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wenlock

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I like to have a number of different projects on the go to ensure that once I've had enough of a particular aspect of modelling then there's always something else to get on with! I've found there's a limit to how much enjoyment can be had glueing static grass fibres to my layout, so decided a bit of soldering was in order! :-) Sherton Abbas station platform will be lit by representations of gas lamps, so a regular supply of gas would be needed to supply these. In the period that I'm modelling the GWR transported gas in twin cylinder wagons, so I thought an example of one of these would be a nice addition to the stock used on my layout. WEP models produce a rather nice etched brass kit of a Cordon wagon, so I treated myself to an example and made a start on its construction.

 

WEP models twin cylinder cordon

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The kit contains the usual etched brass frets, assorted thickness brass wire and some white metal castings. Wheels and axles aren't supplied with the kit, so a pair of Slaters wheels and axles were also purchased.

 

Kit components

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The instructions supplied with the kit start with the fabrication of the cylinders, so the components were cut from the fret and the edges smoothed with a fine cut file.

 

Cylinder components

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The pieces of brass obviously need to be curved to form the cylinders, so I rolled the pieces of brass on a sheet of rubber matting to produce a smooth curve along their length.

 

Rolled cylinder components

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These curved components then needed to be soldered together to form the cylinders. Despite reading the instructions in what I thought was a careful manner I couldn't work out how these components could go together to make the required diameter cylinders. After much head scratching the penny finally dropped and I realised that I had rolled the brass in completely the wrong direction! The components were designed to be rolled along their width and not as I had done along their length! After much muttering and a few expletives I managed to flatten the pieces of brass and then roll them again, but this time in the right direction! "When in doubt follow the instructions" seems to be an appropriate comment at this juncture!

 

Cylinder components rolled correctly

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Once I'd re-rolled the cylinders things progressed much more smoothly and the pieces were soldered together using the riveted joining strips.

 

Cylinder components soldered with jointing strips

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The end caps for the cylinders are white metal castings and these need the addition of a couple of etched brass components before the assembly of the cylinders can be completed

 

End caps

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The three cylinder pieces were soldered together using "Carrs" 188 solder paste and then the end caps were glued in position using Araldite epoxy resin. I must admit I found assembling the cylinders quite challenging and think that etched brass overlays attached to a piece of brass tubing of the right diameter would be a lot easier to construct!

 

Completed cylinders

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The cylinder support frames were the next components that needed to be assembled and these come as etched brass pieces that need to be folded up to the required shape.

 

Cylinder supports

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The wagon decking is then folded up to make the planking that sits between the cylinder supports.

 

Decking and cylinder supports

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Progress so far!

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Well that's as far as I've managed to get with this kit so far, it's certainly fought back on occasion but I'm hoping the chassis shouldn't be quite as demanding! I can't see much modelling progress being made over the next couple of weeks because of the impending festivities, so I'll take the opportunity to wish everyone a splendid Christmas and look forward to more modelling in 2016! :-)

 

Best wishes

 

Dave

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What I like about brass is that it is so forgiving of mistakes :)  I don't understand why so many people, who are happy with plastic, seem reluctant to use metal, when it is often much easier!

 

I spent ages looking for some brass tube of the correct size, without success, before I finally took the plunge and rolled my own boiler (in 4 mm) - another fearsome task that proved much easier than I expected.

 

I do admire your soldering of all those rivet strip details, though.  I confess that I resort to superglue at that stage, because I like to position things with my fingers.  Solder and bare hands don't mix.

 

It's looking splendid so far and I'm sure the chassis will be much more straightforward.

 

Mike

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Ah! That sinking feeling when you think everything is going swimmingly, and then you realise you've really screwed up. I know it so well! Happily you saved the day.

 

I do like these wagons - they fall into that nice gap between being unusual enough to add a bit of interest from the usual opens and minks, but not so outr

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  • RMweb Gold

Glad you managed to sort out those rolled sections, Dave.

 

Brass can be forgiving but I'm in the habit of folding things the wrong way along half-etched lines, and it's rare that you can bend it back the right way without the joint breaking. I did this with the Castle slide-bars last week, followed by much swearing. But luckily some wooden clothes pegs and patience got everything lined up and soldered back together the right way. I look forward to seeing your finished Cordon.

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Guest Simon Dunkley

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Ah yes, Gas. And a cordon. Would that be a "cordon sanitaire", or is that just me? (Be quiet, Adrian.)

 

Joking aside, was there any rhyme or reason to the telegraphic names for various vehicles?

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Between dressing the edges and rolling, you missed out the bit where you punched out a 1000 rivets, presume on half etch, but still very neatly done, especially after rolling both ways! Model shaping nicely. I think the gas tanks like the cordon carried pressurised oil(?) gas for supply of the tanks on the gas-lit carriages, the station platform gas lamps would be suppllied by the local town coal gas supply?

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Yes, I concur with Northroader. Town gas was uncompressed - the Metropolitan made use of it initially, carrying it on big bellows-like bags on carriage roofs until the mid-1870s, but it was uneconomical and the bags needed replenishing every three hours or so. The Pintsch system worked at 140psi and a typical incandescent burner consumed 7cu ft p/h (Atkins et al), so cordons were parked wherever carriages could be conveniently recharged, and the tanks replenished every few days by a trip down to the nearest resupply point.

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  • RMweb Gold
What I like about brass is that it is so forgiving of mistakes :)  I don't understand why so many people, who are happy with plastic, seem reluctant to use metal, when it is often much easier! I spent ages looking for some brass tube of the correct size, without success, before I finally took the plunge and rolled my own boiler (in 4 mm) - another fearsome task that proved much easier than I expected. I do admire your soldering of all those rivet strip details, though.  I confess that I resort to superglue at that stage, because I like to position things with my fingers.  Solder and bare hands don't mix. It's looking splendid so far and I'm sure the chassis will be much more straightforward. Mike
Thanks Mike! Yep it's certainly lucky that brass is a forgiving material!:-) I'm always a bit wary of using super glue during construction in case something needs soldering later on. I'm sure I read somewhere that it gives off cyanide gas when it's heated!

 

Ah! That sinking feeling when you think everything is going swimmingly, and then you realise you've really screwed up. I know it so well! Happily you saved the day. I do like these wagons - they fall into that nice gap between being unusual enough to add a bit of interest from the usual opens and minks, but not so outr
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Hi again Adrian, I looks like I need to read up about early 20th century gas delivery! I'm going to have to think of a suitable excuse to run the cordon on my branch!:-)

 

 

I think you've already got the perfect excuse in your gas-lit branch set. Park it up by the stop blocks by the bridge for easy access to your carriages, and send it down the line every few days for topping up.

 

There are a number of photos of DD5 No.7 at Lambourn, even in the late 50s to top up gas-lit horseboxes. See the Atkins bible and here: http://www.time-capsules.co.uk/picture/show/1302/Lambourn-Railway-Station

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  • RMweb Gold
I think you've already got the perfect excuse in your gas-lit branch set. Park it up by the stop blocks by the bridge for easy access to your carriages, and send it down the line every few days for topping up.

 

There are a number of photos of DD5 No.7 at Lambourn, even in the late 50s to top up gas-lit horseboxes. See the Atkins bible and here: http://www.time-capsules.co.uk/picture/show/1302/Lambourn-Railway-Station

 

Thanks Adrian, that's good news! Impressed that you're still thinking about modelling at 3.00am, that really is dedication to the cause!:-)

 

 

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  • RMweb Gold

Hi Dave, that's a nice "save", I'm impressed that the initial roll in the other direction can't be seen at all. 

 

I always learn something from your posts and the subsequent comments. Cordons for horseboxes, eh? That means I can have one too! :-)

 

Have a good xmas!

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  • RMweb Gold

Thanks Mikkel, happy Christmas to you too! Glad you find the posts useful, even though in this case it shows what not to do! :-)

 

Looking forward to seeing a Cordon for Farthing in 2016 :-)

 

Best wishes

 

Dave

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