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CR Diagram 2 Fresh Meat Van


Dave John

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Way back in the 1980s I made one of these from a John Boyle etch ( it is labelled Decent Models No 74 ). I used standard CR parts and it made up into a nice van, but back then I lacked information so a lot of the basics were just wrong. It has been stored a long time but I was having a sort out, rediscovered it and decided to have a go at bringing it up to standard. A day in the brake fluid followed by an attack with the flame torch and I had a new kit to make.

 

So what exactly is it ? I wasn’t sure for a long while, but discussions on the CRA forums led me to discover that there is a drawing for the first body style of the D2 vans with the panelling style of the Drummond coaches, built 1885. Unfortunately there doesn’t seem to be a photo, the later builds had planked sides. What I do know is that these were effectively npcs built to run with passenger trains.

 

This is what I have ended up with now fitted with oil boxes, the correct brake gear, safety chains, air pipes and screw couplings. Trumpet vents are shown on the diagram drawing so I have added those. There doesn’t seem to be a casting available for them so I made them up from laminated styrene.

 

Being fully panelled I think that would be in the npc livery. Possibly they would be lettered “Fresh Meat Traffic” but without a photo I don’t know where or what size, so I have left that off for now.

 

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This is how I think they would generally be used, running at the head of a passenger service, shunted off en route as required.

 

 

 

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I'm sure you are right to give this passenger livery, though the difference compared to the goods stock (but passenger-rated) van next to it is largely in the varnish. I wonder how different they would look once the meat van had been in traffic for a while and the shine worn off? (Given that such vehicles didn't get the carriage cleaners' attention?)

 

The Midland had similar 4-wheel passenger-style meat vans dating from the late 1870s/early 80s; some were turned out in full passenger livery but the majority in goods grey, although still equipped for running in passenger trains.

 

Bye-the-bye, has anyone asked you yet if those are the Hornby carriages? 

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Fair point Compound, I might add a bit of weathering to the body when the paint is fully hardened off. 

 

Nobody has asked about the carriages yet. I have been looking at both the hattons and the Hornby ones. I'm sure that someone will give us some accurate measurements at some point, comparisons with known Caley stock will follow. Both my rakes are in etched brass, making them took me a while. 

 

Had a generic coach in vaguely CR livery been available when I started modelling the CR then I would have bought some to get me going. Hopefully they will generate interest in the pre grouping era as a whole and give both kit and rtr producers an incentive to make more accurate models available. 

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The 6-wheelers from both are 32 ft over body; the Hattons 4-whhelers are 28 ft. My knowledge of Caledonian carriages is a bit hazy but in Drummond's time didn't they have three-layer panelling like the North British, then later what I would call "conventional" panelling (Midland / Great Western-style, per Hattons). Were any 4 or 6-wheelers built in that later style?

 

Not that I'm suggesting you would want to go down the "generic" route now!

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The NB and CR carriages were identical apart from the roof profile ( Drummonds all over the place in those days ! ) 

 

They work out at 28' 6" and 35'  6 1/2".  Close enough for a generic starter I suppose. Very few 4 or 6 wheelers were made in the later style, though some rebuilds of earlier stock. I think some shorter brake coaches were built too, but I'd have to study the carriage book to see how the generics match panelling wise. 

 

 

I do have some coaches in the kit cupboard, maybe a spring/summer project. 

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  • RMweb Gold

Such interesting stock the CR had. The last photo of the full train is quite impressive. It's a shame that wide photos like that don't quite come out in their full glory on a screen. Not sure what can be done about it though!

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The loose coal "distribution centre" in the foreground of the panorama is masterful modelling and totally convincing - bravo.  (Double clicking the image and enlarging using ctrl+alt and scrolling 'up' assists fitting the panorama to the screen width -  I have a pair of screens side by side which helps!).

Kit PW

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True Mikkel, there is a lifetime of odd stock to be modelled. 

 

The original photo is more detailed but it is a quarter of the size for posting on here. I still don't get the depth of field I want but a better camera and lenses is not likely atm.  Not that is in any way critical, the sheer number of pics posted must be a server nightmare for the admins at 10 meg a post. 

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  • RMweb Gold
6 hours ago, kitpw said:

I have a pair of screens side by side which helps!

 

Aha, there's the solution!  Or this:

 

2112386932_Ultrawide(1).jpg.b1d0358f4b32d926e3cf65ab715ce668.jpg

 

Not sure I can justify it just for watching photos of long trains though :)

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