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Stour valley dream - Into the fiddle-yard and plans for mill siding

Fen End Pit

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The corner of the room has two baseboards, one which will feature a scenic area with the mill and the other, much narrower board, for the fiddle-yard. These two boards don't have the space for the curve which leads into the fiddle-yard because this needs to be removable so that the 'crew lounge' can be used as a bed when we have guests.

 

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The resulting extra board is a bit of an odd shape caused by a desire for the rails to cross at right-angles to the the baseboard edge and for the permanent boards to not have too many 'sticky out bits' to catch yourself on while sleeping! The very narrow parts of the board, where the track is very close to the edge on the left is 'off-scene' and will have a wall to prevent anything falling off into the drink.

 

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Once in position I was pleased that the cork which I marked from the Templot drawing fitted correctly, I am down to a 3'4" radius curve at this point so didn't have much room to make it tighter if I'd needed too. The cork got stuck down and the sleepers are now in place. I need to get some more rail from C&L at Stevenage tomorrow so obviously he won't have any in stock (just guessing).

 

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I had a bit of a play in Templot to see how the mill siding would look if I put in a head-shunt. I can get one in though the point is quite tight ( A4.5 Y). The radius isn't too bad so I think it would be ok. The real advantage is that this would allow wagons in the sidings to be shunted without fouling the mainline and I could use a small industrial locomotive. This could hide in the headshunt while the mainline locomotive exchanged wagons.

 

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The mill buildings I constructed based on Ebridge in Norfolk look quite nice, I will probably extend the hideous asbestos part just to avoid them being too twee.

 

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The Barclay fireless rather looks the part with a pair of grain tanks.

 

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I think I might put in a wagon turntable on the siding away from the building which then crosses the line next to the building to disappear between the two bits of mill to a boiler house behind. That way the buildings don't need the clearance for a rotating wagon and the siding between the two buildings can be tight.

 

So, I'm pleased with the progress, hopefully I should get the track into the fiddle-yard laid next week. Then I need to work on the lifting section over the door before I can got round and round.

 


David

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Oooh, a fireless! Shame we don't see more of them.

 

This project is coming along just fine, David, with a lot of excellent work so far.

 

David

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Hi.  Wonder if the sidings and mill should all be swung round a bit, so that the line of the buildings isn't parallel to the baseboard edge, as it appears to be in the fourth picture? 

 

Also wonder if the size of the complex would justify a need for its own loco?  Would the reality not be that it would be shunted daily/as needs be by the trip working setting off/picking up wagons at it?  And if something needed moved inbetween times it could be just a pinchbar, or later a motorised wagon mover (little bit like a wheelbarrow)?  

 

An example I thought of of an industrial siding without a headshunt was a military depot at Throsk, because of the pictures of it posted by Ernie Brack, see:https://flic.kr/p/2b14y5M as an example.  However that is off a double track, and it might be that there was interchange sidings within the depot.  I suspect the available mapping of the time doesn't show the full extent of that facility, see: https://maps.nls.uk/geo/explore/#zoom=14&lat=56.1094&lon=-3.8463&layers=193&b=1  No doubt there were examples on the real railway of facilities with and without their own headshunts!  

 

Anyway, just some thoughts, I have no particular knowledge of how something like this would have worked!  

 

Thanks for your blog posts, always interesting reading, particularly your extensive use of a laser cutter etc.

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Hi.  Wonder if the sidings and mill should all be swung round a bit, so that the line of the buildings isn't parallel to the baseboard edge, as it appears to be in the fourth picture? 

 

Also wonder if the size of the complex would justify a need for its own loco?  Would the reality not be that it would be shunted daily/as needs be by the trip working setting off/picking up wagons at it?  And if something needed moved inbetween times it could be just a pinchbar, or later a motorised wagon mover (little bit like a wheelbarrow)?  

 

An example I thought of of an industrial siding without a headshunt was a military depot at Throsk, because of the pictures of it posted by Ernie Brack, see:https://flic.kr/p/2b14y5M as an example.  However that is off a double track, and it might be that there was interchange sidings within the depot.  I suspect the available mapping of the time doesn't show the full extent of that facility, see: https://maps.nls.uk/geo/explore/#zoom=14&lat=56.1094&lon=-3.8463&layers=193&b=1  No doubt there were examples on the real railway of facilities with and without their own headshunts!  

 

Anyway, just some thoughts, I have no particular knowledge of how something like this would have worked!  

 

Thanks for your blog posts, always interesting reading, particularly your extensive use of a laser cutter etc.

 

I'll have a good look at the relationship between the buildings and the baseboard before I make any decisions. I agree that having a locomotive is probably complete overkill but I think I can be forgiven for wanting an excuse for a small industrial. It is a really probably that we don't yet have a 4mm scale working horse available. The other option would of course be a tractor with pushing bars, seeing one of those radio controlled in 4mm would be fun too.

 

David

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