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Clerestory Brake 3rd diag D14 Part 2

I find it much easier to paint coach sides "in the flat" rather than when the coach is fully assembled.  This is obviously impossible with etched brass kits, soldering painted sides would be a challenge:), however with plastic kits it's not a problem.  The Slater's sides come in two halves which have to be joined, fortunately the Guard's ducket helps hide any join line.  I think it looks more realistic if coaches have a few windows open, so micro strip was used to represent the top of the droplights in the doors.

 

Sides joined and droplight height adjusted

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The sides were then painted with gloss Phoenix Precision GWR coach cream https://www.phoenix-paints.co.uk/, using my airbush.  I used gloss paint, which once dry gives a hard smooth surface to apply the lining to.  Unfortunately the paint has dried with an "orange peel" finish, which hopefully won't be too apparent after a coat of satin varnish has been applied, once the coach is completed! 

 

Cream application

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Once the cream paint had dried for a couple of days, low tack masking tape https://www.amazon.co.uk/FrogTape-Painters-Masking-Multisurface-41-1m/dp/B004QXKFBQ/ref=asc_df_B004QXKFBQ/?tag=googshopuk-21&linkCode=df0&hvadid=223237768057&hvpos=1o1&hvnetw=g&hvrand=6166215919130271044&hvpone=&hvptwo=&hvqmt=&hvdev=c&hvdvcmdl=&hvlocint=&hvlocphy=9045352&hvtargid=pla-357994525169&psc=1&th=1&psc=1  was applied on top of the raised panel beading.

 

Masking tape in position

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Phoenix Precision GWR coach brown was then applied to the sides, once again using my airbrush.  The join between the cream and brown paint occurs on the raised moulding, which will be painted black later, so consequently doesn't need to be perfectly straight :)

 

Brown Application

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The bolections and droplights were then brush painted using Phoenix Precision Indian Red.

 

Indian Red

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The raised panel moulding was then painted black using a fine tipped brush, fortunately the junction between the black and the body colour will be hidden by the lining.

 

Black panel moulding

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The next stage of the process is to apply the lining and for this I use a Bob Moore lining pen. https://www.phoenix-paints.co.uk/products/lining-and-sundries/moore The pen comprises of a handle, paint reservoir and fine needle like tubes of assorted diameters.  I've got the Craftsman Plus set, which includes 3 different heads, one each of 0.008” Fine, 0.012”Standard & 0.020” Standard Plus Heads

I've found that In order to get a successful result using these pens two things must be right.  The paint consistency must be correct, so that it flows properly and the pen must be held at the right angle.  A bit of practice is useful on a scrap of plasticard and is useful to check that the paint is flowing adequately before applying it to the model!

 

Bob Moore lining pen

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I start the lining by going around each of the cream panels with brown paint using the "Standard Plus Head" giving a line about 0.5 mm wide.

 

Brown lining

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Once the brown lining is dry, I go around each panel again but this time using gold paint applied using the "Standard Head" which gives a line about 0.3 mm wide.  This means that each cream panel is edged in a 0.3 mm gold line, which is then edged with a 0.2 mm brown line.

 

The brown panels are simply lined with gold paint using the "Standard Head" giving a 0.3 mm line.

 

Gold Lining applied

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Lettering was applied using CPL products https://www.cplproducts.net/transfers.html ,along with numbering using transfers from HMRS https://hmrs.org.uk/transfers.html

 

Lettering & Numbering

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The sides now need the application of some clear satin varnish to protect the transfers and to tone down the high gloss finish, but I'll probably do this once the coach has been further assembled onto it's under frame and ends which will have to wait until the next bog entry:)

 

All in all a rather long winded process which makes the advent of Slater's pre-printed sides look very attractive, although there is some satisfaction in having a go yourself!

 

Until next time ......

 

Best wishes

 

Dave

 

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I use a black laundry marker for the mouldings,  as when I used a brush and paint the result was rubbish and I stripped it all off and started again.

 

 

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1 hour ago, Siberian Snooper said:

I use a black laundry marker for the mouldings,  as when I used a brush and paint the result was rubbish and I stripped it all off and started again.

 

 

That's a good idea, glad it worked out well for you:)

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I now understand why the GWR lined their stock. It was all a ploy to hide that they couldn't paint their choc and cream straight! :jester:

 

Only joking Dave, those sides are superb. Also very useful to see the Bob Moore lining pen in close-up. It must require quite some skill to apply it as neatly as you have done.  Can I ask what airbrush you use?

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10 minutes ago, Mikkel said:

I now understand why the GWR lined their stock. It was all a ploy to hide that they couldn't paint their choc and cream straight! :jester:

Lol!

 

13 minutes ago, Mikkel said:

Only joking Dave, those sides are superb. Also very useful to see the Bob Moore lining pen in close-up. It must require quite some skill to apply it as neatly as you have done.  Can I ask what airbrush you use?

 

Thanks Mikkel,

 

I find painting coaches one of the the more challenging aspects of modelling the Edwardian Great Western, so I'm really pleased you think they look OK. :)

 

The Bob Moore pen does take a bit of practice to get the hang of, but the addition of a couple of drips of cigarette lighter fluid helps the paint to flow easily without thinning it too much.  The raised moulding on the coach sides really helps to keep the pen in position on the coach sides, I've had much less success lining flat surfaces :rolleyes:

 

I use an Iwata revolution airbrush and smart jet compressor like this onehttps://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/Iwata-Modeller-airbrush-kit-with-Smart-Jet-compressor-Brand-New-Never-Been-Used/163805690672?hash=item2623947b30:g:sZQAAOSw-xhdSIL3

 

It's a really good set up, limited only by my ability! 

