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Trackwork - Narrow Gauge

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The narrow gauge track (which is barely 36 inches of plain line!) is finally all in place. The original idea was for a feeder from a mine at the back of the layout to the processing plant, as shown by the red line here:

blogentry-14389-0-53225100-1437069945_thumb.jpg

 

I also thought of running the NG line around the back of the processing plant on a low embankment. Unfortunately, the success of my hand-built points inspired me to tackle a flat crossing over one of the SG sidings. At much the same time I realised it would be better to have the mine off-scene (above the fiddle yard), and not behind the layout, where I could only use it at an exhibition because the layout sits against a wall here at home. And so, the longer SG siding was shortened, the shorter siding was lengthened and I have finally ended up with this:

blogentry-14389-0-14836900-1437070947.jpg

 

It has all taken rather a long time because I have been somewhat bitten by the flexibility of an open-top baseboard and decided to build the NG line on a gradient to make it more interesting. This means, the SG sidings and the flat crossing are on the level, but the NG line rises behind the processing plant, and drops away across the exit to the fiddle yard:

blogentry-14389-0-46371800-1437071135.jpg

 

The white track base is 3 mm foam board to match the 3 mm cork under the SG sidings and allow me to go upwards and downwards. The gradient downwards here is about 1:21. And, as if I needed more, the NG line becomes a tramway so it can share a bridge with an access road to the processing plant. To do this I have put a step in the track base and glued the rails directly onto the track base over the bridge.

 

I think the tramway ought to be along the crown of the road but this would have meant a very tight curve on the NG line, so I have stayed with a 9 inch radius and I now see the bridge on a skew as shown by the steel rule (as a pavement) and the pencil (as a bridge abutment):

blogentry-14389-0-89963600-1437071622.jpg

 

So, I have now set myself to build a skew bridge with a gradient on the road surface and a hidden track running across the middle. And I need to add a high-level NG deck onto the fiddle yard.

 

This is either genius or insanity, but I do like having all the angles. Please do add comments if you like, I am happy to add extra details (or corrections!) to these blog posts.

 

- Richard.

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Looking again at this blog after sometime away (I quite easily lose track of what I've been viewing) I'm inclined to think that your modelling skills, both in creative construction and artwork, lean more to the genius than the insanity.

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Looking again at this blog after sometime away (I quite easily lose track of what I've been viewing) I'm inclined to think that your modelling skills, both in creative construction and artwork, lean more to the genius than the insanity.

I think the difference is very small indeed, and susceptible to fluctuations.

 

This bridge would be built by now, if I had not decided to finish the structure using real stone slips, and then decided to finish chunks of the layout to H0 scale, and then moved on to rebuilding H0 wagons.

 

It is a useful model to build, because it will let me built the station platform in front of it and then add the rock faces behind the platform, and doing this will define the boundaries between these two parts of the whole layout.

 

- Richard.

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Removal of the NG track

During the summer of 2018, I adopted DCC for the standard gauge railway. I don't use DCC for my NG engines, so this left the narrow gauge section impossible to use except on analogue DC days. I accepted I could never extend the NG line into anything more than a semi-static diorama, and I lifted the tracks and rebuilt this area of the baseboard.

 

During the early days of the project, people did try to tell me the NG line was probably a bit too much railway in the space available but my enthusiasm was too great. Taking the NG away makes space to make the standard gauge line better. I will work up the bridge here into something with a level deck, though I do hope it will still be a skew bridge.

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