff" - "How lucky humans are, how free" - made me smile.

 

 

Yeah, a wee bit of irony in there maybe :-)

Share this comment


Link to comment

Wonderfully pensive Mikkel. Truely.

 

Of course, when entrancing the mind with a such a wonderful story, it's easy for us to overlook the actual detail within the pictures.

 

I somehow think your scenarios are almost akin to stage sets: Each and every picture is impeccably composed, including a subliminal use of light and shadow.

 

Wonderful modelling - bearing a true sense of individual expression toward the hobby too.

 

Thanks Mark. I realize that some will find this sort of thing contrived, but for me it's developed into a relaxing extra aspect of the hobby. The equipment is pretty basic though, a point and shoot and my two old workbench lamps. A lot of the shadows come naturally from the roof structure, although I had fun experimenting with a torch for the spotlight on the checker's face :-)

Share this comment


Link to comment

It's a very nicely composed scene. I like how the arches in the background tie it all in to The Bay, and that shot up into the blue sky...wow! But remember - where there are birds there's muck ;)

 

Your ears were probably burning over the weekend as gwrrob and I chatted quite a bit about Farthing.

Share this comment


Link to comment

 

Your ears were probably burning over the weekend as gwrrob and I chatted quite a bit about Farthing.

 

Yes we were and this work shews exactly what we meant.Outstanding work.

Share this comment


Link to comment

Mikkel,

 

Absolutely brilliant!!  Beautiful modelling and a wonderful tale to boot!  Once again I can see what people are raven about, it's really quite a carrion on.  I'm choughed to bits  :-)

 

Ok I'll get my coat and leave now :-)

 

Ian

Share this comment


Link to comment

Just what I needed, a post from Farthing to round off the day :-) Lovely modelling, great pictures all woven together with a wistful narrative. Period modelling at its best!

 

Thanks Mikkel

Share this comment


Link to comment

The other mans grass is always greener. I could believe a crow thinking like that. The haphazard arrangement of the boxes and barrels seem just right. I bet everything had to be written down in big ledgers. Wonderful modelling.

Don

Share this comment


Link to comment

Cannot really add any more Mikkel - what a great set of images - almost tells the story without words..

 

Regs

 

Ian

Share this comment


Link to comment

Thanks for this excellent entry. I enjoyed the pictures and the little story.

I believe you have found your protagonist.

 

May I suggest to give the crow (raven) a name:

"Grip, Grip, Grip, Grip the clever, Grip the wicked, Grip the knowing, Grip, Grip, Grip, cried the raven." from Barnaby Rudge by Charles Dickens.

Share this comment


Link to comment

Brilliant, Mikkel

 

John

Thanks John, I was poring over your website last night. So much inspiration there. Your

Share this comment


Link to comment

An interesting collection of birds, including, I see a Red Kite at bottom right.  This is now a very common bird in Oxfordshire but, at the beginning of the 20th century, was almost extinct, due to persecution.

 

Mike

Share this comment


Link to comment

Yes the sculptor does seem to have made an effort to create some specific species, which is nice. Interesting what you say about the Red Kite - there are so many potential pitfalls in modelling, now also the distribution of station cats and the changing population status of kites!

 

I wonder if the crow is actually a raven. Look a bit big for a crow when compared to the other birds. Well let's just say I was referring to the overall family, not the carrion crow ;-)

Share this comment


Link to comment

Mikkel,

 

fabulous post!

 

You reminded me of an small episode in my life: When I used to live by Brockwell Park in S London, there was a crow we called "Brring", as it had a specific call (different to all the others) that sounded like an old telephone...think opening dialogue track to "Get Carter". Several years later and I was standing on Vauxhall Station (3 miles away), and heard the familiar "BRRRING" call, there on the top of the lamppost was what I can only assume was our old friend. I was waiting for a steam excursion at the time! Brought a smile to my face.

 

Now do you want me to start giving you feedback on your patent glazing weathering details?!

 

Huge enjoyment from your posting!

 

All best,

 

Matt

Share this comment


Link to comment

Yes the sculptor does seem to have made an effort to create some specific species, which is nice. Interesting what you say about the Red Kite - there are so many potential pitfalls in modelling, now also the distribution of station cats and the changing population status of kites!

 

I wonder if the crow is actually a raven. Look a bit big for a crow when compared to the other birds. Well let's just say I was referring to the overall family, not the carrion crow ;-)

 

I think you can use all three crow/ravens. The viewer will only see the difference between them if you show them next to another. You can use them separately in the different scenes you have built. 

Grip needs a care taker I believe. It's up to you to find or use one. But remember: Grip was by no means an idle or unprofitable member of the humble household.

Share this comment


Link to comment

This is a beautiful sequence, so well modelled and photographed and with the trademark "Mikkel" magic! I enjoyed this very much.

cheers,

Iain

Share this comment


Link to comment

More please.

 

Also lovely building too. and lighting.... and story.... and pictures ...... : D

Cheers Mac :-) This goods depot has been underway for ages but it's fun to be finally doing the detailing. Got a couple of parcels with 4mm freight items today, should fill up a corner or two.

 

 

Mikkel,

 

fabulous post!

 

You reminded me of an small episode in my life: When I used to live by Brockwell Park in S London, there was a crow we called "Brring", as it had a specific call (different to all the others) that sounded like an old telephone...think opening dialogue track to "Get Carter". Several years later and I was standing on Vauxhall Station (3 miles away), and heard the familiar "BRRRING" call, there on the top of the lamppost was what I can only assume was our old friend. I was waiting for a steam excursion at the time! Brought a smile to my face.

 

Now do you want me to start giving you feedback on your patent glazing weathering details?!

 

Huge enjoyment from your posting!

 

All best,

 

Matt

Thanks Matt, what a great story. Sounds like that crow was a bit of a railway enthusiast :-) And yes please, any tips on weathering the glazing would actually be appreciated! Either that or I'll just wait for the dust to settle on the glazing!

 

BTW I couldn't find the opening dialogue to Get Carter on Youtube, but this isn't bad either. The height of cool, I would say!

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aoa3OTJfWIY

 

 

I think you can use all three crow/ravens. The viewer will only see the difference between them if you show them next to another. You can use them separately in the different scenes you have built. 

Grip needs a care taker I believe. It's up to you to find or use one. But remember: Grip was by no means an idle or unprofitable member of the humble household.

Hi Job, yes I was thinking along those lines too. The flying one looks like it would be good for a bird's eye view! Not unprofitable.. were you thinking of something along these lines maybe:

 

The_Adventures_of_Tintin_-_21_-_The_Cast

 

 

This is a beautiful sequence, so well modelled and photographed and with the trademark "Mikkel" magic! I enjoyed this very much.

cheers,

Iain

 

Thanks Iain, and nice to see you here! (I'm having trouble uploading the photos to Blogger). I'm afraid I can't match your giant seagulls though! :-) And no moving signalman either! 

Share this comment


Link to comment

I agree with the flying crow for some nice birdview pictures of the Farthing scenes.

But maybe the crow has some more talents that are usable. For instance

 

Share this comment


Link to comment

Hi Mikkel,

 

See 0:35 here

 

:-)

 

Ah yes, a proper phone. An unusual crow it must have been! Thanks, now I feel like watching all of Get Carter, have only seen it once years ago.

Share this comment


Link to comment

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue.