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Dapol/Airfix 16T Mineral Wagon. We have the technology to rebuild them...

46444

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Apologies to Steve Austin/The Six Million Dollar Man and reference to the cult 1970's TV programme. 

 

Likewise BR started a rebuild programme of its venerable 16T mineral wagons later in their lives. This entailed new build body work and removal of the top flap door amongst other things.

 

For more indepth knowledge it's probably best to consult a suitable reference resource. 

 

From my teenage years long before the likes of Parkside/Bachmann the Airfix 16T Mineral Wagon was the only way to go for the correct 9ft wheelbase chassis. The ready to run boys were using a stretched body fitted to a standard 10ft wheelbase. 

 

An article from the Railway Modeller at the time discussed modelling suitable prototypes from this kit including 13T Sand Wagons and Iron Ore Tippers. Sadly I lost the article many years ago but it remains influential

 

Recently I picked two of these kits up for less than £7 in their Dapol incarnation and they remain one of the nicest builds still. The kits almost falling together. 

 

I decided I wanted to follow in the footsteps of the Six Million Dollar Man and modify the body to represent a rebuild minus top door. 

 

Here's a reference photo from Paul Bartlett's excellent site:

 

https://paulbartlett.zenfolio.com/mineralmortonmxv/h10e54237

 

In true lack of reference photos I went ahead and removed the top doors on the wagons thinking this correct. I then filled the area with suitable thickness plastic sheet. 

 

16T Tanstic...

 

Eventually by checking my references I realised the rib above the side doors should be removed.

 

Drastic action was taken and the middle panel was removed. 

 

16T Tanstic...

 

Then using the door as a guide the wagon sides were re-united from the component parts. 

16T Tanstic...

 

Finally the chassis builds up easily.  Supplied Dapol wheels were coulered with a permanent black Sharpie pen. 

16T Tanstic...

 

Tomorrow I'll replace the body work above the doors with plastic sheet and add the ribbing from Micro-Strip.

 

Need to order buffers from LMS and source suitable 1970's era markings. Hopefully Railtec will come up trumps. 

 

Cheers, 

 

Mark

 

 

 

 

 

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I remember those articles in RM and still have my sand tippler, vacuum brake and 'top flap removed' versions in a box somewhere. I must admit I also left the bar across the top of the side door, probably the article was a bit misleading and we didn't have Paul Bartlett's pictures.... Or the internet! ;)

 

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This looks like a fun project.  I'm doing one in 7mm from an old kit.

 

You might find useful snippets here:

 

Can I be a bit pedantic, looking at the brakes, in the picture shown, that should be the clutch side (compare to the linked photo).  I have got my brakes back to front countless times.  :rtfm:

 

1mm brass strip should be about right for the tie bar.  Attaching it is another story.  I think CA is about the best bet.  The existing W iron keeper will need to be removed.

 

John

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1 minute ago, hmrspaul said:

There were lots of rebuild methods. The full rebuild has the bottom of the sides curved under -Bachmann do this.

 

Your original would have been fine for the type of simple rebuild where the alteration was to remove the top door and weld a steel sheet in place https://PaulBartlett.zenfolio.com/brmineralweld/e3dc0fa4c

 

Paul

Couldn't edit. Should add that not all had the turned under bottom, such as https://PaulBartlett.zenfolio.com/brmineralweld/e2eb19b1f

 

PAul

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Hi Mark,

 

Attached are some photos that I took at the Ribble Steam Railway in 2013. They are of B575554 which was built with Morton unfitted brake gear by Pressed Steel in 1956. Its condition at Preston shows it to have been rebodied at some point and also given four shoe fitted brake gear with two brake cylinders. These were, I believe, to be of slightly different diameters but under a 4mm wagon I wouldn't worry too much about that! The more puzzling aspect for me about such an arrangement is that, unlike their 21T counterparts with two cylinders there is no changeover lever for loaded/unloaded conditions nor a self-adjusting brake to achieve the same result. Perhaps Paul could come up with an answer.

It had obviously spent its final years carrying spent ballast for the civils as it has the twin cuts in the sides to prevent overloading. It also has a distinctly non-standard end-door stripe! As Paul has mentioned it shows the curved bottom edge to the side which was a feature of many rebodies. The end-door is at the 'wrong' end compared to when it was built where on the clutch side of the brake gear the door would be to the left. Also note that the tie-bar between the axleguards is made of angle and not flat strip and the hand levers also have reinforcement for part of their length.

Coincidentally there is a photo of B569425 from the same Pressed Steel lot in BR Wagons Volume 1. It is in traffic use in 1978 and shows all the features of B575554 apart, obviously, from the cut-outs and that odd white stripe.

Hope this helps.

 

045.JPG.cfab37d66739adb27aec60dadfc20bc4.JPG

 

046.JPG.1c1efc5d6a20388405218108c0fc6ec6.JPG

 

050.JPG.e488a5e48ca2707b4a7ad0568aa552d9.JPG

 

David

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David, thanks for the pictures, very useful indeed.  I am building a 7mm MCV mineral wagon with clasp brakes, so these are going to be very useful.

