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NWR No.308 'William Montagu' - Info Sheet

Corbs

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FACT SHEET

 

NWR No.
308

 

NWR Name:
William Montagu

 

Wheel Arrangement
0-6-0PT

 

Builder
Great Western Railway (North British Loco Co.)

 

Class
5700

 

Purchased by NWR
1937 (on hire from 1931)

 

'Prototype' Info

 

The legendary GWR 5700 class needs no introduction, but how one of these useful locomotives ended up in the North West requires explanation.
In 1929, the GWR was building hundreds of pannier tanks, more than it needed at the time (due to changes in traffic demands) and Nos. 6700-6749 were put into storage. In 1931, the NWR entered into a locomotive hire contract with the GWR (as the Sudrians needed locomotives quickly) to provide several locomotives of different classes. One that was offered was 6723, but the lack of vacuum brakes was a problem, so 5741 was placed on hire instead, with 6723 coming out of storage and going to work on the GWR.
The hired locos at first sported GWR green but were gradually repainted into NWR lined blue.
As of 1937, the GWR offered to sell the locos then on hire, and the NWR accepted, 308 officially entering NWR stock in May of that year. 308 gained the name 'William Montagu' in the tradition of naming locomotives after important figures in Sudrian history.
William Montagu was King of Sodor and Mann 1333-1344.

 

The Model

 

'William Montagu' also known as 'Duck' is a fairly standard Bachmann 5700, a repainted spare body currently sitting on the NCB version chassis (hence the red rods). The lining and lettering is from Fox Transfers and the plates are from Narrow Planet.
It runs like a dream, although I need to get around to lining out the other side, fitting a crew and coaling it properly!

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Great stuff, both the modelling and the, er, historical detail. I like the mixing of fact and fiction, when done convincingly like here it creates a separate reality!

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Thanks all! I did feel like a heretic with this one, the 14xx will get a similar treatment....

 

Mikkel - thanks for the kind words, I have tried to give the willing suspension of disbelief a helping hand!

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A true beauty, glad to say I got to see all the progress myself via instagram. Can't wait to see whatever else you make or paint, probably both.

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A true beauty, glad to say I got to see all the progress myself via instagram. Can't wait to see whatever else you make or paint, probably both.

Thanks for the kind words!

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Does it waddle? :D

 

 

As an alternate take on NWR blue livery it truly does look the mutts nuts....Awoof woof!

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haha, thanks dude! Ironically one of the smoothest runners I have!

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haha, thanks dude! Ironically one of the smoothest runners I have!

Ah good to know. Ropey runners are a bane.

 

Also above you said you feel a heretic.

 

You indeed are one, yep! Re-writing IOS:IPH&R Naughty boy! :D

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I thought Duck was an 8750 class, at least initially?

 

The reason the GWR went in for saddle and later pannier tanks was to allow for free access to the motion. The position of your name plate would obstruct this. Could it not go on the side of the tank, with either no NWR, or just N and W either side?

 

Regardless of that, it does look superb in that livery!

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I thought Duck was an 8750 class, at least initially?

 

The reason the GWR went in for saddle and later pannier tanks was to allow for free access to the motion. The position of your name plate would obstruct this. Could it not go on the side of the tank, with either no NWR, or just N and W either side?

 

Regardless of that, it does look superb in that livery!

 

Thanks mate! Well really he's whatever I tell him to be (!) but Dalby Is Not To Be Trusted and after he stopped illustrating the books, Duck became 5741 which is the earlier type.

What the name plate is actually mounted on in real life are two brackets mounted to the underside of the tank, with two metal 'loops' on the back of the plate. If a portly crew member cannot squeeze under the nameplate, he need only to lift it off the brackets, the metal being quite light and thin, as evidenced by the bend in the plate....

 

....of course ;)

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