Jump to content
  • entries
    93
  • comments
    685
  • views
    124,345

Making a Mockery

D869

982 views

Planning for Hayle North Quay has progressed a bit. I have now sorted out a 2d plan by combining a transparent bitmap export of the plan from Templot with some colouring in done using Inkscape. The overall depth of the layout will be 22 inches at the ends and 24 inches in the middle.

 

The Octel office block and the whole of the Esso depot have been subjected to quite a lot of fore and aft compression but hopefully I've still managed to keep the character of the place.

 

blogentry-9623-0-63355200-1488226569_thumb.jpg

 

I've also also pulled this together with the various 3d mockups of buildings that I've heen mucking about with for ages and added some expanded polystyrene hills to make a 1/4 size 3d mockup. The snow white hills have now been sprayed with various mixes of acrylic through my third best (5 quid) airbrush to make them a bit less stark. A hairdryer was deployed to persuade the paint to dry.

 

I'll probably still do a few more bits and bobs to the mockup - like adding in some boundary walls and maybe adding a bit of colour to the buildings... and also make those chopped up orange biro oil tanks show up rather better against the rock face behind. Overall I'm reasonably happy with it although there are a few things that I want to adjust when I do the full size version. At the moment the only track gradient is up to the Octel works. I might add more on the real thing but also need to think about wagons rolling away. I still need to add some coal piles on the quay itself. At the moment the middle foreground looks pretty empty. I might also experiment to see how things look if I extend the dunes up as a painted backscene.

 

I had some bits of LED strip left over from our new kitchen that was done last year so some of this was repurposed and fed from South Yard's lighting controller. It's a bit bright for such a small mockup but it does the job.

 

Next job is to start thinking about baseboards... at the moment I'm thinking in terms of 6mm birch ply.

 

Some photos - one overall and one of each of the main clusters of buildings.

 

blogentry-9623-0-46149600-1488226839_thumb.jpg
blogentry-9623-0-31974200-1488226851_thumb.jpg
blogentry-9623-0-04403300-1488226861_thumb.jpg

  • Like 11


4 Comments


Recommended Comments

Looks good. 6mm ply will be fine  I find ordinary external grade ply from a builders merchant is fine. After all you are going to cover it up. 

Don

Share this comment


Link to comment

Cheers Don.

 

I agree that the cosmetic appearance is neither here nor there. It's the stability that I'm most concerned about.

 

I'm by no means an expert on ply, nor do I know a good ply seller from a bad one but it seems to me that if I go to a timber merchant who sells a number of different kinds of ply and is up front about the different grades and the composition of the various options then I stand a better chance of getting something that will stand the test of time.

 

I've already spoken to a local timber merchant (Avon Timber in Coventry). They told me that I probably didn't need birch ply but they also said that it would be less likely to splinter when cut than hardwood faced ply. It's about 37 quid for an 8 by 4 sheet of Grade BB/BB 6.5mm ply which doesn't seem hugely expensive to me. I haven't worked out how much I need yet though.

 

Regards, Andy

Share this comment


Link to comment

To avoid splinters I use a fine toothed saw (at least 10tpi 12tpi would be better) and have a piece of sandpaper handy to rub down the cut edge to just take the splinters off.

This is the underside of a board made for a 2mm layout it has been propped up in various places and survived two house moves but is still flat and square. I am hoping to get on with it once the house is sorted out

post-8525-0-84496900-1299053922_thumb.jpg
post-8525-0-05374500-1299053799_thumb.jpg

 Railway Modeller might publish a short bit from me on baseboards in the May issue

Don

Share this comment


Link to comment

Thanks Don.

 

Is that a traditional toobeewan softwood frame that I see before me?

 

Regards, Andy

Share this comment


Link to comment

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue.