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16mm photo-plank - Pillar Drill and test wall


Fen End Pit

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As I mentioned in my last blog the next bit of workshop machinery I fancied trying to reproduce was a pillar drill. This proved to be quite a tricky bit of modeling just because there were so many features. I'd taken a photograph of this drill in the shed at Thelkeld.

 

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It looked to me as if the drill was originally belt driven with a 'new' electric motor powering the original drive wheel at the bottom. There then seems to be a belt which takes the drive to the top of the drill via a choice of three pairs of pulleys depending on the speed you require. I could also see the interesting hand wheel which raises and lowers the platform on the pillar. I'm not really sure exactly what all the rest of the gubbins on the top of the drill is for. Perhaps someone can enlighten me. It looked to me as if there was a handle to pull down the drill head but it looks as if this can be reconfigured to give some kind of automatic geared lowering? It looks like you could set the machine up and leave it to drill down at a preset speed? Anyway, it had lots of interesting shapes and, while I've not exactly modeled it all precisely I hope I've captured the feel of the prototype.

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The main pillar was divided into two and the table and bottom drive wheels printed as separate parts. Also separate are the hand wheel to lift the table and the quadrant handle. The parts took just over 4 hours to print at .04mm layer height on the Anycubic Photon. The parts took a little cleaning up but I was blown away by the detail which came out. The toothed rack behind the drill head and the teeth of the gears came out remarkable well, even the lift rod on the table has a thread on it (albeit with a rather coarse pitch than the prototype).

 

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Please bear in mind that this part is only 35mm from front to back.

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I intend to make some drive belts out of paper in a bit.

 

I found a rather nice Bachmann 16mm fireman and together with workbench you can get a sense of scale.

 

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The sharp eyed amongst you will have noticed that there is a section of wall behind the workbench rather that piece of MDF and I'd like your opinion on this. I've never been any good at trying to scribe random stone so I thought I'd try a rolling pin I downloaded from the thingiverse. This printed out on my Ender 5 and looks, well frankly, a bit weird. The roller is 86mm tall and ~25mm diameter so gives a repeat in the pattern at ~80mm. I laid down a 6mm thick of layer of Sculptamold and let it go off for about 30 minutes until it was firm but still 'green'. The roller was rolled into the surface and it took the pattern well. I then made the pattern slightly less patio and more wall by adding in some extra horizontal joints in the stonework. I also found I could smooth in a little extra Sculptamold to fill in some of the joints to make the pattern so it didn't repeat so obviously. Finally I found that a coarse old paint brush could be used to apply a little more texture and strata markings to individual rocks. Do you think this will work as the inside walls of the shed? Ultimately I want something which looks like old white-washed stone.

 

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Please let me know what you think.

 

David

 

Edited by Fen End Pit

  • Like 8
  • Craftsmanship/clever 8

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The parts you are making look the business to me, but difficult to grasp the scale.  Could you maybe include something to help viewers?  Perhaps a coin - maybe a 20p piece as it is fairly distinctive.  Of course, that might be too small, or too big!

 

Regarding the wall, the first thing that caught my eye was the fairly continuous “horizontal” course, just above the bench.  There are no doubt walls like this somewhere, but it doesn’t seem very “coursed” and therefore not much like a building wall, to me.  As you suggest it does look rather “crazy paving”/patio.

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Fantastic modelmaking. 

 

The extra bits at the top and rhs form a powered downfeed, controlled by the lever and dog clutch. Those have formed really well in the printing. 

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Outstanding, as has been the rest of the workshop.

 

I think the wall idea is good in principle, but I'm not sure about having predominantly vertical stones (above the right hand, level with the ear) in it, but if such things exist in the wild, fine.

 

Adrian

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A thought just crossed my mind.  I would have assumed that the pillar drill in the photo has been adapted to be operated by the floor mounted electric motor (right where all the swarf would be heading).  Would it not have originally been driven from an overhead power shaft (can't think of the proper name at the moment).

 

Should I have kept the thought to myself? :blush:

 

One way or another, that cannot take anything away from the results though; Just awesome.

 

Jeff/

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1 hour ago, jeff_p said:

A thought just crossed my mind.  I would have assumed that the pillar drill in the photo has been adapted to be operated by the floor mounted electric motor (right where all the swarf would be heading).  Would it not have originally been driven from an overhead power shaft (can't think of the proper name at the moment).

 

Should I have kept the thought to myself? :blush:

 

One way or another, that cannot take anything away from the results though; Just awesome.

 

Jeff/

Hi Jeff

Yes, I agree, it would have been operated by an overhead power shaft, but I wouldn't have thought that the power shaft would have been fitted by the different sizes of drive wheel to match the three sizes at the top of the drill. It would have been above the height anyone could reach easily to swap the belt ratio. That is why I thought the power belt would have fed the bottom wheel and then the different belt ratios could have been selected from floor level. I think it looks plausible enough.

Thanks

David

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21 hours ago, 26power said:

The parts you are making look the business to me, but difficult to grasp the scale.  Could you maybe include something to help viewers?  Perhaps a coin - maybe a 20p piece as it is fairly distinctive.  Of course, that might be too small, or too big!

 

Regarding the wall, the first thing that caught my eye was the fairly continuous “horizontal” course, just above the bench.  There are no doubt walls like this somewhere, but it doesn’t seem very “coursed” and therefore not much like a building wall, to me.  As you suggest it does look rather “crazy paving”/patio.

 

 

Hi 26power, picture with a 20p as requested. I know it isn't easy to see scale when you have a model in a scale you are not used to. Jumping from 4mm:ft to 16mm:ft does my head in sometimes!

 

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I realized that if I expand the X and Y direction on the 3D printed roller that will have the effect of increasing the diameter of the roller. In turn this will make the stones longer which I think will make the overall effect better.

 

Thanks for your comments.

David

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22 hours ago, Fen End Pit said:

Hi Jeff

Yes, I agree, it would have been operated by an overhead power shaft, but I wouldn't have thought that the power shaft would have been fitted by the different sizes of drive wheel to match the three sizes at the top of the drill. It would have been above the height anyone could reach easily to swap the belt ratio. That is why I thought the power belt would have fed the bottom wheel and then the different belt ratios could have been selected from floor level. I think it looks plausible enough.

Thanks

David

David,

You're absolutely right.  All the pictures of work shops I can see (on google) have lathes and other machines with the belts heading straight up but the limited number of pillar drills all had an intermediate shaft on the ground behind the pillar.   So far it would seem that pillar drills are the only machine I've noticed like this, but I would guess that any machine driven "from the top", like the drill, would have used a similar mechanism.

 

Live and learn, hopefully.

 

Jeff.

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