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Carlisle Citadel North Screen

PaternosterRow

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The latest effort is a plan to recreate a part of the great Carlisle Citadel Station for my collection of steam locos. I want a half station scene with a mirror doubling up the length on the internal section. It'll be another one of my wire roof schemes. The tracks beyond a middle platform with act as a run through so that the station can be linked up to a future run around planned for my loft space. Station buildings on the middle platform will hide the hole in the mirror. However, I figured that if I couldn't make a half decent attempt of the magnificent neo Tudor Screen then it would all come to nought.

 

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I used a blown up photocopy of a picture from Denis Perriam and David Ramshaw's book as a template. This was pasted to card and the windows cut out.

 

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The smaller windows were drawn out and then cut.

 

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The middle section of the North Screen as per pictures in the book.

 

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The window bars were painted directly on to a piece of 2mm perspex.

 

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The finished article. Detailing was achieved using strips of Evergreen and whatever else came to hand. Althougth the original was painted white (or Cream) it was very dirty from smoke etc. My weathering is not yet finished as it needs a little more soot above the track positions. The weathering helps hide a lot of mistakes.

 

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An old Lima Crab under the screen. The height is right as far as I can make out from pictures.

 

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The book from which the model was copied.

 

I don't think it's a bad effort, but there's a few wobbly bits and areas where things don't line up quite right. The screen will never be viewed straight on when the layout is complete. However, there's a long way to go yet and, knowing how quickly I can get bored with a current project, the layout may never be completed.

 

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An additional pic taken this morning after a few tweeks to the screen. I got really niggled by the line between the clock section and left hand section - you can see a distinct misalignment between the top arches. So I added a small 1.5mm wide strip of Evergreen along the bottom of the windows. This now lines up nicely. The eye forgives a lack of detail, but it always spots things that are out of true. The screen will also always been seen from this angle on the layout.

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Absolutely superb Mike - another cracker from you on its way :good:

 

Love the way you go about these projects and really look forward to see it when track and platforms are in place.

 

Very inspiring...

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Some incredible modelling. Looking forward to your next entry.[/size]

Hi Job,

 

Thanks very much for the kind words. A long way to go yet with this.

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Great work, really effective - the details give exactly the right amount of relief and shadow.

 

Alex.

 

Much appreciated comment from another Modeller who has ‘the eye’. Your work is always inspiring. Nice to hear from you, Alex.

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Absolutely superb Mike - another cracker from you on its way :good:

Love the way you go about these projects and really look forward to see it when track and platforms are in place.

Very inspiring...

 

Hi Pete,

 

Thanks very much. I tell you, I wished I had your skill with the pen when the plan went down for this. I also wish I could work with the precision you bring to bear in your own creations. Perhaps then I could have avoided some of the awkward mistakes made. I’m one of those types that tends to flag easily, especially during all of the cutting out phase, and it shows. The original screen was so precise and rigidly uniform across its entire length. It was a great work of industrial art that’s now sadly lost having been demolished in 1958. I only hope I do it some justice in model form.

 

Thanks again for the flattering comment.

 

Mike

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