 

Vacuum cylinders were 21" and 18" dia.

 

The tie bar is also interesting.  L section brass is available.

 

John

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22 hours ago, Ramblin Rich said:

I remember those articles in RM and still have my sand tippler, vacuum brake and 'top flap removed' versions in a box somewhere. I must admit I also left the bar across the top of the side door, probably the article was a bit misleading and we didn't have Paul Bartlett's pictures.... Or the internet! ;)

 

 

Thanks Rich. Glad someone also remembered those articles. I wonder who the author was and which copy they were published in. Very inspirational for the time. 

 

Kind of brings back happy memories of a more inoccent time. 

 

Be good to see your conversions by the way. I'm contemplating a few Iron Ore tippers in the near future. 

 

Cheers, 

 

Mark 

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22 hours ago, brossard said:

This looks like a fun project.  I'm doing one in 7mm from an old kit.

 

You might find useful snippets here:

 

Can I be a bit pedantic, looking at the brakes, in the picture shown, that should be the clutch side (compare to the linked photo).  I have got my brakes back to front countless times.  :rtfm:

 

1mm brass strip should be about right for the tie bar.  Attaching it is another story.  I think CA is about the best bet.  The existing W iron keeper will need to be removed.

 

John

 

Evening John, 

 

Thanks for your indepth reply. Very useful and thanks for all the info. 

 

In some ways it's a bit of retro modelling using the old Railway Modeller article as inspiration. These old Airfix kits have their place still and perhaps a good place to start kit building. Everything other than glue, paint and patience is there.

 

Thanks for the tip re: tie bars and also the brake levers. 

 

Cheers, 

 

Mark 

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21 hours ago, hmrspaul said:

There were lots of rebuild methods. The full rebuild has the bottom of the sides curved under -Bachmann do this.

 

Your original would have been fine for the type of simple rebuild where the alteration was to remove the top door and weld a steel sheet in place https://PaulBartlett.zenfolio.com/brmineralweld/e3dc0fa4c

 

Paul

 

Thanks Paul. 

 

I never knew such a simple conversion existed. Definitley one to model and a nice 16T variance. 

 

Cheers, 

 

Mark

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5 hours ago, DavidLong said:

Hi Mark,

 

Attached are some photos that I took at the Ribble Steam Railway in 2013. They are of B575554 which was built with Morton unfitted brake gear by Pressed Steel in 1956. Its condition at Preston shows it to have been rebodied at some point and also given four shoe fitted brake gear with two brake cylinders. These were, I believe, to be of slightly different diameters but under a 4mm wagon I wouldn't worry too much about that! The more puzzling aspect for me about such an arrangement is that, unlike their 21T counterparts with two cylinders there is no changeover lever for loaded/unloaded conditions nor a self-adjusting brake to achieve the same result. Perhaps Paul could come up with an answer.

It had obviously spent its final years carrying spent ballast for the civils as it has the twin cuts in the sides to prevent overloading. It also has a distinctly non-standard end-door stripe! As Paul has mentioned it shows the curved bottom edge to the side which was a feature of many rebodies. The end-door is at the 'wrong' end compared to when it was built where on the clutch side of the brake gear the door would be to the left. Also note that the tie-bar between the axleguards is made of angle and not flat strip and the hand levers also have reinforcement for part of their length.

Coincidentally there is a photo of B569425 from the same Pressed Steel lot in BR Wagons Volume 1. It is in traffic use in 1978 and shows all the features of B575554 apart, obviously, from the cut-outs and that odd white stripe.

Hope this helps.

 

045.JPG.cfab37d66739adb27aec60dadfc20bc4.JPG

 

046.JPG.1c1efc5d6a20388405218108c0fc6ec6.JPG

 

050.JPG.e488a5e48ca2707b4a7ad0568aa552d9.JPG

 

David

 

Hi David, 

 

Great images and most useful.

 

Those door shots have given me a few ideas. The L section tie rods are interesting. I wonder whether 'L' section plastic strip would fit the bill?

 

Cheers,

 

Mark 

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38 minutes ago, 46444 said:

 

Thanks Rich. Glad someone also remembered those articles. I wonder who the author was and which copy they were published in. Very inspirational for the time. 

 

Kind of brings back happy memories of a more inoccent time. 

 

 

 

The gentleman was called Keith Allen and the articles were published in Railway Modeller at intervals between November 1980 and January 1983.

 

David

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9 hours ago, DavidLong said:

 

The gentleman was called Keith Allen and the articles were published in Railway Modeller at intervals between November 1980 and January 1983.

 

David

 

Thanks David. 

 

Not the Keith Allen? 

 

I'll have to find some copies of these articles. 

 

Cheers, 

 

Mark 

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