 

Best wishes

 

Dave

 

 

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Thanks Dave, the Iwata does seem to be widely recommended. And the compressor is not as bulky as a I thought.

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Beautiful work.  The full lining of a GWR carriage is a real challenge but very fine when done well, as here :)

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53 minutes ago, MikeOxon said:

Beautiful work.  The full lining of a GWR carriage is a real challenge but very fine when done well, as here :)

Thanks Mike!

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Dave,

Wonderful work.  Can’t wait to see the finished coach being pulled into Sheraton, maybe by a River class!

 

BTW, I’ve a load of 4mm coach sides that will need lining if you feel you’re not getting enough practice...

 

Duncan

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NB I’m still waiting to get my hands on a 4mm Ricer class.  Been promised one is possibly en route, but....

D

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I suppose it’s long winded due to having to wait for the next bog entry...?!

 

A fascinating read as usual. I was idly thinking myself about getting one of these pens - yet again Dave you are leading me astray!

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2 hours ago, drduncan said:

Dave,

Wonderful work.  

Thanks Duncan.

 

2 hours ago, drduncan said:

 Can’t wait to see the finished coach being pulled into Sheraton, maybe by a River class!

Nor can I:)  Yes the River class pulling a rake of bogie clerestories and maybe a couple of six wheelers into Sherton Abbas is definitely the plan, just not sure quite how long it will take me!

 

2 hours ago, drduncan said:

BTW, I’ve a load of 4mm coach sides that will need lining if you feel you’re not getting enough practice...

A very kind offer, but I think I'll pass:D  I tried lining 4 mm coaches about 20 years ago , Its one of the reasons I decided to change to 7 mm!

 

2 hours ago, drduncan said:

NB I’m still waiting to get my hands on a 4mm Ricer class.  Been promised one is possibly en route, but....

D

Excellent news!  I hope the River finds it's way to you very soon:)  I'm sure a certain Iain would be very interested in the "Ricer" class:D

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2 hours ago, Tricky said:

I suppose it’s long winded due to having to wait for the next bog entry...?!

Lol! I hadn't noticed that:)  Certainly a lot of hot air!

 

2 hours ago, Tricky said:

A fascinating read as usual. I was idly thinking myself about getting one of these pens - yet again Dave you are leading me astray!

Glad you found it useful:) The pens are very good once you get the hang of them, but are a bit technique sensitive at first use.  its important that the needle applicator is kept more or less at 90 degrees to the work, so the paint flows evenly.  When I first bought mine I tried to use it angled like a pen and got nowhere and was initially a bit disappointed with it:rolleyes:

 

I'm delighted to be continuing to lead you astray If it means we get to read about your next projects!  

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1 hour ago, wenlock said:

Lol! I hadn't noticed that:)  Certainly a lot of hot air!

 

Glad you found it useful:) The pens are very good once you get the hang of them, but are a bit technique sensitive at first use.  its important that the needle applicator is kept more or less at 90 degrees to the work, so the paint flows evenly.  When I first bought mine I tried to use it angled like a pen and got nowhere and was initially a bit disappointed with it:rolleyes:

 

I'm delighted to be continuing to lead you astray If it means we get to read about your next projects!  

I used to use Rotring drawing pens in a previous life before the advent of Autocad so I imagine I will get on with them, as I think they operate in a similar fashion. 

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12 minutes ago, Tricky said:

I used to use Rotring drawing pens in a previous life before the advent of Autocad so I imagine I will get on with them, as I think they operate in a similar fashion. 

Yes with that background you'll have no problems at all, I shall expect great things!:)

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Hi Dave, good to see you at the weekend. With the lighter fluid, do you use a particular brand? I seem to remember being told that only Ronson fluid works, which might be why I didn't have much joy using the Swan fluid I was able to buy locally. 

 

I also wasn't sure whether you're meant to use the fluid in the paint jar, or just in the reservoir of the pen.

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2 hours ago, Job's Modelling said:

Nice work. Looking forward to your next entry.

Thanks Job:)

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35 minutes ago, Barry Ten said:

Hi Dave, good to see you at the weekend. With the lighter fluid, do you use a particular brand? I seem to remember being told that only Ronson fluid works, which might be why I didn't have much joy using the Swan fluid I was able to buy locally. 

Hi Al, yes good to see you too:)  The bottle of lighter fluid i'm using is indeed Ronson, I didn't know other brands weren't suitable, in that case mine was just a lucky purchase from the local newsagents!

 

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44 minutes ago, Barry Ten said:

I also wasn't sure whether you're meant to use the fluid in the paint jar, or just in the reservoir of the pen.

I just put a couple of drips of lighter fluid in the pen reservoir on top of the paint and wiggle a cocktail stick about to mix it.  If the paint is too dilute it tends to bleed across the surface of the model, rather than staying as a crisp line.

 

Looking forward to a good weekend at Telford for Guildex:)

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2 hours ago, Charlie586 said:

You've done fantastic work on the sides, they look great.

Thanks Charlie!:)

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