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Linkspans and kiosks


Paul Robertson

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Following on from yesterday's scratch building attempt of a security kiosk I had a look at it again this morning and decided I could do a bit better

 

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(yesterday's effort was a bit crooked and lacking in detail) 

 

I thought the scale looked a bit too big as well and a quick Google found the the height was a bit on the generous side for this type of building. Out with the craft knife and some more styrene angle to highlight window ledges and to make a door and I soon had a more reasonable looking cabin. In the spirit of recycling the peco clear plastic packaging which my plate girder bridge sides came in was cut up and used as glazing. I made the roof a little larger to give a nicer overhang effect and this was the result:

 

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(I even managed to incorporate a shelf for the occupant!just needs a spot of paint.)

 

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(And located on the head of the Linkspan Bridge to provide shelter to the poor soul who has to control the traffic in all weather's during loading.)

 

Just another two of those to make! 

 

Having finished this job off I wanted to complete the last section of Linkspan bridge to the upper (vehicle deck) of the ferry. To do this I first needed to tidy up the ferry stern, straightening edges and filling gaps with thin layers of balsa. Once completed I created the second 'movable' Linkspan section using 5mm ply as a base with peco plate girder bridge sides cut and joined together. A further small section of ramp was include to allow for a smooth transition between Linkspan and ferry deck for vehicles.

 

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(completed up bridge deck) 

 

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(And from the other direction looking towards the ferry) 

 

Both upper bridges can be removed to allow access to the lower level. 

 

This now completes the major bridges on the layout the next job will be to build the winding gear housing that will sit above the Linkspan structure. This will be a much bigger scratchbuilding challenge but is basically a corrigated shed on stilts! So lots more balsa with Wills corrugated sheeting kit. 

 

Many thanks for reading

 

Paul

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The photo of the 33s you posted last week looked great. Definitely a novel idea for a layout. Is the ferry intended to be removable, like a cassette? If so, that's neat! Look forward to following your progress. You will have it finished by Christmas at this rate!

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1 hour ago, crompton said:

The photo of the 33s you posted last week looked great. Definitely a novel idea for a layout. Is the ferry intended to be removable, like a cassette? If so, that's neat! Look forward to following your progress. You will have it finished by Christmas at this rate!

Thanks for the comment. Whilst the ferry is currently removable my idea was to have it permanently  fixed to ensure good alignment between the rails. I'd also have to create a separate 'sea' cassette to go in its place when the ferry had departed. Perhaps a temporary fix for the time being whilst I get the rest of the layout sorted and then I can think of grander ideas. 

 

I take no credit for the photos. Just Internet finds that help to illustrate prototypes. Happy to give credit where it is due if I tread on someone's copyright!

 

Xmas 2025 maybe! My father's layout started when my brother and I were still in shorts is still at the baseboard stage some 45 years later! Still he did decide to model the entirety of Ipswich Station and handmade all the track in the station limits. I'm hoping to have something completed way before that although are model railways ever complete?! A subject for a whole different blog me thinks. 

 

 

Paul

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Rev Alan Shore back in 1974 built a complete (UK) train ferry in N gauge, with the idea of being able to lift if out of its dock and replace it with a second (NL) ferry to replicate sailings. However, he quickly abandoned the idea, stating that in the absence of scotch blocks and tie downs he found that free-running N gauge stock was prone to falling out/off the rails/ship!

 

I've seen a layout where the sea the ship is "sat on" is on drawer runners and can therefore repositioned along the quayside. Theoretically, a similar system could be employed to allow your ship to "cast off" and move away from the link span, but as you have said (and Alan Shore also pointed out) having a fixed link means avoiding issues with misaligned tracks.

 

 

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