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Coal wagons for Sherton Abbas part 2

wenlock

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A previous blog entry described the building of these wagons http://www.rmweb.co.uk/community/index.php?/blog/1131/entry-21530-coal-wagons-for-sherton-abbas/

 

Once I’d finished building the four wagons they need painting. I’ve tried using acrylic paints in the past but still much prefer working using enamels. The insides were painted in a greyish yellow base coat to represent unpainted wood, this was then dry brushed in browns and gunmetal to represent wood grain. The under frames, internal strapping and solebar iron work were painted in matt black. A fine brush was used to tidy up the lettering which I’d damaged here and there during construction. Next time I’ll varnish the sides to seal them before building starts!

 

Painted wagons
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In order to tone down the wagon’s paintwork I applied a dilute wash of dark grey over all the internal and external surfaces. Once dry this muted the colours nicely without masking them too much. I then dry brushed lighter greys and rust tones over the iron work to highlight the textures and bring out the detail in the under frame and internal strapping.

 

Wagons after application of dilute grey wash
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Once everything had dried a wash of dilute black was applied inside the wagon to simulate coal dust and enhance the separation of the internal planking. A similar but more subtle wash was then applied to the external surfaces again to enhance the surface detail and planking.

 

Wagons after dilute black wash
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A light application of coal dust and crushed coal was then brushed into the internal corners and planking of the wagons and fixed in place with a mist of aerosol clear matt varnish.

 

Application of coal dust
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I use Spratt & Winkle couplings on my stock, which although not particularly aesthetic, do work reliably and allow hands free shunting. Before assembly I chemically blackened the brass components using Birchwood Casey "Brass Black", which stops the shiny brass couplings looking too obtrusive!

 

Couplings
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Now the wagons are finished here are a few pictures of them in service on the layout:-)

 

Lady Jayne emerging from the Abbey woods on the private siding after a delivery of coal to the brick works.
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Proceeding down the line into Sherton Abbas station.
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Waiting at the siding signal
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With the signal set to clear "Lady Jayne" can proceed across the double slip prior to pushing the wagons into the exchange siding.
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Placing the empty wagons into the exchange siding where they will be collected by the next pick up goods.
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I'm pleased with the way the wagons have turned out and feel that the extra effort involved in adding the internal planking and bolt heads has been worthwhile. It does however mean that I'm going to have to "revisit" some of my other wagons who are sadly lacking! :-)

 

Until next time......

 

Best wishes

 

Dave

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Nice work, Dave.

 

Like you, I have added a few crumbs of coal to the inside of my PO wagons, but following this post yesterday (http://www.rmweb.co.uk/community/index.php?/topic/113035-more-pre-grouping-wagons-in-4mm-the-d299-appreciation-thread/?p=3371960) I wonder if I shouldn’t have?

 

I do like to apply a very thin wash of gunmetal (non metallic) to the insides of wagons as the last stage, to bring out the grain. I am now wondering if that shouldn’t be the metallic version, followed by a very light burnishing with a clean brush to bring out a few sparkles, representing dust that got embedded in the planks?

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Nice work, Dave. Like you, I have added a few crumbs of coal to the inside of my PO wagons, but following this post yesterday (http://www.rmweb.co.uk/community/index.php?/topic/113035-more-pre-grouping-wagons-in-4mm-the-d299-appreciation-thread/?p=3371960) I wonder if I shouldn’t have? I do like to apply a very thin wash of gunmetal (non metallic) to the insides of wagons as the last stage, to bring out the grain. I am now wondering if that shouldn’t be the metallic version, followed by a very light burnishing with a clean brush to bring out a few sparkles, representing dust that got embedded in the planks?

Thanks Regularity!  That's an interesting post regarding sweeping the wagons out after a coal delivery. I guess we'll just have to assume that the foreman at Sherton Abbas brick works is a bit of a slacker and thinks the company has money to burn!:-)

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As always, nice modelling Dave.

 

I have tried the method described by Regularity and if used sparingly it can look quite effective, so maybe give it a go or else get the foreman a new broom with stiffer bristles !

 

Look forward to the next instalment as ever.

 

Grahame

 

p.s. the DG has had its first coat of paint.

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Dave you have created some nicely weathered PO coal wagons.

I also like the pictorial story telling of the shunting movements.

For me it is like looking at your working layout. Unfortunately I'm not able to visit model railway shows anymore. 

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As always, nice modelling Dave.
Thanks Graham!

 

 I have tried the method described by Regularity and if used sparingly it can look quite effective, so maybe give it a go or else get the foreman a new broom with stiffer bristles !
The use of “gunmetal” does give a nice sheen to the surface, I might give it a try on one of the wagons to add variety:-)

 

 Look forward to the next instalment as ever. 
I’d better get busy then!:-)

 

 p.s. the DG has had its first coat of paint.
Really looking forward to seeing it!

 

Dave you have created some nicely weathered PO coal wagons.I also like the pictorial story telling of the shunting movements.For me it is like looking at your working layout. Unfortunately I'm not able to visit model railway shows anymore. 
Thanks Job!:-) I’m sorry to hear you aren’t able to visit shows anymore, I suppose at least it’s possible to view some exhibitions on youtube these days.Best wishesDave

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Evening David,

 

Great work as usual, all those photos have so much atmosphere. It has to be one of my favourite layouts, up there with Hursley and Ditchling Green.

 

I notice the retaining wall is still missing a plump wood pigeon, or was it to be a seagull ?

 

All the best,

 

Martyn.

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Great stuff Dave. I agree about the Spratt & Winkles, not pretty but quite reliable. In fact I'm always a bit surprised that they do work with such consistency, you'd think it didn't take much mislaignment to stop them working.

 

As Job says, nice shunting sequence. The shunting signal in that next to last photo comes off really well, discrete but interesting.

 

I hadn't spotted the duck until Dave mentioned it - brilliant!

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Evening David, Great work as usual, all those photos have so much atmosphere. It has to be one of my favourite layouts, up there with Hursley and Ditchling Green.

Thanks Martyn:-)

 

Hursley and Ditchling Green were instrumental in my decision to change from 4mm to 7mm modelling, I'm delighted you think Sherton Abbas bares comparison!

 

 

 I notice the retaining wall is still missing a plump wood pigeon, or was it to be a seagull ? 

Lol! yes I must get on with resolving that, I still cant find those wretched magnets when shunting!:-)

 

 

Came back for another look. 

 

Even the duck is perfect. 

Thanks Dave:-)

 

 

Great stuff Dave. I agree about the Spratt & Winkles, not pretty but quite reliable. In fact I'm always a bit surprised that they do work with such consistency, you'd think it didn't take much mislaignment to stop them working.

 

Thanks Mikkel, yes couplings are a necessary evil I'm afraid!  I've tried most methods over the years and getting the right balance between reliability, robustness and appearance is a challenge.  I keep promising myself that I'm going to modify the couplings by keeping the Spratt & Winkle paddle, pivot and chain, but replacing the unsightly hook with something made from fine wire.  Unfortunately there is always something more interesting to do!:-)

 

 

The shunting signal in that next to last photo comes off really well, discrete but interesting.

Glad you noticed the little shunting signal, it's still one of my favourite features on the layout:-)

 

 

I hadn't spotted the duck until Dave mentioned it - brilliant!

Thanks! , There are also a couple of moor hens just out of shot :-)

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